The Innocents Abroad — Volume 06

By Mark Twain

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...INNOCENTS ABROAD

by Mark Twain

[From an 1869--1st Edition]

Part 6.



CHAPTER L.

We descended from Mount Tabor, crossed a...

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... It was a tiresome ride to us, and perfectly
exhausting to the horses. We...

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...their loftiest ambition to picture worthily
on their canvas; a spot whose history is familiar to...

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...and I suppose we ought to wonder at the
peculiar marvel of the preservation of these...

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...this rock to rest, once, when they had walked up from Capernaum.
They hastened to preserve...

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...she is rather boisterous."

The third and last pilgrim moved by, before long, and he said:...

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...it follow that
it is our duty to find beauty in these present women of Nazareth?

I...

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...the
responsible party as he never dreamed of being thrashed, and...

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...to fame. Heavy as lead, and
flexible as India-rubber, usually...

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..."My eye was not dimmed by
those tears nor my heart...

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...married to the girl who had been cured of leprosy. Whereupon the
...

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...the juice of the dead bird, brings forth feathers; and
when...

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...which
I remember painfully, and possibly one or two mountain trails in the
Sierra Nevadas. Often,...

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...any disposition to harm us, but I do feel
afraid of my own comrades.

Arriving at the...

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...even their feelings or trample upon their prejudices, but
we were out of water, thus early...

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...to his mother.

"And there came a fear on all. ...

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...engraving there was no
desolation; no dirt; no rags; no fleas; no ugly features; no sore...

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...motive whatever. It used to seem a very impolite, not to say a
rude, question,...

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...of crime to part with one's inheritance at
any price--and even if a man did part...

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...of the orphan sons. Then he killed all the relatives, and
teachers, and servants and...

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...no doubt, came also the celebrated Good Samaritan. Herod the
Great is said to have...

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...in dove's dung and
ass's meat was ruined.

We were glad to leave this hot and dusty...

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...thirty centuries ago. I
found myself gazing at any straggling scion of this strange race...

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...tomb of
Joseph, the dutiful son, the affectionate, forgiving brother, the
virtuous man, the wise Prince and...

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...people are looking
at you. We went to bed at ten, and got up again...

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...that are dead and gone centuries ago, had no interest for us--we
longed to see Jerusalem....

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...is. The appearance of the city is peculiar. It
is as knobby with countless...

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...represented among the
fourteen thousand souls that dwell in Jerusalem. Rags, wretchedness,
poverty and dirt, those...

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...which has been
much worn by the lips of pilgrims. This slab serves as an...

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...hit upon a plan that would be a certain test. A noble lady
lay very...

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...of the cathedrals of Italy and France.

But the relic that touched us most was the...

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...before
the sun went down his journey of life would end.

Still moving through the gloom of...

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...sun had come out
and made shadows it could not have made any for him. ...

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...Weighed down by
sorrow and disappointment, he died before I was born--six thousand brief
summers before I...

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...spot
where the good Catholic priests say the soldiers divided the raiment of
the Saviour.

Then we went...

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...columns; through a sombre cathedral gloom
freighted with smoke and incense, and faintly starred with scores...

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...in the spot is very, very greatly
marred by that reflection. He looks at the...

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...will be no vestige of Bunker Hill Monument left, but America
will still know where the...

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...grottoes below; he
looks next at the show-case with a figure of the Virgin in it,...

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...is in an
excellent state of preservation, considering its great age. They showed
us where Jesus...

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...found on this
morning walk through the crooked lanes that lead toward Calvary, was a
certain stone...

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...carnage without a wound. And it is
said that five hundred years afterward he followed...

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...Jerusalem burn a
ghastly blue! He does this every fifty years, just the same. ...

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...done it. Very few people have a grip like
Gabriel--the prints of his monstrous fingers,...

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...remind Mahomet not to forget the
worshipers who placed them there. It is considered the...

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...and the orange-trees
that flourish in the court of the great Mosque, is a wilderness of
pillars--remains...

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...his
thirty pieces of silver, and we also lingered a moment under the tree a
venerable tradition...

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...tried to
collect it back, but it could not be done.

We entered the Garden of Gethsemane,...

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...again to return. School-boy days are
no happier than the days of after life, but...

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...fades utterly from sight and leaves St. Peter's
swelling above the level plain like an anchored...

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...who
had fired one of the shots, and learned from his own lips how, in this
imminent...

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...Sunday Schools do him great injustice; they
give one the impression that he was poor. ...

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... I forbear to tell what he was going to do to
that Bedouin that owned...

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...and was fed by the ravens.

Ancient Jericho is not very picturesque as a ruin. ...

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... And cast a wistful eye
...

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...fancy,) and we
could not judge of the width of the stream by the eye. ...

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...was only a different kind of
smell, but not conspicuous on that account, because we have...

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...the variegated villainy and novelty of it
that charmed us. Salt crystals glitter in the...

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...world of grand masonry that
rises, terrace upon terrace away above your head, like the terraced...

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...for
book-makers to say "I thought so and so as I looked upon such and such...

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...no disposition to overlook, and no disposition to forget: and that
is, the honest gratitude I...

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...cut in the living rock. This was the "manger" where Christ
was born. A...

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...depart from her. We took
many specimens, to the end that we might confer happiness...

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...all--though in good sooth it is not respectable to say it, and
not poetical, either.

We do...

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...as level as a floor and
free from stones, and besides this was our last march...

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...ought to be glad that we did not make it for
the purpose of feasting our...

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...turns to ashes at the touch. Nazareth is forlorn; about that
ford of Jordan where...

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...to cast all these torturing little anxieties far away--ropes of
steel they were, and every one...

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... As soon as the anchor was down, Jack and I got a boat and
went...

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...Nile; to the superb
groves of date-palms. One of our most inveterate relic-hunters had his
hammer...

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...to Egypt. What might become of them then they
did not know and probably did...

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...to read this sketch in
my note-book, now, and know that I can stand Shepherd's Hotel,...

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..."Fifteen wants it, sir."

"Fifteen! why he's got a double lot...

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...peeling in shreds from the walls.

I sighed and said: "This...

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...off, growling as before.

The genius of that porter was something...

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...him in a canter half a day without
tiring. We had plenty of spectators when...

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...rise of the river and
prophecy whether it will reach only thirty-two feet and produce a...

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... It was a corrugated, unsightly mountain of
stone. Each of its monstrous sides was...

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...answered with some more frightful springs,
and an unenlisted volunteer behind opened a bombardment of determined
boosts...

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...the watch, and the whole
service to be rendered for a single dollar. In the...

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...stay
right here and risk money on you as long as Dan has got a cent."

I...

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...Dan and Jack and I started
away for a walk. A howling swarm of beggars...

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...with everlasting snows.
I had heard that such was the custom of great mountains in other...

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...seen created and destroyed; of the nations
whose birth it had witnessed, whose progress it had...

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...or the bastinado.
Then he desisted and went away.

The Sphynx: a hundred and twenty-five feet long,...

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...tell any thing about the
strange, strange city of Cairo, because it is only a repetition,...

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...smoking-room and
mourned over the lost comrade the whole night long, and would not be
comforted. ...

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...length of the
Mediterranean proper, also, and then cross the full width of the
Atlantic--a voyage of...

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...or perish. He stopped in the foretop, repeatedly, and was as often
...

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...on, and so forth, for several days. Finally,
anchored off...

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...out of sight. We had seen no
land fade from view so regretfully.

It had long...

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...fronts were
swept by the trailing fringes of the clouds.

But we could not land. We...

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...foot in the
iron staple of a door that had been heedlessly left off a hatchway,...

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...of the cruise lest I
might be betrayed into using other than complimentary language. However,
I...

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...other fourth was composed of young girls. But it was not. It was
...

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...met with precious little sympathy. The excursionists
danced, on three...

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...a sensation,
and, I suppose I may add, created a famine....

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...in French! We never did succeed in
making those idiots...

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... are all dead by this time. They could not go through...

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...frescoed churches of Venice, Naples, and the cathedrals of Spain;
some...

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...the Bermudas because they were in the programme.
We did not...

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...of my mind--and now, if the Quaker City were
weighing her anchor to sail away on...

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...of patriarchs than suffer so.
We never packed our trunks but twice--when we sailed from New...

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...meteor, and was gone again,
we hardly knew how or where. We shall remember, always,...