The Gilded Age, Part 6.

By Mark Twain

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...THE GILDED AGE

A Tale of Today

by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

1873


Part 6.




CHAPTER XLVI.

Philip left...

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...a servant and said, "Tell Miss
Laura that we are waiting to see her. I...

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... Yours, L. H."

"Confound it," said Phillip, "the noodle has fallen...

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... SHOCKING MURDER!!!

...

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...going to Europe, and I
ought to just say good by."

...

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... substance of it was that his murderess is a Miss Laura Hawkins,...

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...it on the floor.

Further particulars with full biographies of all...

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...worked up in
column after column. There were sketches, biographical and historical.
There were long "specials"...

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...of
the parties was discussed, the dozen different theories of the motive,
broached in the newspapers, were...

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...that Harry was released, on giving
bonds to appear as a witness when wanted. His...

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...dear,
cheer up;" and the Colonel broke down entirely.

"But," he went on, "we'll stand by you....

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...History never repeats itself, but the Kaleidoscopic combinations of
the pictured...

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...its ruin in our resolute
exposure of the Great Frauds; we...

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...too
fond of gaiety, and neglectful of the externals of religion, but a woman
of principle. ...

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...to see her.

Philip, to keep him from some new foolishness, persuaded him to go with
him...

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...for
reform. Things have got pretty mixed when a legislature will give away a
United States...

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...to-day. I hope thee will have nothing more to
do with him."

"He has been very...

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...name in the papers. Is this
woman a specimen of your western friends?"

"My only assistance,"...

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...not like to go without some assurance from
Ruth that she might perhaps love him some...

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...work for all concerned in it. As the tunnel advanced
into the rock every day...

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...Every week we
can gain, said the learned counsel, Braham, improves our chances. The
popular rage...

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...comfort of it,"
said Philip. They came back in the course of an hour, satisfied...

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...incumbrance on it.

He had come home that day early, unusually dejected.

"I am afraid," he said...

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...from the office. Mr. Bolton
took his letters listlessly, dreading to open them. He...

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...had been so foolish as
to send the news to Philadelphia before he knew what he...

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...occur to
relieve me. At any rate we must not give up the mine, so...

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...to do; he was like Adam;
the world was all before him whereto choose. He...

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...and probably
never into the East Tennessee Land scheme, and he would not now be
detained in...

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...the Squire about an occupation. He was determined now
to waste no more time in...

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...not in love
and never spoke of the possibility of her own marriage, it was a
transient...

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...elect them. Perhaps," continued Philip with a
smile, "the women will have to vote."

"Well, I...

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...the Squire, "do you mean to abandon your land in
Pennsylvania?" This track of land...

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...elated with the prospect of
Philip's renewal of his mining enterprise.

But Philip was exultant. He...

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...power, which ought to precede a union of two hearts,
might be pushed too far. ...

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...I think we can feel very
well satisfied. Even in these days, when people growl...

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...necessarily. Did it last year? It never does. That would not be
regular."

"Then...

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...just say, 'Charge not proven.' It
leaves the accused is a kind of a shaky...

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...trouble. I am so miserable, these days!"

The Colonel made Washington get up and walk...

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...What are you wilting down like that, for? You mustn't be a
girl, you know."

"Oh,...

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...but for the relieving change which they got out of am
occasional visit to New York...

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...out at gatherings for the benefit of the negro, gatherings for
the benefit of the Indian,...

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...the lion in me
is roused--and I say here I stand, solitary and alone, but unflinching,
unquailing,...

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...a United States Senator was a vast, vague
colossus, an awe inspiring unreality.

Next day everybody was...

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...to find utterance.

Senator Dilworthy rose and beamed upon the assemblage for a full minute
in silence....

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...be useful; to learn to be pious; to learn to be great and
glorious men and...

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...him from all harm; he remembered the fate of the bad
little boy who used to...

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...was committed had all conspired to fix the event in the public
mind, although nearly three...

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... Without, the throng occupied all the seats, the window ledges and
the standing room. ...

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...became the office and errand boy of a law firm,
picked up knowledge enough to get...

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...carving knife,
bowie knife, pen knife, rolling pin, car, hook, dagger, hair pin, with a
hammer, with...

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...laborer. Have neither formed nor expressed an opinion.
Never had heard of the case. ...

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...of animal cunning, while the
most were only stupid. The entire panel formed that boasted...