The Innocents Abroad — Volume 02

By Mark Twain

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...INNOCENTS ABROAD

by Mark Twain

[From an 1869--1st Edition]

Part 2.




CHAPTER XI.

We are getting foreignized rapidly and with...

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...the "nub" of it, and then a word drops in that no man can translate,
and...

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...and his shoulders stooped
forward a little, and looked as if he had his hands under...

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...wrought with his own hands. How thick the names were! And
their long-departed owners...

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...in grease obtained from his food; and then dug through the
thick wall with some trifling...

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...knew then what the poet meant when he sang of: "--thy cornfields
green, and sunny...

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...with the crimson and gold of the setting sun; of dizzy
altitudes among fog-wreathed peaks and...

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...you shall not go
astray. You cannot pass into the waiting room of the depot...

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...But why?
Because when one occurs, somebody has to hang for it! Not hang, maybe,
but...

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...of a
tree or the turning of a hedge, the marvel of roads in perfect repair,
void...

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...dinner we felt like seeing such Parisian specialties as we might
see without distressing exertion, and...

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...found that it was even so.

I said I wanted to be shaved. The barber...

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...residence and deliberately
skins you in your private apartments. Ah, I have suffered, suffered,
suffered, here...

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...In a whole city-full,
Gas we...

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...gently and as daintily as
a cat crossing a muddy street; and oh, he was urbanity;...

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...Armand de la
Chartreuse, or something that would sound grand in letters to the
villagers at home,...

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...carriage stopped.

"What's this?"

"Zis is ze finest silk magazin in Paris--ze most celebrate."

"What did you come...

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...look at them. Drive on."

And the doctor: "We need no silks now, Ferguson. ...

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...living grace about his movements and a living
intelligence in his eyes--watched him swimming about as...

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...those
cheers were not heartfelt and cordial.

Abdul Aziz, absolute lord of the Ottoman empire--clad in dark...

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...of the Ottoman Empire! Born to a
throne; weak, stupid, ignorant, almost, as his meanest...

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...the brilliant adventurer, Napoleon III., the
genius of Energy, Persistence, Enterprise; and the feeble Abdul-Aziz, the
genius...

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...his conscience
at rest--he had assassinated the Duke of Orleans. Alas! Those good old
times...

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...into a room which
was hung all about with the clothing of dead men; coarse blouses,
water-soaked;...

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...smoked. When we arrived at
the garden in Asnieres, we paid a franc or two...

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...center and danced a jig; next he performed some gymnastic
and balancing feats too perilous to...

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...orgies
that stormy night in "Alloway's auld haunted kirk."

We visited the Louvre, at a time when...

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...of it reminds one that it was not always so. The
cross marks the spot...

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...brain. Every
faculty of mind, every noble trait of human nature, every high occupation
which men...

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...will, you find it furnished with those bouquets and immortelles. Go
when you will, you...

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...first name is not mentioned by any author, which is
unfortunate. However, George W. Fulbert...

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...the marriage should be kept secret
from the world, to the end that (while her good...

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...heard his name mentioned. She had become prioress of
Argenteuil and led a life of...

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...nobody, and was buried at Cluny, A.D., 1144. They removed his
body to the Paraclete...

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...to dinner and would
be back in an hour--would Monsieur buy something? We wondered why...

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...field. By and by there was a sound of
music, and soon the Emperor of...

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...dozens of them. They were like nearly all the Frenchwomen I ever saw
--homely. ...

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...over
the ample space; broad flights of stone steps leading down from the
promenade to lower grounds...

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...trimmed their shrubbery into
pyramids and squares and spires and all manner of unnatural shapes, and
when...

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...had all
slept in succession, but no one occupies it now. In a large dining...

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...say
--live lorettes.

All through this Faubourg St. Antoine, misery, poverty, vice, and crime
go hand in hand,...

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...out of sight. They did so, and the
besieging party grew noisy and more and...

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... Most of the young demoiselles are robed in a cloud of white
from head to...

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...by right
of discovery, I think, because he drove off several other professionals
who wanted to take...

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...before it
for fifteen minutes, he said it was not the birthplace of Columbus, but
of Columbus'...

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...they said, had confined
him when he was in prison. We did not desire to...

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...light, far above your
head, where the tops of the tall houses on either side of...

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...edifices, we have seldom seen before; and surely the great
blocks of stone of which these...

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...stars. When we have been prowling at
midnight through the gloomy crevices they call streets,...

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...we passed the battle-field of Marengo.

Toward dusk we drew near Milan and caught glimpses of...

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...the
doors, the windows--in nooks and corners--every where that a niche or a
perch can be found...

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...fully
appreciate its great size until I noticed that the men standing far down
by the altar...

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...minutes--they
seemed hours. It appeared to me that the lagging moonlight never, never
would get to...

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...hand, and his purse were always
open. With his story in one's mind he can...

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...our wisdom was at fault in this regard.

As we came out upon the floor of...

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...it is finished. In addition it has one thousand five hundred
bas-reliefs. It has...

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...billingsgate they use.
Inspiration itself could hardly comprehend them. If they would only show
you a...

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...Borgia, a lady for whom I
have always entertained the highest respect, on account of her...

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...pleasant to the eye, the scene was vivacious, everybody
was genteel and well-behaved, and the ladies...

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...on the shelf occasionally and renew our
edges!

I do envy these Europeans the comfort they take....

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...Italian. Dan resumed:

"Soap, you know--soap. That is what I want--soap. S-o-a-p, soap;
s-o-p-e,...

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... when I only had one; hier vous avez charged me avec glace when...

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...be
famous in song and story. And the first thing that occurred was the
infliction on...

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...expression is gone from them; the hair is a dead blur upon
the wall, and there...

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...about it, I am satisfied that the Last Supper was a
very miracle of art once....

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...aright, or if either of them did
it.

Any one who is acquainted with the old masters...

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...accustomed to encomiums on wonders
that too often proved no wonders at all. And so...

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...vast,
dreamy, bluish, snow-clad mountains twenty miles in front of us,--these
were the accented points in the...

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...does--and
we walk among the shrubbery and smoke at twilight; we look afar off at
Switzerland and...

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...gallants in silken tights
coming down to go serenading in the splendid gondola in waiting.

A great...

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...the shadows that fell from the
cliff above--and down in the margin of the lake every...

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...trout, in Tahoe, and at a measured depth of eighty-four
feet I have seen them put...

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...it
does not look a dead enough blue for that. Tahoe is one thousand five
hundred...