Tom Sawyer, Detective

By Mark Twain

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...TOM SAWYER, DETECTIVE

By Mark Twain


Contents

CHAPTER I. AN INVITATION FOR...

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...wish you was dead and gone too, and done with it
all.

Don't you know what that...

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...he warn't disturbed. He mumbled back:

"Huck Finn, do you want me to let her SEE...

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...it. I
reckon he's somebody they think they better be on the good side of, for
they've...

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...lady
was thinking. At last she says:

"The thing that is mostly worrying your aunt Sally is...

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...off his boots, anyway."

"The mischief he don't! Not even when he goes to bed?"

"No."

It was...

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...YOU come from?"

Well, the man was astonished, of course; and first off he looked like
he...

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...keep mum--swear you'll never, never
tell on me. Oh, boys, be good to a poor devil...

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...A DIAMOND ROBBERY

FROM that time out, we was with him 'most all the time, and...

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...to see if we wanted to buy, and when we was
examining them we had paste...

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...reckon it was he bought?"

"Whiskers?" said I.

"No."

"Goggles?"

"No."

"Oh, keep still, Huck Finn, can't you, you're only...

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...We never
said a word, but went straight up onto the hurricane-deck and plumb back
aft, and...

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...ripping
through my head that tore my brains to rags--and land, but I felt gay and
good!...

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...and hard to act out, I can tell
you. About night we landed at one of...

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...me, and everything quiet. Another five minutes and
I says there's considerable more land behind me...

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...one's aboard, too! Oh, ain't it
hard luck, boys--ain't it hard! But you'll help save me,...

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...would get to his brother's
and hide there and be safe.

He was going to take the...

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...to creep around, and it
was miserable quiet and still and night-breezy and graveyardy and scary.
All...

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...on to see him."

"That's me, too."

Then they both laughed, and went on out of hearing....

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...it?"

"You wait--I'll show you what. Did it have its boots on?"

"Yes. I seen them plain."

"Swear...

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...breath.

"My land! Why, Tom, WE'LL get the di'monds!"

"You bet. Some day there'll be a big...

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...his bulliest old-time blessings, with
as many layers to it as an onion, and whilst the...

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...business to--I know it perfectly well; I know you,
BOTH of you. Now you explain that...

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...Brace was out at the stile and wanted his
brother, and was getting tired waiting supper...

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...hand the first time he got a chance, and see;
and if it was so, he...

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...last night the family hadn't heard about Jake
Dunlap being murdered. Now the men that chased...

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...Tom?"

"Looks like it. It just does. Now where'd they hide him, do you reckon?"

"I don't...

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...soft, with her tears running down,
and stood by his side, and nestled his old gray...

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...ever come out only at night--and then not till after
twelve. There's something wrong about this...

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...way would be to go and ask him. So he started; but
I kept a little...

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...the same, but said if we was in Jake's
fix we would want to go careful...

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...these days, that anybody else that was afflicted was a comfort
to him. Me and Tom...

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...not only that, but he was going to stick to him
till--"Well," I says, "you better...

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...you are. Now
who ever had anything agin that poor trifling no-account? Who do you
reckon would...

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...we went to the place and
he was scratching the ground with all his might, and...

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...maybe it wouldn't ever
happened if he hadn't been so ambitious to get celebrated, and let...

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...who--"

He shut off sudden. I knowed the reason. It give me the cold shudders
when he...

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...night getting him out of there, Huck, and it'll be talked about
everywheres and we will...

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...say a word about his murder when others was
around, and we was glad of that.

Tom...

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...and Benny's; and right he was: as for me, I would 'a' lied the
same way,...

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...the hazel bushes between (that's
along the fence); and we heard...

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...understand it. And Benny and her
mother--oh, they looked sick, they was so troubled. They shoved...

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...we judged it was somebody that was drunk; and by the
...

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...get his
voice; and people all around said the most pitiful...

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...THEN
I remembered something that hadn't took no hold of me...

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...raged right along with his awful tale,
everybody a-staring and gasping, judge, jury, lawyers, and everybody,
and...

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...and tangled up, and I hain't ever
seen eyes bug out and gaze without a blink...

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...tongues; anyway, they'll wish it before I get done.

"That same Saturday evening Bill and Jack...

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...di'monds; because all three stole
them, and then this fellow he got hold of them and...

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...and buried
the murdered man."

He stopped, and stood half a minute. Then--"And who do you reckon...

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...murder him if they got the chance; and we was going to help him
all we...

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...of that platform with a yoke of oxen.

"Oh, it wasn't anything much," he says. "I...

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...arrest him. Which one is it?"

Tom says:

"This late dead man here--Jubiter Dunlap."

Then there was another...

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...down and begun to
unscrew the heel-plate, everybody watching; and when he got that big
di'mond out...

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...reckon. And so the whole
family was as happy as birds, and nobody could be gratefuler...