The Gilded Age, Part 5.

By Mark Twain

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...THE GILDED AGE

A Tale of Today

by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

1873


Part 5.




CHAPTER XXXVII.


That Chairman...

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...state that weigh you down. For your own sake, as well
as for the sake...

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...kind to refuse, since it troubles you so, and so I
restore it. But if...

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...There is no hurry; I shall
come out winner, all in good time. She is...

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... Her house was one of the most popular in
Washington. There was less ostentation...

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...it very warm to-day, Mr. Hawkins?" said Blanche, by way
of a remark.

"It's awful hot," said...

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...grayish hair and whiskers, and he
walked with a cane, as if he were slightly lame....

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...thought she
might be mistaken. He might come back to her. Perhaps he loved...

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...of loading and firing it.

During the morning Laura drove down to Mrs. Schoonmaker's to pay...

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...were many others in Washington on the same errand, some of
them with claims as difficult...

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...he had wronged, if he had
only been forewarned. He felt now that he must...

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...loved you yet! Suppose I hated my fate!
What can I do? I am...

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...to instill into Laura that deep Christian principle which had
been somehow omitted in her training....

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... Open your ears; for which of you will stop,
...

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...he would have luxuriated in the irresponsible
omniscience of the Special Correspondent.

Col. Sellers knew the President...

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...putting the old flag on all the vacant lots. I said to
the President, says...

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...have to yield."

It may have been after a conversation between the Colonel and Senator
Dilworthy that...

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...to give him a little lift. He lacks enterprise--now, about that
Columbus River. He...

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...as he was, fearing to break with her, and half
the time unwilling to give her...

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...her in public.

"Why do you treat me so?" he once said, reproachfully.

"Treat you how?" asked...

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...Selby is going abroad very soon."

Laura started; in spite of her self-control.

"And his wife!--Does he...

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...Laura was going clearly enough, though he did
not believe the worst he heard of her....

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...it, and told Philip all he knew
about the Selby affair, and Laura's treatment of him,...

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...to share to any great
extent the burden with her. She was clear, decisive and...

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...have this influence, which is like an emanation. They bring
peace to a house, they...

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...bill. He urged her not to attempt to influence Mr. Trollop in any
way, and...

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...want Mr. Trollop to make his great speech on the Pension bill."

"Do you? But...

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...keep quiet and not
molest us, I would feel perfectly cheerful and content. But perhaps
there...

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...for
it? Was that what you wanted to see me about?"

"Your instinct is correct. ...

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...there; but here it is out of place. My dear sir, by and by...

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...in
this or the next session. You do not deny that, even in public. ...

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...Bill desire them
very much. I think you ought to let them have them."

"Miss Hawkins,...

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...not spring to his feet and smite his brow with his hand
while a cold sweat...

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...in the Globe, showing the connection between its
bracketed hiatus and my Fragment; and I give...

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...to get that."

She called him back, and said:

"I value your vote, Mr. Trollop, but I...

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...and thought it all over--something
after this fashion: it is about the shape it might have...

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...before I
suffocate!"

"No matter, it's true anyway. Now we can march into Congress with drums
beating...

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...and
by the time they had resumed their seats, the line which they had
delivered to the...

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...it could do some good; but instead, no
provision is made there for the protection of...

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...you get his
paper to persecute us, too?"

"It isn't worth while, my, daughter. His support...

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...people against the bill, and
the report is without doubt a shameless invention."

Next day:

"With characteristic treachery,...

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...his statements, and held the other half
under advisement for confirmation.

Philip in this case could not...

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...talking of national and even international
affairs, as familiarly as neighbors at home talk of poor...

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...to get the Colonel off from these large themes when he
was once started, but Philip...

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...she heard of Col. Selby's proposed departure alarmed her more than
anything else, and she calmly...

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...bluntness," he continued, "but would the knowledge of
his love; would his devotion, make any difference...

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...were going to take the ordinary course
afterward; it would be like getting excited over the...

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... ...

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...five years the increase in local wealth would not only reimburse the
government for the outlay...

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...to see the day, when the youth of the
south would resort to its mines, its...

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...some sharpened pencils indolently;
some scribbled aimlessly; some yawned and stretched; a great many lay
upon their...

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...gavel vigorously)--"It is moved and
seconded that the House do now adjourn. All those in...

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...furled his tent like the Arab.
He said:

"Bless my soul, I'm so absent-minded when I, get...

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...that not
even a voice was raised to interpose an adjournment. The enemy were
totally demoralized....

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...two"

Then he vent to bed. But he could not sleep; so he got up...