The Gilded Age, Part 7.

By Mark Twain

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...THE GILDED AGE

A Tale of Today

by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

1873


Part 7.



CHAPTER LV.

Henry Brierly...

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...stammered and looked at the judge. "You must answer,
sir," said His Honor.

"She--she--didn't accept me."

"No....

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...the house, I goes in--and I says,
"Missis did you ring?" She was a standin'...

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...of twelve men of rare intelligence, whose acute minds would
unravel all the sophistries of the...

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...of agony. She knows that her
father lives. Who is he, where is he?...

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...become again the mistress of his passion.
Gentlemen, do you wonder if this woman, thus pursued,...

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...purpose evidently is to open the door to a mass of irrelevant
testimony, the object of...

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...could kill him.

"You mean," said Mr. Braham, "that there was an unnatural, insane gleam
in her...

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...was my own, sir. It's Major Lackland's. I was knowing to these
letters when Judge Hawkins...

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...Court entirely withdrawn from him, thought
he perceived here his opportunity, turning and beaming upon the...

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...of silence, an appreciation of the situation
gradually stole over the, audience, and an explosion of...

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...another day in the examination of experts
refuting the notion of insanity. These causes might have...

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...human being. Gentlemen, the life of this lovely and once
happy girl, this now stricken...

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...of
the University bill was now imperative.

The Court waited, for, some time, but the jury gave...

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...and a nolle prosequi, and there you are! That's the routine, and
it's no trick...

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...the dinners I am invited to, I reckon I'd wear
my teeth down level with my...

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...fix it--and so he has. But I claim no credit for that--if I
stiffened up...

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...to
pay the expense of prosecuting this infamous traitor for bribery. The
whole legislature was stricken...

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...the poor girl now. Oh, I wish with all my soul they would hang...

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...surrounded Laura who, calmer
than anyone else, was supporting her aged mother, who had almost fainted
from...

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...its way.
As in the stupor of a sudden calamity, and not fully comprehending it,
Mrs. Hawkins...

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...other friends,
amid the congratulations of those assembled, and was cheered as she
entered a carriage, and...

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...to plan great enterprises and the pluck to carry them
through. That was his reputation,...

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... Everything promised
splendidly, but there was a little delay. Could Phil let him have...

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...man who might not rather easily fall into temptation.
One looking for a real hero would...

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...remains have demanded an investigation. This
sounds fine and bold...

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...$50,000 and had not yet
denied the charge) said that, "the presence in the Capital of...

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...did not believe Dilworthy was going to be elected;
Dilworthy showed a list of men who...

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...he
desired in return was that when the balloting began, Noble should cast
his vote for him...

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...a bad man, an evil-minded man, but his inexperience of such had
blinded him to his...

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...truth of every detail
of my statement I solemnly swear, and I call Him to witness...

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...conveyed to a distant town and delivered to
another party. It is not customary to...

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...but
honorable men in its body. If this Senator had yielded to temptation and
had offered...

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...paid several thousand dollars extra for work previously done,
under an accepted contract, and already paid...

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...career. As far as
the long highway receded over the plain of her life, it...

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...a time when one is filled with vague
longings; when one dreams of flight to peaceful...

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...behind her and impatient multitudes awaiting her coming.
Her life, during one hour of each day,...

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...hardly force her way to the hall! She reached the
ante-room, threw off her wraps...

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...every species of insulting epithet;
they thronged after the carriage, hooting, jeering, cursing, and even
assailing the...

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...it with mellow light; by
and by the darkness swallowed it up, and later the gray...

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...household with its burden of labors and cares.

Washington Hawkins had scarcely more than entered upon...

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...certain to be stolen."

"Why?"

"Why? Why, aren't trunks always being stolen?"

"Well, yes--some kinds of trunks...

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...as long as he lived, and never a curse like it
was inflicted upon any man's...

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...what you do,'
says he, 'you go into the law, Col. Sellers--go into the law, sir;...

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...shall go for taxes," he said, "and never tempt me or mine any more!"

He opened...

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...coal is, limestone with these fossils in it is pretty certain to
lie against its foot...

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...That is what
the boys say. Now we want to put in one parting blast...

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...hope.

Tim staid with him till the last moment, and then took up his job at...

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...thought, and continued his journey--such a coat as that could be of
little use in a...

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...such as that which spreads
a dainty banquet for the man who has no appetite. ...

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...was full of foreboding. He fell at length into a restless doze.
There was a...

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...where Ruth lay. "Oh,"
said her mother, "if she were only in her cool and...

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...watching the least sign of resolution in her face, Ruth
was able to whisper,

"I so want...

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...Small did not quarrel however. They both attacked Mr. Bolton
behind his back as a...

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...seem wise to harass and excite the reader to no
purpose.

THE AUTHORS...