The Innocents Abroad — Volume 03

By Mark Twain

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...INNOCENTS ABROAD

by Mark Twain

[From an 1869--1st Edition]

Part 3.




CHAPTER XXI.


We voyaged by steamer down the Lago...

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...hammer to drive them; the sponge; the reed
that supported it; the cup of vinegar; the...

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... said Dan.

"He had no other name. The name I have spoken was all...

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...were on foot, and the dust upon their
garments betokened that they had traveled far. ...

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...ye plunged from off yon dizzy tower. Give ye good-day."

"God keep ye, gentle knave--farewell."

But...

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...the noisome caverns of his donjon-keep for lo these thirty
years. And for what crime?...

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...Juliet and Romeo et al., but hurry straight to the ancient city
of the sea, the...

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... And this
was the storied gondola of Venice!--the fairy boat in which the princely
cavaliers of...

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...dreamy and beautiful. But what
was this Venice to compare with the Venice of midnight?...

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...kept it up the whole night long, and I
never enjoyed myself better than I did...

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... The path lies o'er the sea,
...

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...was beheaded,
and where the Doges were crowned in ancient times, two small slits in the
stone...

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...table around which they had sat was there still, and likewise the
stations where the masked...

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...them, and resigning himself to hopeless apathy, driveling
childishness, lunacy! Many and many a sorrowful...

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... That seems to be
the idea. To be on good terms with St. Mark,...

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...believe that if
those holy ashes were stolen away, the ancient city would vanish like a
dream,...

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...confidence of the educated hackman. He never makes a
mistake.

Sometimes we go flying down the...

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...her--tiresome stuck-up thing!"
Human nature appears to be just the same, all over the world. ...

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...then, the
strange pageant being gone, we have lonely stretches of glittering water
--of stately buildings--of blotting...

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...the case be otherwise,
I beg his pardon and extend to him the cordial hand of...

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...deliberately designed and erected by the great Architect of the
Universe.

Think of our Whitcombs, and our...

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...and convents. The secret
history of Venice for a thousand years is here--its plots, its...

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...about these imaginary portraits, nothing that I can
grasp and take a living interest in. ...

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...of assorted monks, undesignated, and we feel encouraged to
believe that when we have seen some...

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...it is--I had not observed it before."

I could not bear to be ignorant before a...

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...you please."

I wrote on. The barber began on the doctor. I heard him...

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...entirely true, no doubt.

And so, having satisfied ourselves, we depart to-morrow, and leave the
venerable Queen...

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...that
the ungrateful city that had exiled him and persecuted him would give
much to have it...

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...been
more faultless than this flute, and yet to count the multitude of little
fragments of stone...

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...soon felt remarkably tired. But there was no one abroad, now
--not even a policeman....

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...I beg to observe
that one hundred and eighty feet reach to about the hight of...

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...which is a few years older than the Leaning Tower, is a
stately rotunda, of huge...

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...said it came from a tomb, and was used by some
bereaved family in that remote...

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...to talk to. The others are wandering,
we hardly know where. We shall not...

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...hard as adamant, as straight as a line, as smooth as
a floor, and as white...

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... They, in a manner, confiscated the domains of
the Church! This in priest-ridden Italy!...

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...appealing mutely, with sad eyes, and sunken
cheeks, and ragged raiment, that no words were needed...

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...are employed in that Cathedral.

And now that my temper is up, I may as well...

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...for bread
rather than starve with the nobility that is in him untainted, the excuse
is a...

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...niceties of doctrine, are absolutely necessary for the
salvation of some kinds of souls, but surely...

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...wash clothes, half the day, at the public tanks in the streets,
but they are probably...

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...their heads and would not be satisfied. Then they consulted a good
while; and finally...

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...compared with which other pleasures are
tame and commonplace, other ecstasies cheap and trivial. Morse,...

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...Broadway or
their Pennsylvania Avenue or their Montgomery street and milked at the
doors of the houses....

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...shops, and is curled and frizzled into scandalous and
ungodly forms. Some persons wear eyes of...

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...they never have been driven by the soldiers into a
church every Sunday for hundreds of...

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...that sometimes they use a blasphemous plow that works
by fire and vapor and tears up...

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...proportion to the dome. Evidently they would not answer to
measure by. Away down...

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... Visitors
always go up there to look down into the church because one gets the...

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...Hills, and the blue Mediterranean. He can see a panorama that is
varied, extensive, beautiful...

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...Mother Church used to
administer it, is very, very soothing. It is wonderfully persuasive,
also. ...

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...as a Virgin Mary to-day, is built about
with shabby houses and its stateliness sadly marred....

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...is holy.

Seventeen or eighteen centuries ago this Coliseum was the theatre of
Rome, and Rome was...

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... CLAUDIA."

Ah, where is that lucky youth to-day, and where the little hand that
wrote...

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...the
broad-sword,

...

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...tragedian who has of late been winning such
golden opinions in...

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...he was killed. His sisters, who were present, expressed
considerable...

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...handkerchiefs. Marcus
Marcellus Valerian (stage name--his real name is Smith,)...

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...will take
these remarks in good part, for we mean them...

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... Tuesday, 29th, if he lives."


I have been a dramatic critic myself, in...

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...Oliver did not. The ground was frozen, and it froze our backs while
we slept;...

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...out from there, can't you!"
--from time to time. But by and by he fell...

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...Leghorn and the custom house
regulations of Civita Vecchia. But, here--here it is frightful. ...

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...wished in his heart he could
do without his guide; but knowing he could not, has...

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...own hand!
--come!"

He took us to the municipal palace. After much impressive fumbling of
keys and...

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...made it interesting for this Roman guide. Yesterday we spent
three or four hours in...

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...he dead?"

That conquers the serenest of them. It is not what they are looking...

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...necessary arrangements, but our too limited time
obliged us to give up the idea. So...

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...hard as he pleased.

The old gentleman's undoubting, unquestioning simplicity has a rare
freshness about it in...

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..."Renaissance," notwithstanding I believe they told
us one of the ancient old masters painted it--and then...

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...Thomas. He was a young prince, the scion
of a proud house that traced its...

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...process,
the party is informed that his mother is dead, and he weeps." Horrible!

I asked...

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...oil painting in
the world; and partly because it was wonderfully beautiful. The colors
are fresh...

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...him no satisfaction.

There is one thing I am certain of, though. With all the...

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...the Patent Office are governmental noses,
and they bear a deal of character about them.

The guide...

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...an inscription below says,
"Blessed Peter, give life to Pope Leo and victory to king Charles."...

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...time like a boy in a candy-shop
--there was every thing to choose from, and yet...

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...and a half arrived
at the town of Annunciation. Annunciation is the very last place...

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...they called her on
again with applause. Once or twice she was encored five and...

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...it liquefies a little quicker and a little quicker, every day,
as the houses grow smaller,...

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...Again he demanded more,
and got a franc--demanded more, and it was refused. He grew...

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...it.




CHAPTER XXX.

...

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...even in New York, I think. There are seldom any sidewalks, and
when there are,...

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...liveries, and to the Faubourg St. Antoine to see
vice, misery, hunger, rags, dirt--but in the...

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...of a foreman who gets
thirteen.

To be growing suddenly and violently rich, as this man is,...

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...not go in
at all when the tide is up. Once within, you find yourself...

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...a little, and
time him; suffocate him some more and then finish him. We reached...

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...steep that we had to stop, every
fifty or sixty steps, and rest a moment. ...

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...and invisibly from a
thousand little cracks and fissures in the crater, and were wafted to...