The Innocents Abroad — Volume 04

By Mark Twain

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...INNOCENTS ABROAD

by Mark Twain

[From an 1869--1st Edition]

Part 4.



CHAPTER XXXI.


...

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...know
by these signs that Street Commissioners of Pompeii never attended to
their business, and that if...

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...keep the hat-rack, I suppose; next a room with a large marble basin
in the midst...

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...go
through. We do that way in our cities.

Every where, you see things that make...

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...set in cement of
cinders and ashes: the wine and the oil that once had filled...

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...skeleton of a man was found,
with ten pieces of gold in one hand and a...

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...as old as the hills to us now--and
went dreaming among the trees that grow over...

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...ranks of battered and nameless
imperial heads that stretch down the corridors of the Vatican, one...

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...misnomer.

At seven in the evening, with the western horizon all golden from the
sunken sun, and...

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...much of his time instructing himself
about Scriptural localities.--They say the Oracle complains, in this hot
weather,...

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...distance of five or six
miles. In the valley, near the Acropolis, (the square-topped hill...

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...two, and far apart, over a low hill,
intending to go clear around the Piraeus, out...

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...and over a
little rougher piece of country than exists any where else outside of the
State...

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...inspect their massive blocks of marble, or measure their
height, or guess at their extraordinary thickness,...

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...capitals are still measurably perfect,
notwithstanding the centuries that have gone over them and the sieges
they...

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...its dead eyes. The place
seemed alive with ghosts. I half expected to see...

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...left the Parthenon to keep its watch over old Athens, as it had kept
it for...

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...on our road, we had a parting view of the Parthenon, with the
moonlight streaming through...

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...contraband. They
evidently suspected him of playing some wretched fraud upon them, and
seemed half inclined...

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...heard our signal on the ship. We
rowed noiselessly away, and before the police-boat came...

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...the sources of Grecian
wealth and greatness. The nation numbers only eight hundred thousand
souls, and...

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...dead, now. They were born too late to see Noah's ark, and died too
soon...

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...broad river which connects the Marmora and Black
Seas,) and, curving around, divides the city in...

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...There was no freak in dress too crazy to be indulged
in; no absurdity too absurd...

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...few hours afterward we saw him sitting on a stone at a corner,
in the midst...

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...wrinkled and twisted
like a lava-flow--and verily so tumbled and distorted were his features
that no man...

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...old when this church was new, and then the
contrast must have been ghastly--if Justinian's architects...

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...waxed floor. Some of
them made incredible "time." Most of them spun around forty...

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...the neatest piece of architecture, inside, that I have seen
lately. Mahmoud's tomb was covered...

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...are private now.
Stocks are up, just at present, partly because of a brisk demand created
by...

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... "There is nothing new in Nubians. Slow sale.

"Eunuchs--None...

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...platoons and regiments, and took
what they wanted by determined and ferocious assault; and that at...

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...a
second. So it is said. But they don't look it.

They sleep in the...

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...any dumb
animal, it is said. But they do worse. They hang and kick...

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...institution. They know what a
pestilence is, because they have one occasionally that thins the...

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... The man buys it, of course, and finds nothing in it. They
do say--I...

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...the Turkish bath; for years and years I have promised myself
that I would yet enjoy...

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...fall excited no comment. They expected it, no doubt. It belonged in
the list...

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...warmed up
sufficiently to prepare me for a still warmer temperature, they took me
where it was--into...

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...to take it out again without wasting any time
about it. Then he brought the...

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...be called Ferguson. It can not be helped.
All guides are Fergusons to us. ...

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...talked to me from the same motive; I am sure that both enjoyed the
conversation, but...

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...it iron tears trickle down and
discolor the stone.

The battle-fields were pretty close together. The...

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...woman won't know any different." [His
aunt.]

This person gathers mementoes with a perfect recklessness, now-a-days;
mixes...

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...fears no more.

Odessa is about twenty hours' run from Sebastopol, and is the most
northerly port...

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...the fearful
and wonderful costumes from the back country; examined the populace as
far as eyes could...

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...in all its dread
sublimity, I begin to feel my fierce desire to converse with a...

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...the
passengers--a smile of love, of gratification, of admiration--and with
one accord, the party must begin to...

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...Russian imbues his polite things with a heartiness, both
of phrase and expression, that compels belief...

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...not looking at her shoes. I was glad to observe that she wore her
own...

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...rose again; if he dropped lifeless where he
stood, his fall might shake the thrones of...

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...simple as they had been at the Emperor's. In a few minutes,
conversation was under...

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...and cold meats, and was served on the centre-tables
in the reception room and the verandahs--anywhere...

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...privacy of their firesides, they are
strangely like common mortals. They are pleasanter to look...

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...we were
going to do with ourselves, was suddenly transformed into anxiety about
what we were going...

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...be too familiar with people I only know by reputation, and whose
moral characters and standing...

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...new land--a new one to us, at least--Asia.
We had as yet only acquired a bowing...

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...my brother, the Grand Duke's, and
give them a square meal. Adieu! I am...

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...like a
honeycomb with innumerable shops no larger than a common closet, and the
whole hive cut...

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...that she
has been without her little community of Christians "faithful unto
death." Hers was the...

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...also, that
within that time the swamp that has filled the renowned harbor of Ephesus
and rendered...

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...dress up in their best raiment and show themselves at the door.
They are all comely...

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...close to one till we got to Smyrna. These
camels are very much larger than...

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...Christians, and not a building; that the Bible
spoke of them as being very poor--so poor,...

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... NOTICE:

"We, the undersigned, claim five claims...

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...view?--what did they want up
there? What could any oyster want to climb a hill...

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... When the storm finished and left every body drenched through
and through, and melancholy and...

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...cases of our tallest pilgrims, however. There
were no bridles--nothing but a single rope, tied...

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...a gray ruin of ponderous blocks
of marble, wherein, tradition says, St. Paul was imprisoned eighteen
centuries...

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...and actors and musicians to
amuse them; in days that seem almost modern, so remote are...

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...easily work up
ourselves into ecstasies over it,) is one that lies in this old theatre
of...

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...his
head into a noose which one of the young men was carrying carelessly, and
they had...

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...was gone, and nothing save the brass
that was upon his collar remained. They wondered...

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...that opened said, We know not these. The Seven said, How,
you know them not?...

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...of olden time, perchance: Rumpunch, Jinsling, Egnog.

Such is the story of the Seven Sleepers, (with...