The Innocents Abroad

By Mark Twain

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...INNOCENTS ABROAD

by Mark Twain


[From an 1869--1st Edition]



...

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...Conquered--Curiosities of
the Secret Caverns--Personnel of Gibraltar--Some Odd Characters
--A Private Frolic in Africa--Bearding a Moorish Garrison...

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... CHAPTER XIV.
The Venerable Cathedral of Notre-Dame--Jean Sanspeur's Addition
--Treasures and Sacred Relics--The Legend of the...

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...XXI.
The Pretty Lago di Lecco--A Carriage Drive in the Country--Astonishing
Sociability in a Coachman--Sleepy Land--Bloody Shrines--The...

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...of the Bleeding Heart
--The Legend of Ara Coeli

...

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... CHAPTER...

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... ...

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...Battle--Ground of Joshua
--That Soldier's Manner of Fighting--Barak's Battle--The Necessity of
Unlearning Some Things--Desolation

...

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...LIII.
"The Joy of the Whole Earth"--Description of Jerusalem--Church of the
Holy Sepulchre--The Stone of Unction--The Grave...

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...Hotel--Preparing for the
Pyramids

...

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...waived their rights and given me the necessary permission. I have
also inserted portions of...

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...will
insert it here. It is almost as good as a map. As a...

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...time will be
given not only to look over the city,...

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...lay along the coast of
Italy, close by Caprera, Elba, and...

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...Here it is proposed to
remain two days, visiting the harbors,...

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... From Alexandria the route will be taken homeward, calling at
...

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... The ship will at all times be a home, where the excursionists, if
...

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... J. T. H*****, ESQ. R. R. G*****,
...

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...the ship's library
would afford a fair amount of reading matter, it would still be well...

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...rather a
back seat in that ship because of the uncommonly select material that
would alone be...

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...in the nation are you
going to?"

"Nowhere at all."

"Not anywhere whatsoever?--not any place on earth but...

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...pier; we answered them gently from the slippery
decks; the flag made an effort to wave,...

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... I felt a
perfectly natural desire to have a good, long, unprejudiced look at the
passengers...

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...the chin and
bandaged like a mummy, appeared at the door of the after deck-house, and
the...

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...a low voice:

"Who is that overgrown pirate with the whiskers and the discordant
voice?"

"It's Captain Bursley--executive...

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...they were beginning to feel at home. Half-past six was no
longer half-past six to...

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...right or the left. Very often one made calculations for a
heel to the right...

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...tremendous an enterprise as the keeping of a journal
and not sustain a shameful defeat.

One of...

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... That cat wouldn't fight, you know. First I thought I'd copy
France out of...

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...went scurrying down
to the rail as if they meant to go overboard. The Virginia...

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...improve it, but this encouraged young George to join in
too, and that made a failure...

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...the ship
look dismal and deserted--stormy experiences that all will remember who
weathered them on the tumbling...

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...bells you'll find her just about ten minutes short of her
score sure."

The ship was gaining...

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...mud
standing up out of the dull mists of the sea. But as we bore...

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...lava
walls, make the hills look like vast checkerboards.

The islands belong to Portugal, and everything in...

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...an observer to
tell at a glance what particular island a lady hails from.

The Portuguese pennies,...

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...into a language
that a Christian could understand--thus:

10 dinners, 6,000 reis, or . . ...

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...desire to know more than his father did
before him. The climate is mild; they...

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...excellent a state of preservation as if
the dread tragedy on Calvary had occurred yesterday instead...

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...ungainly affairs and submitted to the indignity of making a
ridiculous spectacle of ourselves through the...

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... Here was an island with
only a handful of people in it--25,000--and yet such fine...

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...for pricking him up, another a
quarter for helping in that service, and about fourteen guides...

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...were abroad on
the ocean. And once out--once where they could see the ship struggling
in...

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...canvas piled on canvas till
she was one towering mass of bellying sail! She came...

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...and lively
picture from whatsoever point you contemplate it. It is pushed out into
the sea...

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...think, for an army could hardly climb the
perpendicular wall of the rock anyhow. Those...

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...dream of trying so
impossible a project as the taking it by assault--and yet it has...

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...all around, in gabardine, skullcap, and slippers, just as they
are in pictures and theaters, and...

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...what does he say? Why, he says that they was
both on the same side,...

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...of our own devising. We form rather more than half the list of
white passengers...

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...seem
rather a comely member. I tried a glove on my left and blushed a...

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...musingly:

"Some gentlemen don't know how to put on kid gloves at all, but some do."

And...

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...were not wild enough--they were not fanciful enough--they
have not told half the story. Tangier...

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...and all more or less ragged. And here are Moorish women who
are enveloped from...

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...with the
phantoms of forgotten ages. My eyes are resting upon a spot where stood
a...

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...of a store in Tangier is about that of an ordinary
shower bath in a civilized...

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...regular system of
taxation, but when the Emperor or the Bashaw want money, they levy on
some...

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...so delicate a patient
as a debilitated clock. The great men of the city met...

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...but if he suspects her purity, he bundles her back to her
father; if he finds...

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... They
take with them a quantity of food, and when the commissary department
fails they "skirmish,"...

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... So the Spaniards touched them on a tender point that
time. Their unfeline conduct...

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...is the completest exile that I can conceive of.
I would seriously recommend to the government...

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...yet that knowed anything.
He'll go down now and grind out about four reams of the...

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...have
all listened to so often without paying any attention to what it said;
and after that...

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...not understand. He appeared to be very ignorant of French. The
doctor tried him,...

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... Here
we were in beautiful France--in a vast stone house of quaint
architecture--surrounded by all manner...

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...bound for and when we expected to get
there, and a great deal of information of...

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...artificial process in ordinary bottles
--the only kind of ice they have here. We are...

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...a land
where wine is nearly as common among all ranks as water! This fellow
said:...

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...unclosed an eye and slowly closed it again,
abating no jot of his stately piety of...

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...his cell by night
through a wicket.

This man carved the walls of his prison house from...

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...unspoken troubles, and that breast so oppressed
with its piteous secret had been here. These...

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...hard to make railroading pleasant in any
country. It is too tedious. Stagecoaching is...

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...Dan says, it had its
"discrepancies."

The cars are built in compartments that hold eight persons each....

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...you, as is very
often the main employment of that exceedingly self-satisfied monarch, the
railroad conductor of...

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... We love to hear them prate and drivel and
lie. We can tell them...

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... There was no "talking back," no dissatisfaction
about overcharging, no grumbling about anything. In...

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...They told us
the jewelers would not dare to violate this law, and that whatever a
stranger...

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...strong English expletive and said, "Foreigner, beware!" Then this
outlaw strapped his razor on his...

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...like a public square--and in
both instances we achieved far more aggravation than amusement. We
expected...

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...it would be next to impossible to find a good
guide unemployed. He said he...

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... He drew from his
pocketbook a snowy little card and passed it to us with...

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...loiter about and wait for
him. We asked him to sit down and eat with...

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...I see, I see. I meant to have told you that we did not...

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...and what sort of
people Paris guides are. It need not be supposed that we...

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...of Turkey were about to
review twenty-five thousand troops at the Arc de l'Etoile. We
immediately...

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...the man who was sneered at and reviled and
called Bastard--yet who was dreaming of a...

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...The
Arabian Nights, but has small regard for the mighty magicians of to-day,
and is nervous in...

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...and preached the third Crusade, more than six hundred years ago;
and since that day they...

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...gold and silver utensils used in the great
public processions and ceremonies of the church; some...

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...it with satisfied pride to the passers-by, a prophetic vision
of this dread ending ever flitted...

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...frisking about the
garden or sitting in the open air in front of the flagstaff and...

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...tripped
forward lightly to meet the opposite gentleman, tripped back again,
grasped her dresses vigorously on both...

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...the old masters
that might as well be left unsaid.

Of course we drove in the Bois...

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...illustrious men
and women who were born to no titles, but achieved fame by their own
energy...

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...the
astronomer, Larrey the surgeon, de Suze the advocate, are here, and with
them are Talma, Bellini,...

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...Fulbert, a canon
of the cathedral of Paris. I do not know what a canon...

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...of study, gave
ourselves up wholly...

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...Now for
Fulbert! The heart so wounded should be healed at last; the proud spirit
so...

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...official head of the
monastery of St. Gildas de Ruys, at that time, and when he...

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...of Abelard and Heloise. Such is the history that
Lamartine has shed such cataracts of...

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...not know what "Que voulez les
messieurs?" means, but such was his remark.

Our general said,...

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...of mind enough to pretend that he had
simply called on a matter of private business...

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...beautiful city a
regretful farewell. We shall travel many thousands of miles after we
leave here...

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...fairy picture the life and animation which was all of perfection it
could have lacked.

It was...

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...They make trees take fifty
different shapes, and so these quaint effects are infinitely varied and
picturesque....

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...with pictured designs and
fine workmanship, but were dusty and decaying now. They had their
history....

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...an obstruction more irresistible
than the flesh and bones of men--boulevards whose stately edifices will
never afford...

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...about her breezy decks. And yet it was not altogether
like home, either, because so...

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...snowflakes. The multitude
moved round and round the park in a great procession. The...

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...in plumed helmets and gallant coats
of mail, and patrician ladies in stunning costumes of centuries...

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...then one comes across a friar of
orders gray, with shaven head, long, coarse robe, rope...

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...positive, but I think we have
seen as much as a keg of these nails. ...

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...that the
people may be cool in this roasting climate. And they are cool, and...

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...last and divided their conquests equably among their great
patrician families. Descendants of some of...

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...we must go,
nevertheless.

Our last sight was the cemetery (a burial place intended to accommodate
60,000 bodies,)...

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...a wonder it is! So grand, so solemn, so vast! And yet so...

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...and eighty-two steps and stop till he came. It was not
necessary to say stop--we...

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...vein, artery, muscle, every fiber and tendon and tissue
of the human frame represented in minute...

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...was there, with the corners of the mouth drawn
down, and the eyes fixed and glassy...

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...priest put on a short white lace garment over his
black robe, crossed himself, bowed reverently,...

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...and
eight feet high, all of virgin gold, and brilliant with precious stones;
and beside these were...

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...cost a hundred
thousand dollars, with the four hundred and eight statues which adorn
them. Marco...

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...so. It was a
large place. Seven separate and distinct masses of humanity--six great
circles...

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...creatures' backs, as if
it had fallen there naturally and properly. Smart fellow--if it be...

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...sleeping fifteen minutes between the counts
and paying no attention to his marking.

Afterward we walked up...

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...sees a drunken man among them. The change that has come over our
little party...

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...once, but
there was a good reason for it. There was not such an article...

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...all over Italy every day. For instance,
observe the printed card of the hotel we...

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...picture in a moment--the Saviour with bowed head
seated at the centre of a long, rough...

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... What
would you think of a man who gazed upon a dingy, foggy sunset, and...

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...heart plainer than the tongue
could.

"Now," he said, "observe my face--what does it express?"

"Despair!"

"Bah, it expresses...

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...background a troop of shadowy soldiers in Continental uniform
were limping with shoeless, bandaged feet through...

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... There was no resisting
it.

Then the girl took a gun and fired it. We...

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...for company, but their room would have been
preferable, for there was no light, there were...

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...of cities, and of tossing waves, into a great calm of
forgetfulness and peace.

After which, the...

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...with glimpses of the white
dwellings that are buried in them; in front, three or four...

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...with rare and roseate shadows;
A...

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...the level world; a sea whose every aspect is impressive, whose
belongings are all beautiful, whose...

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...skim of ice upon its surface, although lakes in the same range of
mountains, lying in...

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...him stretched upon the cross, his
countenance distorted with agony. From the wounds of the...

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...where once some old
Crusader's flag had floated. The driver pointed to one of these...

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...well with them. But his heart said, Peace, is not thy brother
watching over thy...

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...kitchen spits,
and enjoyeth the same, calling it pastime. These thirty years Luigi's
countess hath not...

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...save me!" she cried; "save me from a fate far worse than death!
Behold these...

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...harlequin. When we discovered
that, that legend of our driver took to itself a new...

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...her ruin and
her desolation from our view. One ought, indeed, to turn away from...

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...and alleys;
ponderous stone bridges threw their shadows athwart the glittering waves.
There was life and motion...

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...had also brought
pianos and guitars, and they played and sang operas, while the plebeian
paper-lanterned gondolas...

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...a glorious city in the sea;
...

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...for of the three hundred Senators eligible to
the office, the oldest was usually chosen Doge,)...

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...Three
into the Lion's mouth, saying "This man is plotting against the
Government." If the awful...

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...from
all cheerful sounds, buried in the silence of a tomb; forgotten by his
helpless friends, and...

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...here in by-gone centuries and have died and gone to the
dev--no, simply died, I mean.

Under...

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...Mahomet
causes its devotees to abhor anything that is in the nature of pork, and
so when...

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...to me and a
never diminishing matter of interest. I am afraid I study the
gondolier's...

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...by St. Mark's and the Bridge of Sighs, and cut
through the alley and come up...

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...staid families, with prayer-book and beads, enter the
gondola dressed in their Sunday best, and float...

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...and astonish people when
we get home. We wish to excite the envy of our...

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...button-hole; he gave the French
salutation--two flips of the hand in front of the face; he...

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...two bronze skeletons bearing scrolls, and
two great dragons uphold the sarcophagus. On high, amid...

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...few short weeks, I
may therefore as well acknowledge with such apologies as may be due,...

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...we know that he always went flying light in the matter
of baggage. When we...

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...glory to think that for once I have
discovered an ancient painting that is beautiful and...

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...was writing in our front room this afternoon
and trying hard to keep my attention on...

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...cheap wines, instead of wearing gallant coats of mail and
destroying fleets and armies as their...

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...the world turned around was regarded as a
damning heresy by the church; and we know...

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...breastpin, and do it
so deftly and so neatly that any man might think a master...

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...o'clock, one night, and staid lost in that
labyrinth of narrow streets and long rows of...

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...for they say that the policy of the
government is to change the soldiery from one...

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...very carefully, all the
time, under the silly impression that if it is not falling, your...

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...salvation than many masses
purchased of the church and the vowing of many candles to the...

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...board the
ship.

We felt as though we had been away from home an age. We...

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...be quarantined at Naples. Two or three
of us prefer not to run this risk....

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...her treasury almost in a day. She squandered
millions of francs on a navy which...

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...of a hundred thousand inhabitants, there are twelve hundred
priests. Heaven only knows how many...

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... It is the wretchedest, princeliest land on earth.

Look at the grand Duomo of Florence--a...

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...beauty that is in their
productions. I can not help but see it, now and...

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...altogether, I believe. They must
unquestionably love their religion, to suffer so much for it....

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...they only have to grab--if
they do not get the one they are after, they get...

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...or four times and said that in his
opinion it was seditious. That was the...

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...walking where none others have
walked; that you are beholding what human eye has not seen...

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...saw there a country which has no overshadowing Mother Church, and yet
the people survive. ...

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...ask him to feasts, they
invite him to drink complicated beverages; but if he be poor...

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...can practice medicine among Christians;
they can even shake hands with Christians if they choose; they...

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...do not plow with a sharpened stick, nor yet with
a three-cornered block of wood that...

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...in it and about
it was on such a scale of uniform vastness that there were...

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...him, I lost him. The church had lately been
decorated, on the occasion of a...

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...hills upon which Rome is built. He can see the
Tiber, and the locality of...

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...she put them in this pleasant
Inquisition and pointed to the Blessed Redeemer, who was so...

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...saw the Dying Gladiator at the Capitol, and I
think that even we appreciated that wonder...

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...to the gladiatorial combats and
other shows, they sometimes threw members of the hated sect into...

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...high honor of discovering among the rubbish of
the ruined Coliseum the only playbill of that...

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... GRAND BROADSWORD COMBAT!
between...

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...as
news, and therefore I translate and publish it simply to show how very
little the general...

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... handled his weapon with a grace that marked the possession of
...

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... The manager was called before the
curtain and returned his...

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... when he had slain all the sophomores and was dallying with the
...

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...don't you pad
them shanks?" and made use of various...

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...two-horse wagon and put eighteen hundred
pounds of bacon, flour, beans, blasting-powder, picks and shovels in...

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...this makes the roof and the
front of the mansion; the sides and back are the...

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...Milan he or his pupils designed every thing; he designed the
Lake of Como; in Padua,...

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...wretch has tried all the ways he can think
of to make us comprehend that Michael...

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...his
countenance, and look more like an inspired idiot, and throw more
imbecility into the tone of...

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...it. Christopher Colombo
--pleasant name--is--is he dead?"

"Oh, corpo di Baccho!--three hundred year!"

"What did he die...

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...that we were lunatics. The observation
was so innocent and so honest that it amounted...

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...was no satisfaction in
being a Pope in those days. There were too many annoyances....

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... When the French troops came to Rome, and when
Pius...

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...Castle of St.
Angelo; the antiphon Regina Coeli which the Catholic...

Page 209

...looking through eyes that were wider apart or closer
together than they were used to. ...

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...view, out of the complex machinery of a corpse, and
observing, "Now this little nerve quivers--the...

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...dead?"

It makes me dizzy, to think of the Vatican--of its wilderness of statues,
paintings, and curiosities...

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...all. I honestly hope it is, to
others, but certainly it is not to me....

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...stored up all that is curious and beautiful in art; in
our Patent Office is hoarded...

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...human nature.

This is in letters of gold around the apsis of a mosaic group at...

Page 215

...night till sometimes we seemed moldering away
ourselves, and growing defaced and cornerless, and liable at...

Page 216

...we got back to
Naples we had not slept for forty-eight hours. We were just...

Page 217

...of an old woman--to deride,
to hiss, to jeer at an actress they once worshipped, but...

Page 218

...of the
wretchedest of all the religious impostures one can find in Italy--the
miraculous liquefaction of the...

Page 219

...to
be paid and received, there is always some vehement jawing and
gesticulating about it. One...

Page 220

... About this time, the fellow who was
hanging on to the tail of the horse...

Page 221

...But they have good reason to be. The cholera generally
vanquishes a Neapolitan when it...

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...VESUVIUS--CONTINUED.

Naples, with its immediate suburbs, contains six hundred and twenty-five
thousand inhabitants, but I am satisfied...

Page 223

...that this mustang was clerking in a fruit
establishment (he had the establishment along with him...

Page 224

...let us land. The airs these little insect Governments put on are
in the last...

Page 225

...del Cane
and its poisonous vapors, from Pliny down to Smith, and every tourist has
held a...

Page 226

...pirates will carry you to the top in a sedan
chair, if you wish it, but...

Page 227

...in the delicate pink of a new-blown rose.
Where portions of the meadow had sunk, and...

Page 228

...whole
story by myself.




CHAPTER XXXI.

...

Page 229

...Commissioners of Pompeii never attended to
their business, and that if they never mended the pavements...

Page 230

...next a room with a large marble basin
in the midst and the pipes of a...

Page 231

...way in our cities.

Every where, you see things that make you wonder how old these...

Page 232

...ashes: the wine and the oil that once had filled them were
gone with their owners.

In...

Page 233

...found,
with ten pieces of gold in one hand and a large key in the other....

Page 234

...to us now--and
went dreaming among the trees that grow over acres and acres of its...

Page 235

...heads that stretch down the corridors of the Vatican, one thing
strikes me with a force...

Page 236

...with the western horizon all golden from the
sunken sun, and specked with distant ships, the...

Page 237

...himself
about Scriptural localities.--They say the Oracle complains, in this hot
weather, lately, that the only beverage...

Page 238

... In the valley, near the Acropolis, (the square-topped hill before
spoken of,) Athens itself could...

Page 239

...a low hill,
intending to go clear around the Piraeus, out of the range of its...

Page 240

...of country than exists any where else outside of the
State of Nevada, perhaps. Part...

Page 241

...marble, or measure their
height, or guess at their extraordinary thickness, but passed at once
through a...

Page 242

...the centuries that have gone over them and the sieges
they have suffered. The Parthenon,...

Page 243

...place
seemed alive with ghosts. I half expected to see the Athenian heroes of
twenty centuries...

Page 244

...its watch over old Athens, as it had kept
it for twenty-three hundred years, and went...

Page 245

...a parting view of the Parthenon, with the
moonlight streaming through its open colonnades and touching...

Page 246

...of playing some wretched fraud upon them, and
seemed half inclined to scalp the party. ...

Page 247

...ship. We
rowed noiselessly away, and before the police-boat came in sight again,
we were safe...

Page 248

...greatness. The nation numbers only eight hundred thousand
souls, and there is poverty and misery...

Page 249

...born too late to see Noah's ark, and died too
soon to see our menagerie. ...

Page 250

...Marmora and Black
Seas,) and, curving around, divides the city in the middle. Galata and
Pera...

Page 251

...dress too crazy to be indulged
in; no absurdity too absurd to be tolerated; no frenzy...

Page 252

...him sitting on a stone at a corner,
in the midst of the turmoil, sound asleep...

Page 253

...verily so tumbled and distorted were his features
that no man could tell the wart that...

Page 254

...new, and then the
contrast must have been ghastly--if Justinian's architects did not trim
them any. ...

Page 255

...made incredible "time." Most of them spun around forty times in a
minute, and one...

Page 256

...inside, that I have seen
lately. Mahmoud's tomb was covered with a black velvet pall,...

Page 257

...just at present, partly because of a brisk demand created
by the recent return of the...

Page 258

...in Nubians. Slow sale.

"Eunuchs--None offering; however, large cargoes are...

Page 259

...they wanted by determined and ferocious assault; and that at night
they drowned all other sounds...

Page 260

...said. But they don't look it.

They sleep in the streets these days. They...

Page 261

... But they do worse. They hang and kick and stone and
scald these wretched...

Page 262

...a
pestilence is, because they have one occasionally that thins the people
out at the rate of...

Page 263

...of course, and finds nothing in it. They
do say--I do not vouch for it--but...

Page 264

...and years I have promised myself
that I would yet enjoy one. Many and many...

Page 265

...They expected it, no doubt. It belonged in
the list of softening, sensuous influences peculiar...

Page 266

...for a still warmer temperature, they took me
where it was--into a marble room, wet, slippery...

Page 267

...without wasting any time
about it. Then he brought the world-renowned Turkish coffee that poets
have...

Page 268

...can not be helped.
All guides are Fergusons to us. We can not master their...

Page 269

...same motive; I am sure that both enjoyed the
conversation, but never a word of it...

Page 270

...and
discolor the stone.

The battle-fields were pretty close together. The Malakoff tower is on
a hill...

Page 271

... [His
aunt.]

This person gathers mementoes with a perfect recklessness, now-a-days;
mixes them all up together, and...

Page 272

...twenty hours' run from Sebastopol, and is the most
northerly port in the Black Sea. ...

Page 273

...the back country; examined the populace as
far as eyes could do it; and closed the...

Page 274

...begin to feel my fierce desire to converse with a genuine
Emperor cooling down and passing...

Page 275

...gratification, of admiration--and with
one accord, the party must begin to bow--not obsequiously, but
respectfully, and with...

Page 276

...with a heartiness, both
of phrase and expression, that compels belief in their sincerity. As...

Page 277

... I was glad to observe that she wore her
own hair, plaited in thick braids...

Page 278

...lifeless where he
stood, his fall might shake the thrones of half a world! If...

Page 279

...at the Emperor's. In a few minutes,
conversation was under way, as before. The...

Page 280

...served on the centre-tables
in the reception room and the verandahs--anywhere that was convenient;
there was no...

Page 281

...are
strangely like common mortals. They are pleasanter to look upon then
than they are in...

Page 282

...ourselves, was suddenly transformed into anxiety about
what we were going to do with our poet....

Page 283

...I only know by reputation, and whose
moral characters and standing in society I can not...

Page 284

...us, at least--Asia.
We had as yet only acquired a bowing acquaintance with it, through
pleasure excursions...

Page 285

...them a square meal. Adieu! I am happy--I am gratified--I am
delighted--I am bored....

Page 286

...larger than a common closet, and the
whole hive cut up into a maze of alleys...

Page 287

...community of Christians "faithful unto
death." Hers was the only church against which no threats...

Page 288

...that has filled the renowned harbor of Ephesus
and rendered her ancient site deadly and uninhabitable...

Page 289

...and show themselves at the door.
They are all comely of countenance, and exceedingly neat and...

Page 290

...got to Smyrna. These
camels are very much larger than the scrawny specimens one sees...

Page 291

...that the Bible
spoke of them as being very poor--so poor, I thought, and so subject...

Page 292

... "We, the undersigned, claim five claims of two hundred feet each,
...

Page 293

... What could any oyster want to climb a hill for? To climb a...

Page 294

...and left every body drenched through
and through, and melancholy and half-drowned, the ascensionists came down
from...

Page 295

...however. There
were no bridles--nothing but a single rope, tied to the bit. It...

Page 296

...blocks
of marble, wherein, tradition says, St. Paul was imprisoned eighteen
centuries ago. From these old...

Page 297

...in days that seem almost modern, so remote are they from the
early history of this...

Page 298

...it,) is one that lies in this old theatre
of Ephesus which St. Paul's riot has...

Page 299

...of the young men was carrying carelessly, and
they had not time to release him; and...

Page 300

...brass
that was upon his collar remained. They wondered much at these things.
But they took...

Page 301

...these. The Seven said, How,
you know them not? How long have ye dwelt...

Page 302

...Egnog.

Such is the story of the Seven Sleepers, (with slight variations,) and I
know it is...

Page 303

...and
have paid a great sum for that right, need to be protected, and deserve
to be....

Page 304

...Constantinople every body fell to telegraphing the
American Consuls at Alexandria and Beirout to give notice...

Page 305

...to the public. A young gentleman (I
believe he was a Greek,) volunteered to show...

Page 306

...had sore
backs, and likewise raw places and old scales scattered about their
persons like brass nails...

Page 307

...tent, and said we
could put our small trifles in them for convenience, and if we...

Page 308

... "COME LIKE SPIRITS, SO DEPART."

...

Page 309

...have been trying for some
time to think what a camel looks like, and now we...

Page 310

...off or else he
has sat down on it too hard, some time or other, and...

Page 311

... The Sunday-school books exaggerated
it a little. The grapes are most excellent to this...

Page 312

...The building had to be long, because the grave of
the honored old navigator is two...

Page 313

...if you will,
and let me go!" It is a most outrageous state of things.

These...

Page 314

...and columns of Baalbec, a
noble ruin whose history is a sealed book. It has...

Page 315

...It is in a tolerable state of preservation. One
row of nine columns stands almost...

Page 316

...many a century ago. Men like the men of our day could hardly
rear such...

Page 317

...We said the Saviour who
pitied dumb beasts and taught that the ox must be rescued...

Page 318

...fountain called
Figia, because Baalam's ass had drank there once. So we journeyed on,
through the...

Page 319

...terse
language of my note-book will answer for the rest of this day's
experiences:

...

Page 320

...this distressful country. To think of eating three times
every...

Page 321

...you see spread
far below you, with distance to soften it, the sun to glorify it,...

Page 322

...have not gone dry or its fertility failed.
Now we can understand why the city has...

Page 323

...City.

We reached the city gates just at sundown. They do say that one can...

Page 324

...exhausting day's
travel, as it was unexpected--for one can not tell what to expect in a
Turkish...

Page 325

...us by without demanding bucksheesh; the merchants in the
bazaars did not hold up their goods...

Page 326

...he was blind, so "they led him by the hand and brought him to
Damascus." ...

Page 327

... If Ananias did not live there in St.
Paul's time, somebody else did, which is...

Page 328

...think there are no such rivers in all the world as their
little Abana and Pharpar....

Page 329

...the floods of
rays--I thought I could tell when each flood struck my head, when it
reached...

Page 330

...Here, you feel all the time just as if you were
living about the year 1200...

Page 331

...boy without any clothes on, and he holds out his hand and says
"Bucksheesh!"--he don't really...

Page 332

...and rocky
hills, hungry, and with no water to drink. We had drained the goat-skins
dry...

Page 333

...evening drew near, we clambered down the mountain, through
groves of the Biblical oaks of Bashan,...

Page 334

...are well-worn
Greek inscriptions over niches in the rock where in ancient times the
Greeks, and after...

Page 335

...done with any other stranger. I can not comprehend this; the
gods of my understanding...

Page 336

...its nose. The flies were happy, the child was
contented, and so the mother did...

Page 337

...wonder that
even in the desert places about Bethsaida, five thousand invaded His
solitude, and He had...

Page 338

...of apparently
much greater importance.

We satisfied our pilgrims by making those hard rides from Baalbec to
Damascus,...

Page 339

...in the tents, either--they must stay out and take the weather as
it comes. Look...

Page 340

...cars when I am two or three years older.--[The railroad has been
completed since the above...

Page 341

...sources. There is
enough of it to make a farm. It almost warrants the...

Page 342

...into Egypt," where Mary and the
Young Child are riding and Joseph is walking alongside, towering...

Page 343

...treated uncivilly, but then in about every other chapter he
discovered them approaching, any how, and...

Page 344

...sally forth against
another King Jabin who had been doing something. Barak came down from
Mount...

Page 345

... "I will bring the land into desolation; and your enemies which dwell
...

Page 346

...square and contained two
thousand souls. The combined monarchies of the thirty "kings" destroyed
by Joshua...

Page 347

...sunned themselves. Where
prosperity has reigned, and fallen; where glory has flamed, and gone out;
where...

Page 348

...I don't think
the Colonel ought to, either. But he did; he told us at...

Page 349

... This is a ruined
Khan of the Middle Ages, in one of whose side courts...

Page 350

...boy, and
stripped the hated coat from his back and pushed him into the pit. ...

Page 351

...After
thirteen years of romantic mystery, the brethren who had wronged Joseph,
came, strangers in a strange...

Page 352

...so happy ever since they touched holy ground that they
did little but mutter incoherent rhapsodies,...

Page 353

...Bethsaida, yonder, and to the mouth of Jordan, and to
the place where the swine ran...

Page 354

...the water for want of the means of passing over it.

How the pilgrims abused each...

Page 355

...me till I walked out of Damascus on my own feet or was carried
out in...

Page 356

...gratifying to the
pilgrims, for, as usual, they fit the eternal words of gods to the
evanescent...

Page 357

...and so, and is not his
mother the person they call Mary? This is absurd."...

Page 358

...with cannon-balls, and imparts to it a very warlike aspect. When
the artist has arranged...

Page 359

...bucksheesh out to sore-eyed children and brown, buxom
girls with repulsively tattooed lips and chins, we...

Page 360

...These were
fluted, once, and yet, although the stone is about as hard as iron, the
flutings...

Page 361

...splendor of noon; when the still surface is belted
like a rainbow with broad bars of...

Page 362

... can not say enough, nor can I imagine where those travelers carried
...

Page 363

...the ribbons and the flowers be stripped from it, a
skeleton will be found beneath.

So stripped,...

Page 364

...its soft note; the crested
lark sends up its song toward...

Page 365

...truth be spoken of this region? Is the truth
harmful? Has it ever needed...

Page 366

...Since I made my last few notes, I have
been sitting outside the tent for half...

Page 367

..."The Land and the Book," and other literature of like
description--no fishing-tackle. There were no...

Page 368

...scimitar of such awful dimensions and such
implacable expression that no man might hope to look...

Page 369

...rode to the front and struck up an acquaintance with King
Solomon-in-all-his-glory, and got him to...

Page 370

...declivity down which the swine ran to the sea; the
entrance and the exit of the...

Page 371

...or their goods when Saladin demanded them. This
conduct of an insolent petty chieftain stung...

Page 372

...lawless hordes of Bedouins. Tabor stands solitary and
alone, a giant sentinel above the Plain...

Page 373

...meditating over ancient crumbling tombs, whose marble columns were
marred and broken purposely by the modern...

Page 374

...its strong outlines sharply cut against ocean
and sky; and over all, vagrant shreds and flakes...

Page 375

...followed a hilly,
rocky road to Nazareth--distant two hours. All distances in the East are
measured...

Page 376

...to jump over upwards of
eighteen hundred donkeys, and only one person in the party was...

Page 377

...children of
every house, and city, and obscure hamlet of the furthest lands of
Christendom; a spot...

Page 378

...of. When the Virgin
fled from Herod's wrath, she hid in a grotto in Bethlehem,...

Page 379

... Relics are very good property.
Travelers are expected to pay for seeing them, and they...

Page 380

...tall, graceful girl! what Madonna-like gracefulness of queenly beauty!"

The verdicts were all in. It...

Page 381

...quote from Grimes, because he is so dramatic. And because he
is so romantic. ...

Page 382

... could not find who was responsible, I would whip them all,...

Page 383

...inches long and
tapering gradually from an inch in diameter to...

Page 384

...weakened. Let him who would sneer
at my emotion close...

Page 385

...bystanders praise God.

"Chapter 16. Christ miraculously widens or contracts...

Page 386

...grown to a perfect state, it takes up the nest in which
...

Page 387

...narrow path the horse had to poise
himself nicely on a rude stone step and then...

Page 388

...of the Plain, we rode a little way up a
hill and found ourselves at Endor,...

Page 389

...day, and were burning up with
thirst. It was at this time, and under these...

Page 390

...glorified God, saying, That
a great prophet is risen up among...

Page 391

...flies; no besotted ignorance in the countenances; no raw
places on the donkeys' backs; no disagreeable...

Page 392

...to ask the woman, but it does not seem so to
me now. The woman...

Page 393

...it reverted to himself or
his heirs again at the next jubilee year. So this...

Page 394

...the family, and rested from his
labors, until he was come near to Samaria, where he...

Page 395

...magnificent city of this place, and a great
number of coarse limestone columns, twenty feet high...

Page 396

...and hurry on. At
two o'clock we stopped to lunch and rest at ancient Shechem,...

Page 397

...fascination, just as one would stare at a living mastodon, or a
megatherium that had moved...

Page 398

...Egypt felt his influence--the
world knows his history."

In this same "parcel of ground" which Jacob bought...

Page 399

...and started once
more. Thus are people persecuted by dragomen, whose sole ambition in
life is...

Page 400

...spurred up hill after hill, and usually
began to stretch our necks minutes before we got...

Page 401

...as a prison door is with
bolt-heads. Every house has from one to half a...

Page 402

...symbols that indicate the presence of
Moslem rule more surely than the crescent-flag itself, abound. ...

Page 403

...it hang some fifty gold and silver lamps, which are kept always
burning, and the place...

Page 404

...Jerusalem. The wise priests ordered that the three
crosses be taken to her bedside one...

Page 405

...sword of that stout
Crusader, Godfrey of Bulloigne--King Godfrey of Jerusalem. No blade in
Christendom wields...

Page 406

...of the Holy Sepulchre we
came to a small chapel, hewn out of the rock--a place...

Page 407

...these
are not to be set aside by the idle tongues of cavilers. To such...

Page 408

... But let us try to bear it with fortitude.
Let us trust that he is...

Page 409

...a cavern which cavilers say was once a cistern.
It is a chapel, now, however--the Chapel...

Page 410

...appeared suddenly and as suddenly disappeared, or drifted
mysteriously hither and thither about the distant aisles...

Page 411

...Mary stood, in
another part of the church, and where John stood, and Mary Magdalen;
where the...

Page 412

...fought and where Warren fell. The
crucifixion of Christ was too notable an event in...

Page 413

...at the princely fortune in precious gems and jewelry that hangs so
thickly about the form...

Page 414

...second time, and where the mob refused to give
him up, and said, "Let his blood...

Page 415

...a house--a stone that was so seamed and scarred
that it bore a sort of grotesque...

Page 416

...destruction to the cities of Arabia, and then turned against him,
hoping in this way to...

Page 417

...then it is hard to break habits one has been eighteen
hundred years accustomed to. ...

Page 418

...are to be
seen in that rock to-day.

This rock, large as it is, is suspended in...

Page 419

...tying threads around his finger by way of reminders.

Just outside the mosque is a miniature...

Page 420

...Temple; they supported it. There are
ponderous archways down there, also, over which the destroying...

Page 421

...himself on.

We descended to the canon again, and then the guide began to give name
and...

Page 422

...the Tomb of the
Virgin, both of which we had seen before. It is not...

Page 423

...upon them
regretfully because we have forgotten our punishments at school, and how
we grieved when our...

Page 424

...one is
traveling in Europe, the daily incidents seem all alike; but when he has
placed them...

Page 425

...the cool courage of the pilgrims, their
strength of numbers and imposing display of war material,...

Page 426

...they get him
confused with that Lazarus who had no merit but his virtue, and virtue
never...

Page 427

...my blood run cold to think of it.
Another was going to scalp such Bedouins as...

Page 428

...it seven times, some three thousand years ago, and blew it down
with his trumpet, he...

Page 429

... To Canaan's fair and happy land,
...

Page 430

...our
wading experience, however, that many streets in America are double as
wide as the Jordan.

Daylight came,...

Page 431

...variety in that respect. We didn't smell, there on the Jordan, the
same as we...

Page 432

...shores of
the lake. In places they coat the ground like a brilliant crust of...

Page 433

...sees in fanciful pictures of Belshazzar's Feast
and the palaces of the ancient Pharaohs. No...

Page 434

...is, they thought all those fine things afterwards.
One's first thought is not likely to be...

Page 435

...owe, to the Convent Fathers
in Palestine. Their doors are always open, and there is...

Page 436

...in the floor bears a Latin inscription to
that effect. It is polished with the...

Page 437

...we wot of.

We got away from Bethlehem and its troops of beggars and relic-peddlers
in the...

Page 438

...the holy places; we think in bed, afterwards, when
the glare, and the noise, and the...

Page 439

...two or three hours finished, we and the tired horses could have
rest and sleep as...

Page 440

...aspects of nature, for
we should have been disappointed--at least at this season of the year....

Page 441

...Israel entered the Promised Land with
songs of rejoicing, one finds only a squalid camp of...

Page 442

...and distinct strain on it
--and feel the temporary contentment that is born of the banishment...

Page 443

...was night by this time, and the other passengers were
content to remain at home and...

Page 444

...tried to break a fragment off the upright Needle and
could not do it; he tried...

Page 445

...to get away from hated
Jaffa. They had little to hope for. Because after...

Page 446

...been in one just like it in America and survived:

I...

Page 447

...man want
to illuminate the house?--does he want to get up...

Page 448

...now don't you think you
could get me something to read?"

...

Page 449

...put an armful
of books on the bed and said "Good...

Page 450

...the hotel was
full of English people bound overland to India and officers getting
ready for the...

Page 451

...will properly flood the land at forty and produce plenty,
or whether it will rise to...

Page 452

...which rose
upward, step above step, narrowing as it went, till it tapered to a point
far...

Page 453

...which threatened to batter my whole political
economy to wreck and ruin.

Twice, for one minute, they...

Page 454

...I said let the Arab and his exploits go to the mischief.
But stay. The...

Page 455

...fair way to win, now, for it was a dazzling opportunity for an
Arab. He...

Page 456

...headed us off. A sheik, in flowing white bournous and gaudy
head-gear, was with them....

Page 457

... I remembered how I worked with another boy, at odd afternoons
stolen from study and...

Page 458

...had noted; of the joy and sorrow, the life and death, the
grandeur and decay, of...

Page 459

...and a
hundred and two feet around the head, if I remember rightly--carved out
of one solid...

Page 460

...and exaggerated, of the Oriental cities I have already
spoken of; I shall not tell of...

Page 461

...speak a word of any of these things, or write a
line. They shall be...

Page 462

...We naturally settled down into a
very slow, stay-at-home manner of life, and resolved to be...

Page 463

...away by the wind. At last Harry caught him. Sea full of
...

Page 464

...familiar and home-like."

It reminds me of the journal I opened with the New Year, once,...

Page 465

...in a noisy public meeting in the main cabin
that we could not go to Lisbon,...

Page 466

...and looked, we abused the man
who invented quarantine, we held half a dozen mass-meetings and...

Page 467

...his leg broke at the ancle. It was our first serious
misfortune. We had...

Page 468

...would be a just and righteous thing to go down and
write a kind word for...

Page 469

... chiefly composed of rusty old bachelors and a child of six years.
...

Page 470

...long ago, (it seems an
age.) quadrilles, of a single set,...

Page 471

...us had ever
been any where before; we all hailed from...

Page 472

...language. One of our
passengers said to a shopkeeper, in...

Page 473

...of
business as we gave them and survive.

...

Page 474

...that certain of the great works of the old masters
were...

Page 475

...about any place at all. We wanted to go
home....

Page 476

...cruise again, nothing
could gratify me more than to be a passenger. With the same...

Page 477

...returned to it. Whenever we made a land journey, we estimated
how many days we...

Page 478

...Gibraltar glorified with the rich coloring of a Spanish sunset
and swimming in a sea of...