The Prince and the Pauper

By Mark Twain

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...Bowler




THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER

by Mark Twain

The Great Seal

I will set down a tale as...

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...progress.
XXXI. The Recognition procession.
XXXII. Coronation...

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...ABSORBED IN THINKING"

"A GRIM AND UNSIGHTLY PICTURE"

"THEY ROARED OUT A ROLLICKING DITTY"

"WHILST THE FLAMES LICKED...

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...did not want him.  On the same day another English
child was born to a rich...

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...were not restricted--they had all the floor to themselves,
and might sleep where they chose.  There...

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...a good deal of his time
listening to good Father Andrew's charming old tales and legends
about...

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...remarks,
and Tom's performances, were reported by the boys to their elders; and
these, also, presently began...

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...was a princeling himself.

All night long the glories of his royal estate shone upon him;...

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...the city, waiting for any chance glimpse of
royalty that might offer.  Splendid carriages, with splendid...

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...the palace, which he called his cabinet.
 By his command a repast was brought such as...

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...garment, and sleep
without--like the beasts?"

"Their garment!  Have they but one?"

"Ah, good your worship, what would...

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...it?  Then so shall it be.  Doff thy rags, and don
these splendours, lad!  It is...

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...halberd to a present-arms and said mockingly--

"I salute your gracious Highness."  Then angrily--"Be off, thou...

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...hung as low as the knees or lower; full sleeves; a broad red belt;
bright yellow...

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...that I am none of theirs, but the true prince, and I shall have
mine own...

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...finery; then walked away, imitating the prince's
high-bred carriage, and still observing results in the glass....

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...to me my rags, and let me hence unhurt.  Oh, be
thou merciful, and save me!"

By...

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...to cozen me, the
good King thy father, who loveth thee, and kindly useth thee, with...

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...little confused, then
turned timidly toward the King, saying, "I may go now?"

"Go?  Surely, if thou...

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...still shall he reign!  And hear ye
further, and proclaim it: whoso speaketh of this his...

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...a death-blow to the hope he had cherished that now he would
be set free.  Once...

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...he shall hold his peace,
neither betraying by semblance of surprise or other sign that he...

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...word, for he was
already learning, and in his simple heart was resolved to acquit himself
as...

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...behalf, and then straightway
changed the talk to other matters.

Time wore on pleasantly, and likewise smoothly,...

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...you to command, it is for us to
obey. That thou should'st rest is indeed a...

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...his due
from such as be about him; and, leaving him his Latin, strip him of...

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...be reasonable.  But lived ever an impostor yet,
who, being called prince by the king, prince...

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...them to see
the beloved prince so stricken.

Poor Tom ate with his fingers mainly; but no...

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...nose himself.

His meal being ended, a lord came and held before him a broad, shallow,
golden...

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...his eye, and he muttered,
"Yet will not I die till _He_ go before."

His attendants perceiving...

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...the day that--"

"True, most true!" interrupted the King.  "Fetch it!  Go:  time flieth!"

Lord Hertford flew...

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...leading down to the water, spacious enough to mass the army
of a German principality upon,...

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...Bath, each with
a white lace on his sleeve; then their esquires; then the judges, in
their...

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...Prince continued
to struggle for freedom, and to rage against the treatment he was
suffering, until John...

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...why did'st thou cleave to it when I
so warned thee 'gainst it?  Thou'st broke thy...

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...gave the girls and their mother a beating for
showing sympathy for the victim.

"Now," said Canty,...

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...absolutely perfect; and an imperfect one could not
satisfy her.  Evidently she was racking her head...

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..."But I cannot give him up--oh
no, I cannot, I cannot--he _must_ be my boy!"

The poor...

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...and
hurried him along the dark way, giving him this caution in a low voice--

"Mind thy...

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...the other hand bearing up the end of an imaginary
napkin, presented it in due and...

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...a short march through the Old Jewry and
Basinghall Street to the Guildhall.

Tom and his little...

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...after
the dancers' fashion, with pheasants' feathers in them.  These were
appareled after the fashion of Prussia....

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...wi' the cub!"

Instantly a hand was laid upon the Prince, under the impulse of this
happy...

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...not die!"

The words were caught up and carried eagerly from lip to lip far and
wide...

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...and knew the great history of the Bridge from
beginning to end, and all its strange...

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...said, and I believe thee, whether thy small headpiece be sound
or cracked, my boy.  But...

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...I will be his friend;
I have saved him, and it draweth me strongly to him;...

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...a deep sigh, "Alack, it was but a dream, woe
is me!"  Next he noticed Miles...

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...his royal dignity relaxed a little,
and with his growing contentment came a desire to talk....

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...love; and he had a smooth
persuasive tongue, with an admirable gift of lying--and these be
qualities...

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... He shall never leave my side; he shall be my
pet, my little comrade.  And he...

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...forth
arrayed for battle; but no sooner did the Frenchman glimpse his huge
frame and hear his...

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...clothing.

Hendon disapparelled the boy without dissent or remark, tucked him up in
bed, then glanced about...

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...I have the demon's own time to
thread it!"

And so he had.  He did as men...

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...worship, when a youth came
running and said it was your worship's will that the boy...

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...no hunger now; so, let the rats have it--speed, speed! that
is the word!"  As he...

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...glad his heart, and I shall no more
be beaten. One penny every week the good...

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...the journey down the line and knew that the end of the matter
was drawing near....

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...body of illustrious men named by the late King as his executors
appeared, to ask Tom's...

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...sent a
blush to his face; but no countenance there betrayed any sign that this
strange speech...

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...with the Lady Elizabeth and the little
Lady Jane Grey; though the spirits of the princesses...

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...as I ne'er heard before--as this lad shall
see.)  Give thy business speech."

"'Tis matter of small...

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...speak it out, for it lieth near my heart.  Sith thou art
no more Prince of...

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...a day or two--his wholesome complexion and vigorous
step, assisted by a carefully guarded repose of...

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...success.  He looked sufficiently
like a king, but he was ill able to feel like one....

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...idly interested, but longing with all his heart
to take part in person in its stir...

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...the doors swung open; one high-sounding title after another was
announced, the personages owning them followed,...

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...a pity, for he was a
brave heart--na--na, I mean he hath the _look_ of it!"

The...

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...me what thou knowest."

"If the King's grace please, it did appear upon the trial that...

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...was not
admiration of the decree that had been delivered by Tom, for the
propriety or expediency...

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...however, saw nothing
consequential in the inquiry; he answered, with simple directness--

"Indeed did she, your Majesty,...

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...of
which was lost upon Tom, who was dead to everything but the proposed
cataclysm.  Seeing a...

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...circumstances was never more
strikingly illustrated.

Let us privileged ones hurry to the great banqueting-room and have...

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...in his eye.  He bore himself right gracefully, and all the more
so because he was...

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...requirements of his royal office.




CHAPTER XVII. Foo-foo the First.

Miles Hendon hurried along toward the Southwark...

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...to do it?  But that is apart; lead on,
lead on!  Faster, sirrah!  Art shod with...

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...derisive laugh, and the King would have
assaulted him, but Canty--or Hobbs, as he now called...

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...pedlar with
his pack; a knife-grinder, a tinker, and a barber-surgeon, with the
implements of their trades;...

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...resolved to stay, and never more
venture country-wards--but the accident has ended that."

He inquired how many...

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...to be pelted; they begged again, were whipped again, and
deprived of an ear; they begged...

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...land that hath commanded it!--I
shall hang!" {1}

A ringing voice came through the murky air--

"Thou shalt...

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...'tis not wise, nor well.  Humour thy fancy, if thou must,
but choose some other title."

A...

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...Ruffler put 'Jack' in Hugo's charge, with some brief instructions,
and commanded John Canty to keep...

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... Mayhap he lied. Peradventure you will
even make so bold as to _say_ he lied," scoffed...

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...taken so.  My brother there
will tell your worship how I am racked with anguish when...

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...sensations and experiences, as he moved through the solemn gloom
and the empty vastness of the...

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...of the blankets
he made a bed, then covered himself with the remaining two.  He was...

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...dead and still warm.
He thought he would rather die than touch it again.  But he...

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...was all music to the King, now that he was snug and
comfortable: let it blow...

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...boy?"

"I am the King," was the grave answer.

The children gave a little start, and their...

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...in order that
she might take measures to return him; but all her references to
neighbouring towns...

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...of the King himself!  I will test him."

Full of eagerness to prove her sagacity, she...

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...a staggerer, for a moment, and the King came
near rebelling; but then he said to...

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...he
was now tolerably safe. He listened intently, but the stillness was
profound and solemn--awful, even, and...

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...fortunate."

The hermit rose from his knees; the King knocked.  A deep voice
responded--

"Enter!--but leave sin behind,...

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...to the King's, and whispered--

"I am an archangel!"

The King started violently, and said to himself,...

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...in such a gently caressing way that in
a little while all the fear and repulsion...

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...of time, but worked tranquilly on,
entertaining himself with his thoughts, which broke out occasionally in
articulate...

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...as
a grizzly, monstrous spider, gloating over some hapless insect that lay
bound and helpless in his...

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...him; and straightway the King
heard a talk, to this effect, proceeding from the 'chapel':--

"Homage and...

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...wind!  What an odd
sound!  Come, we will hunt it out!"

Now the King's joy was nearly...

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...had been free.

A moment or two later his limbs were at liberty, and his captors,...

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...the troop had failed. He
had stubbornly refused to act; moreover, he was always trying to...

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...it upon a
piece of leather, which was then bound tightly upon the leg.  This would
presently...

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...with an unpopular
member who played so serious a treachery upon him as the delivering him
over...

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...seen enough--his enemy was captured and the law would get him,
now--so he slipped away, jubilant...

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...crowd at their heels.  The King was inclined to
rebel; but Hendon said to him in...

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...shall I do, what _can_ I do?"

The justice maintained his judicial composure, and simply said--

"Doubtless...

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... What God wills, will happen; thou canst not hurry it,
thou canst not alter it; therefore...

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...do begin to believe thee," said Hendon, with a perplexing mixture of
mockery and half-conviction in...

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...an archangel fetch it.  Go--I am blind for thy sake--I see nothing.
 I will say thou...

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... Hendon
had waited at the hut all day; hope of the King's return died out, then,
and...

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...gateway, whose huge stone pillars
bore sculptured armorial devices.  A noble mansion was before them.

"Welcome to...

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...the arm, dragged him to the window, and began to
devour him from head to foot...

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...King entirely.  By-and-by his Majesty said gravely, and
with a touch of genuine compassion, though the...

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...wall, with an iron
grip about his throat.  "Oh, thou fox-hearted slave, I see it all!
 Thou'st...

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...secure to my domains?  I should be so much the better
able then to--"

The King interrupted...

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...has loved, one cannot betray."

He stepped eagerly toward the door; at that moment it opened,...

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...no cobweb ties of loyalty and honour are concerned."

A faint tinge appeared for a moment...

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...over, and examined it in all lights, but he could not
make anything satisfactory out of...

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... An' I were Sir Hugh, I would take
the shabby carle and--"

The jailer finished by lifting...

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...and he and Hugh insisted
upon the marriage; Edith begged for and obtained a month's respite,
then...

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...dear and gracious
little urchin is he, too; and whether he be mad or no--and they...

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...one of them said, in a voice choked with emotion--

"Oh, thou'lt break our hearts, thou...

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...them a heavy reckoning for this work.
 For every blow they strike now, they shall feel...

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... He said to himself, with satisfaction,
"His disorder mendeth; he hath changed, and groweth gentler.  If...

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...in
prison for life.

"These be honourable scars," he said, and turned back his grey hair and
showed...

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...shame!  This is my servant--set him free!  I am the--"

"Oh, peace!" exclaimed Hendon, in a...

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...is nothing--oh, less
than nothing!--when 'tis weighed against the act of him who saves his
prince from...

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...promptly knocked down and kicked out, without any
words, and then the deep quiet resumed sway...

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...avoided;
so Hendon reined up, and called out--

"I had forgotten to inquire whither we are bound....

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...with
them, with the air of one familiarly accustomed to such performances.
 It no longer confused him...

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...mind became more and more
occupied with his new and enchanting experiences, and by little and
little...

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...the vast fog of its own smoke, all
but the very top of the tall pile...

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...the surging sea of
eager faces, and his heart swelled with exultation; and he felt that
the...

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...loyal uproar was sweeter music to him
than any poetry, no matter what its quality might...

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...not been.  He neither saw nor heard.  Royalty
had lost its grace and sweetness; its pomps...

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...sharp enough to detect that.  The noddings of his plumed head as he
saluted his subjects...

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...in time became holy enough to answer a like purpose for
English monarchs.  Both the throne...

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...the mellow atmosphere, and
drifts slowly along the ranks of ladies; and every rank it touches
flames...

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...of Canterbury lifted
up the crown of England from its cushion and held it out over...

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...wondering surprise.  This thing happened also to the other great
officers.  They glanced at each other,...

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...this foolish lad stricken with a palsy
of guilty confusion. How surprised they were, then, to...

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...and isolated from the world,
a conspicuous figure, occupying an eloquent vacancy.

Now the Lord St. John...

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...upon the new-comer, who stood, with bent head and corrugated
brow, groping in his memory among...

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...'tis sufficient!--and the good God be thanked!" exclaimed the
ragged claimant, in a mighty excitement.  "Go,...

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...remember it myself?"

"Ah, my King, that was easy, since I used it divers days."

"Used it--yet...

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...usual.  Then Miles Hendon would cripple some of those people,
and carry off his little ward,...

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...his stomach with a pint or two of water, and trudged off toward
Westminster, grumbling at...

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...bad
weather. He had hardly seated himself when some halberdiers, in charge
of an officer, passed by....

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...hat off, and left him standing in
the middle of the room, a mark for all...

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...sit in the presence of the
Majesty of England henceforth, age after age, so long as...

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...state, for by it he shall be known, and
none shall copy it; and wheresoever he...

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...killing a deer in
the royal forest.

He showed favour to the justice who had pitied him...

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...is the King's Ward!"--and
so they saluted, and got his kindly smile in return--and they valued...

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...Marshal, and it was necessary to appoint another, who
might officiate at the ensuing ceremony of...

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...(the Protector) gave offence by assuming too much state, he
deserves great praise on account of...

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...of twelve pence was a capital crime in England--as it
had been since the time of...

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...rapidly to its close, and in a few days
he rendered up his spirit to his...

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...Jeremiah Markland, the eminent critic,
particularly in Greek Literature; Camden, the antiquary; Bishop
Stillingfleet; Samuel Richardson, the...