The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg, and Other Stories

By Mark Twain

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...THE MAN THAT CORRUPTED HADLEYBURG AND OTHER STORIES

By Mark Twain


Note: (The title story may also...

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...cared not a rap
for strangers or their opinions. Still, it would have been well to
make...

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...weighing a hundred
and sixty pounds four ounces--"

"Mercy on us, and the door...

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...tallies with it, give him the money,
and ask no further questions, for he is certainly...

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...village are
worth that much. Give me the paper."

He skimmed through it and said:

"Isn't it an...

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...how to estimate HIM. Edward, doesn't it
seem odd that the stranger should appoint Burgess to...

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...me. I wish he wouldn't persist in liking us so; I can't think
why he keeps...

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...vacantly at
the floor, and by-and-by he began to punctuate his thoughts with
little nervous movements of...

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...swallowed once or twice, with her hand at
her throat, then in place of speech she...

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...chick nor child nor relation behind him;
and as long as the money went to somebody...

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...caught.

"I am ashamed to confess it, Mary, but--"

"It's no matter, Edward, I was thinking the...

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...verify the
sack and its history and write the whole thing up anew, and make dashing
free-hand...

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...didn't.

And the night after that they found their tongues and
responded--longingly:

"Oh, if we COULD only guess!"

Halliday's...

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...stranger in the dark--it was in Hale Alley. He and I
talked of it the rest...

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...don't you tell me?"

"Well--er--er--Why, Mary, I can't!"

"You CAN'T? WHY can't you?"

"You see, he--well, he--he made...

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...out that doubt?
What did he want to intrude that for?

Further reflection. How did it happen...

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...instance. In that case he
had swum out and tugged Goodson ashore in an unconscious state...

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...her pastor, and then had
fallen peacefully to rest.

That same Saturday evening the postman had delivered...

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...had lately ventured to set
up a small business in this unpromising village, and his sign...

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...the town-hall Friday evening," then
vanish away like a guilty thing. He was expecting that there...

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...town's just pride in this reputation. He said that
this reputation was a treasure of priceless...

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...the
land--Mr. Billson!'"

The house had gotten itself all ready to burst into the proper tornado
of applause;...

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...of his pocket, opened it, glanced at it, looked
surprised and worried, and stood silent a...

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...two have not quoted the remark in exactly
the same words. You would have noticed that,...

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...and managed to hold in by
main strength and heroic courtesy. At this most inopportune time...

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...the test-remark, including the disparaging
fifteen. (Sensation.) When the late publication was made I recalled
them, and...

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...have finished."

There is nothing in the world like a persuasive speech to fuddle the
mental apparatus...

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...Is it something fresh? Read it! read! read!"

The Chair (reading). "'The remark which I made,'...

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...storm of derisive applause broke out.

"Perhaps they all contain the secret. I move that you...

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...unthankful for that. Thenceforward
he held up each note in its turn and waited. The house...

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..."Mikado" travesty, and sang it three times
with ever-increasing enthusiasm, rising to its feet when it...

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...anyway, made as I am,
even that would not have satisfied me. I wanted to damage...

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...the Committee on Propagation of the Tradition. I suggest that he step
forward on behalf of...

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...circumstances.

Meantime a stranger, who looked like an amateur detective gotten up as
an impossible English earl,...

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...any device which will rouse curiosity and
compel remark. Now if I may have your permission...

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...slipped out, and left the audience making a vast noise, which
was composed of a mixture...

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...even the largest bank-notes makes more bulk than that."

"Edward, why do you object to cheques?"

"Cheques...

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...Mary--and God knows I believed
I deserved them once--I think I could give the forty thousand...

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...seemed to bristle with accusations; it seemed
aimed straight and specially at people who were concealing...

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...some
already. I know it--I know it well. I saw it in a dozen faces after
church....

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...to hear
my confession, so that I may die a man, and not a dog. I...

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...nine days old at the time, and had noticed
that if a pin was sticking in...

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...watch and propagate.

For instance. It would not be possible for a humane and intelligent
person to...

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...make it appear that abstention from lying is a virtue?
Why should we want to beguile...

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...see, and shows that
they are all insane. In fact, it is a country which is...

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...me and was expecting it of me. If I
hadn't done it he would have been...

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...one as that. Mr. Bryant was playing
to the gallery; we all do it. Carlyle said,...

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...have no objection to offer, as already
indicated. I think it was not premeditated but an...

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...about my life that you would like to
know, Mr. Twain,' she said, in her soft...

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...because at bottom
I am afraid of bears.

However, she was ready to begin her story, now,...

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...that one has two in the parlour. Have
you two in the parlour at home?'

The memory...

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...was set, and she was not to be
persuaded. Presently she said:

'Do the rich people, with...

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...got to be fashionable,
everybody liked it, and now everybody has it that can afford it....

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...and begged her to appease my longing by telling
me herself how much this polar Vanderbilt...

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...my eye anxiously the while. I fell over
against her in a quite well-acted faint, which...

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...upon you, and
everybody's homage and respect at your command without the asking;
young, rich, beautiful, sought,...

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...to possess themselves of the debasing
iron fish-hooks of the foreigner. However, I must not dwell...

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...everybody,
and got out the fish-hooks and brought them and flung them scatteringly
over my head, so...

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...I slept, but at last I came suddenly broad awake
and heard my father say in...

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...are innocent, my own--that I know; but say it to me yourself, for
my comfort, then...

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...in such a place! There was an awful hush.
I knew he had pronounced his own...

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...is dirt--let me never hear mention of him again." And oh,
to think--he was innocent all...

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...in that village, and she was a Christian Science doctor and
could cure anything. So she...

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...of anguish, of course--at least I supposed it was, for
it had all the symptoms of...

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...of cat-profanity. I asked with
caution:

'Is a cat's opinion about pain valuable?'

'A cat has no opinion;...

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...asked her to do it backward.

'Very well. Disease sin evil death deny Good omnipotent God...

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...is to say, it could not succeed during the
process of the Second Degree, because there...

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...with and reflects Soul, for the All-in-all is the Altogether,
and the Altogether embraces the All-one,...

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...and--'

'There are no inconsistencies in Christian Science. The thing is
impossible, for the Science is absolute....

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...sun, and the moon under her feet, and upon her
head a crown of twelve stars."

'That...

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...like pulling a distant cork, and I jumped up as
good as new, as to framework,...

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...others when the others
were separate, though not when they were mixed; for when a bran-mash
and...

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...meaning.

The book's serenities of self-satisfaction do almost seem to smack of
a heavenly origin--they have no...

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...mending, but I think it was not done by any member of
the Eddy Trust, nor...

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...cause. It is well to be calm
suburbs it had indeed little ...

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...the merry electric car replaced the
melancholy 'bus, smooth concrete the tempestuous plank sidewalk, the
macadamised road...

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...and then for practising without a diploma,
but his business is as brisk as ever when...

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...and my
cold; but the horse-doctor did it. This convinces me that Christian
Science claims too much....

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...remember. When I, a thoughtful
and unbiased Presbyterian, examine the Koran, I know that beyond any
question...

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... the Mugwumps),
The...

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...no way to get around it: all opinions upon these
great subjects are brass-farthing opinions.

It is...

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...the lead, in the coming great march of Christian Scientism
through the Protestant dominions of the...

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...will be worshipping
that image and praying to it? How long do you think it will...

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...not claim
entire originality, but content itself with passing for an improvement
on an existing religion, and...

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...is the appeal
of Christianity itself. It appeals to the rich, the poor, the high, the
low,...

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...and
draughts, and getting our feet wet, and about forbidden food eaten in
terror of indigestion, that...

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...a very religious man would find the addition of the religious
spirit a powerful reinforcement in...

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...which is of still greater value--he is now 'contented
and happy.' That is a detail which,...

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...a page about another good child--little Gordon. Little Gordon
'came into the world without the assistance...

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...the tooth, and tear and slash its
ulcerations, and pull out the nerve, and dig out...

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...has saved 300 lives. Meantime
it will kill a man every now and then; but no...

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...the faithful, always at extravagant prices, and
always on the one condition--cash, cash in advance. The...

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...or other, is allowed to practise the game
unless he possess a copy of that holy...

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...and ambushed upon the devotee, will
bring the annual increment well up above a billion. And...

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...and does
an incantation or two, and that mesmerises his spirit and puts that to
sleep--brings it...

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...'The
labourer is worthy of his hire.' And now that it has been 'demonstrated
over,' we find...

Page 96

...And so, to heal or help that
man, two imaginations are required: his own and some...

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...wide in the earth. I think that if the business were conducted
in the loose and...

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...he dropped into a
brown study, and was apparently lost to me and to the rest...

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...and literally saved us from starving--Francois
Millet--'

'What! the great Francois Millet?'

'Great? He wasn't any greater than...

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...them they would sell at splendid prices. Isn't it so?"

'"Certainly it is. Nobody doubts that."

'"But--I'm...

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...his might, enlarge his stock all he
can--not pictures, no! skeleton sketches, studies, parts of studies,
fragments...

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...enthusiasm, and said I was a master!

'I put down my brush, reached into my satchel,...

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...with a country editor and started an item
around through the press; not an item announcing...

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...in the old hard times now gone for
ever, carried the cof--'

'Which four?'

'We four--for Millet helped...

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...not remember which. At any rate, I was
not celebrated and I did not give the...

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...proper order, then wrote
all night and beyond it; with this result: that I had a...

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...from New York harbour in the first week of January
there was promise that she would...

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...added:

'We pulled together thirty-two days' rations for the thirty-one men that
way.'

The third mate lifted his...

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...to with a jerk, and snap went the line, hook and all. We also
...

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... ship sank suddenly at about 5 A.M. We find the...

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...'cobbling' sea. One marvels how such boats could live in it.
Is it called a feat...

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...look the fact of our awful situation full in the face.' 'We
are making but little...

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... and wind and rain, in my life before.

That boy's diary is of the...

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...'Thought often of those
at home to-day, and of the disappointment they will feel next Sunday...

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...'Only half a bushel of
bread-crumbs left.' (And a month to wander the seas yet.')

It rained...

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...see him go. It was natural; one could have better
spared the 'Portyghee.' After thirty-two years...

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... Of course we were glad to
see them and have...

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...piece of
biscuit the size of a silver dollar. 'We...

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... strict attention; so I put off half till this afternoon. ...

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...ordinary sort left
in them they will disappear.

Two quarts bread-crumbs left,...

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...to reach
the American group!' The third mate told me in Honolulu that in these
days the...

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... and away from them; our chief hope is a whaler, man-of-war, or some
...

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...had a good drying. I have been trying for
the...

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... etc., all as unreasonable as foolish; still, these things bid us be
...

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...to prepare for anything.
.... is the loudest of all.


...

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...after twice ascending, fixed it and brought down the
block; but...

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...out pretty
well, and should not complain. Yesterday the third...

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...been
marvellously protected, and God, I hope, will preserve us all...

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...thoroughly appreciated.... I do not know that I
feel any...

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...does some little good; but I don't
know.

...

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... good night's rest; but not sleep--we were too happy to sleep; would
...

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...days--some of them, at any rate--men who had
freighted their stomachs with strips of leather from...

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...in an open boat,
sailing four thousand miles in reality and thirty-three hundred and
sixty by direct...

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...of voyaging ahead yet.--M.T.

(2) Six days to sail yet, nevertheless.--M.T.

(3) It was at this time...

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...and yet inside
of an hour you have exchanged the glare and swelter of the city...

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...any
departure from it.'

I said smiling: 'Well, then, doctor, you will have to permit the
departure of...

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...you get hungry, ring and give your order, and I will decide whether
it shall be...

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...it; hour
by hour. The books were all of one breed--shipwrecks; people lost in
deserts; people shut...

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...was of the
regulation pattern of the day: At 7 in the morning, a cup of...

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...a valuable lesson.'

'What makes you think that?'

'Why shouldn't I? You seem to think it taught...

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...Look at the invalids in our shipwreck. They lived
fifteen days on pinches of raw ham,...

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...a day, and they had
no appetite for anything. I questioned them, and then locked them...

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...meal?'

'It was the family's idea. They were uneasy. They thought I was killing
myself.'

'You found a...

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... doing any mischief toward anybody whatsoever. In fact, the Jews
...

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...have no prejudice against him. It may even be that
I lean a little his way,...

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...he is a stranger to the hangman. In the police court's daily long
roll of 'assaults'...

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...overwhelming population of New
York; but that his honesty counts for much is guaranteed by the...

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...fanaticism alone account for this?'

Years ago I used to think that it was responsible for...

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...was. May I not
assume, then, that the persecution of Jews is a thing which antedates
Christianity...

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...successfully compete
with him in any vocation, the law had to step in and save the...

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...Jew in business--in either straight business or the
questionable sort.

In Berlin, a few years ago, I...

Page 152

...are on the same
quest. I think that that is the trouble. In estimating worldly values
the...

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...for the most infamously misused Jew of modern times, do you
find a great or rich...

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...it still has strength. It is plenty
strong enough as concerns Austria, for ten years ago...

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...right along
for those inmates, and accountable for any disappearances that might
occur; it made the Jews...

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...help it. It was a pathetic
tale that was told by a poor Jew a fortnight...

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...very comfortably situated indeed, and to have more than his
proportionate share of the prosperities going....

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...the Jews constitute but one
per cent of the human race. It suggests a nebulous dim...

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...his blood for his flag raises the
average and quality of his patriotism above the Christian's....

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...Lick to Libertyville and Coffman, thirty
miles a day, from July 1, 1887, for one year....

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...they labeled the race in a way to make the angels
weep. As an example, take...

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...opinion of it, anyway!' and he brought his fist down
with emphasis upon the table.

'And I...

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...that he had returned to Europe. Still, time drifted on, and he
was not heard from....

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...duty as chief magistrate of the State, and place no
further bar to Clayton's execution. Duty...

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...the sky, and the people were at their daily work.
Sometimes the talk that came from...

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...strangely stirred, and said to myself: 'To think that it is a
mere human being who...

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...and would follow. But we are made as we are
made, and we cannot help it....

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...among us? It was easily explained. He
had not grown used to being a world-famous person,...

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...the man Szczepanik was not murdered at all. By the decision of the
French courts in...

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...a project to suggest. But first I will write a chapter of
introduction.

I have just been...

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...of
youth. She is now a sort of combination of her two earlier selves: in
religious loyalty...

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...manifestation of our
trivial and fleeting life, into it drifted that black figure with the
corpse-face, and...

Page 173

...Appelles meets Zenobia, the helper of
all who suffer, and tells her his story, which moves...

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...of the details of the piece. Each of the five acts
contains an independent tragedy of...

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...in the third, has lost his stately purities, and
watered the acid of his wit. His...

Page 176

...need a
tonic; you need it very much. Send for 'The Master of Palmyra.' You
will not...

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...of the world for grace and beauty and richness
and splendour and costliness--a majestic drama of...

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...it seemed to me that one would be always trying to get
offending little officials discharged,...

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...isn't
everybody that is on those familiar terms with the President of the
Western Union.'

'Oh, you misunderstand....

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...had begun, and it was too late. He
said, in a level and dispassionate tone:

'Conductor, you...

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...but did not say it, knowing there was no hurry and I could say
it just...

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...say, if called
before the railway officials, that he never dreamed of intending any
offence. It seems...

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...you see how simple and easy that was. The ordinary citizen would
have accomplished nothing--the brother-in-law...

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...boy was not under
his authority, but under that of one of the news companies; but...

Page 185

...no one here
objects.'

One of them declined the risk, but the other one said he would...

Page 186

...States is a much more serious matter than
you and the railroads seem to think, and...

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...you. And I will.'

The conductor looked puzzled, and was thoughtful a moment; then he burst
out...

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...get aboard, gentlemen, get aboard--don't keep us waiting.'

But the Major would not get aboard himself...

Page 189

...hoped that we were done reforming for the trip now, but it was not so.
In...

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...fix a whole nation's attention upon it. If it
come justified out of the discussion which...

Page 191

...for it is not conceivable that this loud ostentation of
simplicity deceives any one. The statue...

Page 192

...allow him to wear the
corresponding uniform at public functions in foreign countries. I would
recommend this...

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...funny
swallow-tail.

Our Government's notions about proprieties of costume are indeed very,
very odd--as suggested by that last...

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...of the world.

But not at present salaries! No; if we are to maintain present salaries,
let...

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... ...

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...at small figures. Consequently,
our foreign representatives have been accustomed to live in
garrets--sometimes on the roof....

Page 197

...country of first importance that pays its foreign
representatives trifling salaries. If we were poor, we...

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...its diplomatic salaries at
the present mean figure.

P.S.--VIENNA, January 10.--I see, by this morning's telegraphic news,
that...

Page 199

...the
lavishest and showiest and most luxury-loving people on the earth; and
at our masthead we fly...

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...guileless; and so it was
exceedingly painful to see him stand there, as serene as a...

Page 201

...donkey a chance to
die before he is found out. I waited for the earthquake. It...

Page 202

...at last.'

And away we did go, and were over the shoulder of the hill before...

Page 203

...I had made four
sea-voyages with him. He was a very remarkable man. He was born...

Page 204

...him a great deal:
told him yarns, gave him toothsome scraps of personal history, and wove
a...

Page 205

...it don't say.
Naturally, the prophets of Baal took all the trade. Isaac was pretty
low spirited,...

Page 206

...they owned up and quit.

'What does Isaac do, now? He steps up and says to...

Page 207

...a
certainty; but no one feels confident that such results will follow
here. Here, apparently, one must...

Page 208

...though it was too ramshackle to go on holding together any
...

Page 209

...obedient, and to be diligent in acquiring ignorance about
things here below, and knowledge about the...

Page 210

...nothing. If it bought it, that would be
joyful, and would give great satisfaction. Also, the...

Page 211

...jealousies,
hostilities, and warring interests. This could be expected to furnish
forth a parliament of a pretty...

Page 212

...be
weakened by this, both would suffer damage.

The Opposition in the House, although in the minority,...

Page 213

...of terraces of desks for the
ministry, and the official clerks or secretaries--terraces thirty feet
long, and...

Page 214

...this way and that, and is not
easy to keep up with--a pious smile, a holy...

Page 215

...power in the interest of
the Right (the Government side): among these, with arbitrarily closing
an Order...

Page 216

...argumentatively; and the official
stenographers had left their places and were at his elbows taking down
his...

Page 217

...are waiting for, old
Grayhead?' (Long-continued clatter of desk-boards from the Left, with
shouts of 'The vote!...

Page 218

...feel obliged to
summon the Ordner, and beg him to restore order in the House.'

Wolf. 'I'd...

Page 219

...It was the Majority's scheme--as charged by the
Opposition--to drown debate upon the bill by pure...

Page 220

...in order that he might
get some rest from his wearing labours; but he limited his...

Page 221

...could not; and all hung enchanted and wondering upon
his words, and all testified their admiration...

Page 222

...the
thirty-three-hour session.

To merely stand up in one spot twelve hours on a stretch is a...

Page 223

...that time being tried as a wholly new experiment.
I will go back to a previous...

Page 224

...sent in one day. Dr. Lueger read some of them, and
described others. Some of them...

Page 225

...the Christian Socialists!'

Mr. Kletzenbauer (Christian Socialist). 'Dam--nation! Are you ever going
to quiet down?'

Wolf discharges a...

Page 226

...we know what is going to happen, and
are glad we came, and glad we are...

Page 227

...high calling.

Wolf is yelling another market report now.

Gessman. 'Shut up, infamous louse-brat!'

During a momentary lull...

Page 228

...out his shirt-front). 'Yes, keep quiet,
pimp!'

Schonerer (to Lueger). 'Political mountebank!'

Prochazka (to Schonerer). 'Drunken clown!'

During the...

Page 229

...pass
unavenged. One difference between schoolboys and the law-makers of
the Reichsrath seems to be that the...

Page 230

...blows; it was snatched
from him and flung to a distance; it hit a peaceful Christian...

Page 231

...and substitute a stand-up vote by this fact: that a little
later, when a deputation of...

Page 232

...to stream in, among them many forms and faces grown
familiar of late. By one o'clock...

Page 233

...abroad, and then
stood there in a compact little crowd, eleven strong, and held the place
as...

Page 234

...therefore there is no use in
calling it together again for the present; public opinion believes...

Page 235

...offered to get the book and send it to me and the
Cambridge text-book containing the...

Page 236

...story and the
story told by the dull and solemn Californian, and observe how exactly
alike they...

Page 237

...the name of the
frog--and sing out, 'Flies, Dan'l, flies!' and quicker'n you could wink
he'd spring...

Page 238

...you'll
hold my box a minute, I'll go and get you a frog.' And so the...

Page 239

...a stranger here, and
I ain't got a frog; but if I had a frog I'd...

Page 240

...English, to see what the trouble was; that is,
to see just what sort of a...

Page 241

...his frog, and he
of it was right, for some men who were travelled, who had...

Page 242

...frog, him carried to that individual, and
said:

'Now if you be ready, put him all against...

Page 243

...the tale is modern, and not borrowed from
some ancient Greek book.'

'Yes. It is not permissible...

Page 244

...any patience; my loyalty was smirched, to his eye, because my
father had owned slaves. I...

Page 245

...to reading chivalric
novels and singing forlorn love-ditties. He had some pathetic little
nickel-plated aristocratic instincts, and...

Page 246

...with turning out of bed at midnight and four
in the morning, for a while; grateful...

Page 247

...the overhanging branches, he began to whisper a plan of
assault upon that house, which made...

Page 248

...cause of the Southern Confederacy. He closed
the solemnities by belting around me the sword which...

Page 249

...here sufficiently to say that we did learn to ride,
after some days' practice, but never...

Page 250

...Bowers on his staff. Bowers
said he wouldn't serve on anybody's staff; and if anybody thought...

Page 251

...they were already present,
and doing the most of the talking too. The question was, which...

Page 252

...held our breath and listened, and it seemed to be the enemy
coming, though it could...

Page 253

...and so forth, till he
made us all feel shabbier than the dogs had done, and...

Page 254

...a repulsive nightmare. As
for doubting that so barbarous an order had been given, not one...

Page 255

...told Sergeant
Bowers to go out to that place and stay till midnight; and, just as...

Page 256

...grim trade; learned
to obey like machines; became valuable soldiers; fought all through the
war, and came...

Page 257

...out to be false; so at last even we began to grow indifferent
to them. One...

Page 258

...the damp, earthy, late-night
smells now rising and pervading it. Then, wondering, we crept stealthily
out, and...

Page 259

...and was not armed. He was a stranger in the
country; that was all we ever...

Page 260

...that earnest band practising
their murderous cuts and slashes under the eye of that remorseless old
fanatic.

The...

Page 261

...too, though proceeding in the other direction.

The thoughtful will not throw this war-paper of mine...

Page 262

...a body's sister in order to do it, is just simply abscheulich.
Here's only three weeks...

Page 263

...in cats. I never saw such a reform. And it's just so with all
his principles:...

Page 264

...are you sure?

A. Sure as guns--Gatling guns!

M. 'Sh! don't, child, it's schrecklich! Darling--you aren't mistaken?

A....

Page 265

...so mochte ich noch heute Vormittag dort ankommen, da es mir
sehr daran gelegen ist--Annie, I...

Page 266

...a German
conversation. Now, when I started to learn German--such poor German as
I know--the case was...

Page 267

...Bett
gegangen--

A. My! how fliessend you speak!

M. Danke schon--und sagte dass sie nicht wohl sei.

A. Good?...

Page 268

...gestern in dem Laden
des deutschen Kaufmannes war!' Potztausendhimmelsdonnerwetter! Oh, ich
war ganz rasend! Wie ich aber...

Page 269

...that'll see us through?

GEO. Why it's got to. Suppose we wandered out of it and...

Page 270

...Aber ich bitte Sie, Sie storen mich durchaus nicht.

W. (To both girls.) Wenn wir Sie...

Page 271

...beabsichtigt.

A. (Mollified.) Sehr wohl, lassen Sie gut sein. Aber thun Sie es nicht
wieder. Sie mussen...

Page 272

...Es ist sehr schwul in diesem Coupe.

GR. (Aside.) Coupe.

GEO. Sie haben Recht. Erlauben Sie mir,...

Page 273

...nothig--bin ich taub und blind.

W. Unvergleichbares Madchen! Und (giving the rest of the money) darnach?

GR....

Page 274

...Well, how does sickness seem to agree with you?

WIRTHIN. So well that I've never been...

Page 275

...walk on
watch-springs! And happy?--by the bliss in their eyes, you'd think
they're in Paradise! Ah, that...

Page 276

...zu einem so
wunderschonen Gedicht hatte begeistern konnen?

W. Liebste! Es ist nur eine Kleinigkeit.

A. Nein, nein,...

Page 277

...quick, I mean. Let go,
you rascals!

GEO. We'll never let go till you put us on...

Page 278

...from the French Meisterschaft--like this, for instance: 'Je
voudrais faire des emplettes ce matin; voulez-vous avoir...

Page 279

...their loss cost him. There you have
it: the measure of the magnitude of a dream-failure...

Page 280

...speech and
lack of trained professional vivacity; he would be put on real estate,
and would have...

Page 281

...over. Has
any boyhood dream ever been fulfilled? I must doubt it. Look at Brander
Matthews. He...

Page 282

...dusky half-lights, let me drown
The haunting Pathos of the Might-Have-Been.

...

Page 283

...its Respite from the Hum
And Clash of sordid Strife--O Fools,
...

Page 284

...Further, they think
it a strange thing that Mr. Twain, who was never invited to meddle...

Page 285

...perishable splendours of the brush.
They knew the secret spot where one must stand--
...