The Innocents Abroad — Volume 05

By Mark Twain

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...INNOCENTS ABROAD

by Mark Twain

[From an 1869--1st Edition]

Part 5.



CHAPTER XLI.

When I last made a memorandum, we...

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...above decks and below; such a riotous system of packing and
unpacking; such a littering up...

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...us a
trifling little province in some unvisited corner of the world,) were
coming to the Holy...

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...fellow's family very well, and that they were an
old and highly respectable family and worth...

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...not traveling by the guide-book? I selected a certain horse
because I thought I saw...

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...we were invited to "the saloon." I had thought before that
we had a tent...

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... ...

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...make a track in the dust like a pie
with a slice cut out of it....

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...too sociable.

I think the owner of this prize had a wrong opinion about him. ...

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...a countless swarm. Of all that mighty host, none but
the two faithful spies ever...

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...and the lineal descendants of these
introduced themselves to us to-day. It was pleasant to...

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...now, and yet all the mysteries the pack-mules carry are not
revealed. What next?




CHAPTER XLIII.

We...

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...the Sun, the Temple of Jupiter, and several smaller
temples, are clustered together in the midst...

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...no larger than those above my head. Within the temple, the
ornamentation was elaborate and...

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...an eloquent rebuke
unto such as are prone to think slightingly of the men who lived...

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... Men might die,
horses might die, but they must enter upon holy soil next week,...

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...at about eleven o'clock at night on the
banks of a...

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...chasm, lined
thick with pomegranate, fig, olive and quince orchards, and...

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...least two hours out of our way,) and
reached Mahomet's lookout...

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...beautiful picture that ever human eyes rested upon in all the
broad universe! If I...

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... orange flower, O Damascus, pearl of the East!"

Damascus dates back anterior...

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...Bagdad on
enchanted carpets.

It was fairly dark a few minutes after we got within the wall,...

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...the landlord. But a finely curled and scented
poodle dog frisked up and nipped the...

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...in a gallop always, yet never get tired
themselves or fall behind. The donkeys fell...

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...had his doubts about that style of a "chosen vessel" to preach the
gospel of peace....

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...for the same offense, and he had to escape
and flee to Jerusalem.

Then we called at...

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... He was the
favorite of the king and lived in great state. "He was...

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...Syria without an umbrella. They told
me in Beirout (these people who always gorge you...

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...a scene like this,
comes this fantastic mob of green-spectacled Yanks, with their flapping
elbows and bobbing...

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...whose arms and legs are gnarled and twisted like grape-vines.
These are all the people you...

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...castle of Banias, the stateliest ruin of that kind on earth, no
doubt. It is...

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...feels like doing when he gets into camp, all
burning up and dusty, is to hunt...

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...was
nevertheless the scene of an event whose effects have added page after
page and volume after...

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...women and children looked worn and sad, and distressed with
hunger. They reminded me much...

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...swarm! The lame, the halt,
the blind, the leprous--all the distempers that are bred of...

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...this day.
Among his patients was the child of the Shiek's daughter--for even this
poor, ragged handful...

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...I do not wish to see
it. I have seen the backs of all the...

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...volume. This puddle is an important source of the Jordan.
Its banks, and those of...

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...it was and is
a mighty stretch when one can not traverse it by rail.

The small...

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...the ample
support of their six hundred men and their families, too.

When we got fairly down...

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...me.

We could not stop to rest two or three hours out from our camp, of
course,...

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...drawing his trusty revolver, and then dashing the spurs
into "Mohammed" and sweeping down upon the...

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...come into her tent
and rest himself. The weary soldier acceded readily enough, and Jael...

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...above, occurs the phrase
"all these kings." It attracted my attention in a moment, because...

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...air with their
fragrance, and the birds singing in the trees. But alas, there is...

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...he would say, Build temples: I will
lord it in their ruins; build palaces: I will...

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...Church tells me, I
believe. But I sat there and watched that turtle nearly an...

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...a choice of the most beautiful passage in a book which
is so gemmed with beautiful...

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...arrives from the
Quaker City excursion, and they will infallibly dig it up and carry it
away...

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...rascality placed him there?

Just before we came to Joseph's Pit, we had "raised" a hill,...

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...in instead of hiring a
single one for an hour, as quiet folk are wont to...

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...never shall know how it was--I shudder yet when I think how the place
is given...

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...bottling up slang, and so crowded in
regard to the matter of being proper and always...

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...that it had
ever been a town. But all desolate and unpeopled as it was,...

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...are. Christ visited
Magdala, which is near by Capernaum, and he also visited Cesarea
Philippi. He...

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...the books paint them. If one be calm and resolute he can
look upon their...

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...timber of any consequence
in Palestine--none at all to waste upon fires--and neither are there any
mines...

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...front wall for specimens, as is their honored custom, and
then we departed.

We are camped in...

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...is to the Mohammedan and
Jerusalem to the Christian. It has been the abiding place...

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...by the hour down through the crystal depths and notes the colors of
the pebbles and...

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... the banks, which are all of the richest green, is broken and
...

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...a picture beautiful--to one's actual vision.

I claim the right to correct misstatements, and have so...

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...a scene of desolation and misery."

This is not an ingenious picture. It is the...

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...made up their minds to find no other,
though possibly they did not know it, being...

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...of the sun. Then, we scarcely feel the fetters.
Our thoughts wander constantly to the...

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...was. It turned out to be simply because Pliny mentions
them. I have conceived...

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...inquiry all down
the line.

"Our guard! From Galilee to the birthplace of the Savior, the...

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...end of a
burnt-out stove-pipe. I shut one eye and peered within--it was flaked
with iron...

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... And down toward the southeast lay a landscape that
suggested to my mind a quotation...

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...this open plain. The splendidly
mounted masses of Moslem soldiers swept round the north end...

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...of Esdraelon,
checkered with fields like a chess-board, and full as smooth and level,
seemingly; dotted about...

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...on you from every possible direction, and where
even the flowers you touch assail you with...

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...not a picture to fall into
ecstasies over. Such is life, and the trail of...