The Innocents Abroad — Volume 01

By Mark Twain

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...INNOCENTS ABROAD

by Mark Twain

[From an 1869--1st Edition]

Part 1.


...

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...Conquered--Curiosities of
the Secret Caverns--Personnel of Gibraltar--Some Odd Characters
--A Private Frolic in Africa--Bearding a Moorish Garrison...

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... CHAPTER XIV.
The Venerable Cathedral of Notre-Dame--Jean Sanspeur's Addition
--Treasures and Sacred Relics--The Legend of the...

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...XXI.
The Pretty Lago di Lecco--A Carriage Drive in the Country--Astonishing
Sociability in a Coachman--Sleepy Land--Bloody Shrines--The...

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...of the Bleeding Heart
--The Legend of Ara Coeli

...

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... CHAPTER...

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... ...

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...Battle--Ground of Joshua
--That Soldier's Manner of Fighting--Barak's Battle--The Necessity of
Unlearning Some Things--Desolation

...

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...LIII.
"The Joy of the Whole Earth"--Description of Jerusalem--Church of the
Holy Sepulchre--The Stone of Unction--The Grave...

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...Hotel--Preparing for the
Pyramids

...

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...waived their rights and given me the necessary permission. I have
also inserted portions of...

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...will
insert it here. It is almost as good as a map. As a...

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...time will be
given not only to look over the city,...

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...lay along the coast of
Italy, close by Caprera, Elba, and...

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...Here it is proposed to
remain two days, visiting the harbors,...

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... From Alexandria the route will be taken homeward, calling at
...

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... The ship will at all times be a home, where the excursionists, if
...

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... J. T. H*****, ESQ. R. R. G*****,
...

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...the ship's library
would afford a fair amount of reading matter, it would still be well...

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...rather a
back seat in that ship because of the uncommonly select material that
would alone be...

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...in the nation are you
going to?"

"Nowhere at all."

"Not anywhere whatsoever?--not any place on earth but...

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...pier; we answered them gently from the slippery
decks; the flag made an effort to wave,...

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... I felt a
perfectly natural desire to have a good, long, unprejudiced look at the
passengers...

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...the chin and
bandaged like a mummy, appeared at the door of the after deck-house, and
the...

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...a low voice:

"Who is that overgrown pirate with the whiskers and the discordant
voice?"

"It's Captain Bursley--executive...

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...they were beginning to feel at home. Half-past six was no
longer half-past six to...

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...right or the left. Very often one made calculations for a
heel to the right...

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...tremendous an enterprise as the keeping of a journal
and not sustain a shameful defeat.

One of...

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... That cat wouldn't fight, you know. First I thought I'd copy
France out of...

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...went scurrying down
to the rail as if they meant to go overboard. The Virginia...

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...improve it, but this encouraged young George to join in
too, and that made a failure...

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...the ship
look dismal and deserted--stormy experiences that all will remember who
weathered them on the tumbling...

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...bells you'll find her just about ten minutes short of her
score sure."

The ship was gaining...

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...mud
standing up out of the dull mists of the sea. But as we bore...

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...lava
walls, make the hills look like vast checkerboards.

The islands belong to Portugal, and everything in...

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...an observer to
tell at a glance what particular island a lady hails from.

The Portuguese pennies,...

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...into a language
that a Christian could understand--thus:

10 dinners, 6,000 reis, or . . ...

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...desire to know more than his father did
before him. The climate is mild; they...

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...excellent a state of preservation as if
the dread tragedy on Calvary had occurred yesterday instead...

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...ungainly affairs and submitted to the indignity of making a
ridiculous spectacle of ourselves through the...

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... Here was an island with
only a handful of people in it--25,000--and yet such fine...

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...for pricking him up, another a
quarter for helping in that service, and about fourteen guides...

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...were abroad on
the ocean. And once out--once where they could see the ship struggling
in...

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...canvas piled on canvas till
she was one towering mass of bellying sail! She came...

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...and lively
picture from whatsoever point you contemplate it. It is pushed out into
the sea...

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...think, for an army could hardly climb the
perpendicular wall of the rock anyhow. Those...

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...dream of trying so
impossible a project as the taking it by assault--and yet it has...

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...all around, in gabardine, skullcap, and slippers, just as they
are in pictures and theaters, and...

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...what does he say? Why, be says that they was
both on the same side,...

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...of our own devising. We form rather more than half the list of
white passengers...

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...seem
rather a comely member. I tried a glove on my left and blushed a...

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...musingly:

"Some gentlemen don't know how to put on kid gloves at all, but some do."

And...

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...were not wild enough--they were not fanciful enough--they
have not told half the story. Tangier...

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...and all more or less ragged. And here are Moorish women who
are enveloped from...

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...with the
phantoms of forgotten ages. My eyes are resting upon a spot where stood
a...

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...of a store in Tangier is about that of an ordinary
shower bath in a civilized...

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...regular system of
taxation, but when the Emperor or the Bashaw want money, they levy on
some...

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...so delicate a patient
as a debilitated clock. The great men of the city met...

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...but if he suspects her purity, he bundles her back to her
father; if he finds...

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... They
take with them a quantity of food, and when the commissary department
fails they "skirmish,"...

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... So the Spaniards touched them on a tender point that
time. Their unfeline conduct...

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...is the completest exile that I can conceive of.
I would seriously recommend to the government...

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...yet that knowed anything.
He'll go down now and grind out about four reams of the...

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...have
all listened to so often without paying any attention to what it said;
and after that...

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...not understand. He appeared to be very ignorant of French. The
doctor tried him,...

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... Here
we were in beautiful France--in a vast stone house of quaint
architecture--surrounded by all manner...

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...bound for and when we expected to get
there, and a great deal of information of...