The Gilded Age, Part 4.

By Mark Twain

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...THE GILDED AGE

A Tale of Today

by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

1873


Part 4.




CHAPTER XXVIII.

Whatever may...

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...Haven't you paid the men?"

"Paid them! How are we going to pay them when...

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...clasped his forehead, and kept
saying, "Oh, it is, too bad, too bad, too bad! ...

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...to keep the papers all light or you are gone up, you
know. Oh, my...

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...a cent; just filled them up with
champagne and the fat of the land, put pen,...

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...their babies
--I even made it a point to be on good terms with their lackeys....

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...that service, none of that $10,000 would ever have reached
New York."

"If you hadn't levied the...

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...to go out of the room to hide the tears that
nothing could keep back now.

There...

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...Bolton had commissioned him to examine.

On the last day of the journey as the railway...

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...himself, reached the bell rope, "Damn you, I'll learn you,"
stepped to the door and called...

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...have not learned. Conductor
Slum is one of the most...

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...to have
offered the lady his seat, to have rescued her from an accident, perhaps
from death?...

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...little adventure was that Philip did not reach Ilium
till daylight the next morning, when he...

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...into
the open air to wait for breakfast.

The country he saw was wild but not picturesque....

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...siege
of regular boarders, Greeks and others.

The land that Philip had come to look at was...

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...hold of this matter, I may look for that
invitation to his house at, any moment....

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...the sights of the capital. Laura thought the
thing over. At first she was...

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...but one--and if he would not take the
other she would not go with him. ...

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...Injun to himself, and I suppose that
Senator Dilworthy feels that there is nothing left him...

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...Alice appear to be present
when she is absent?"

"Alice has some human feeling, anyway. She...

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...a hero. He did not know out of what materials a
woman can construct a...

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...bred a physician, and practiced a little
before he went into Wall street. I always...

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...about this, he always took refuge with Alice, who was never
moody, and who generally laughed...

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...have been his first choice
for the excursion. But he was none the less chagrined,...

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...of him. But it was only for an instant; the
pressure behind was too great,...

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...brought all the women
whom she had seen since she left home under sharp inspection, and...

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...him--it
was plain that she was going to be a peerless missionary in the field of
labor...

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...of the crowd swept her beyond his reach.

"Now what can the girl mean? Of...

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...just a trifle more at home in
it than he was himself. And now his...

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... He feared he had "missed a trick," as he expressed it.

He only found one...

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...their
cards to the servant at the door by way of introduction. They come
singly, sometimes;...

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...was of a pattern with all she received
from that limb of the aristocracy afterward. ...

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...and lonely to be so far from your home and friends,
Miss Hawkins?"

"I do find it...

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...Hon. Mrs. Oliver Higgins,
the Hon. Mrs. Patrique Oreille (pronounced O-relay,) Miss Bridget
(pronounced Breezhay) Oreille, Mrs....

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...many natives of that city of pronouncing saw
and law as if they were spelt sawr...

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...of capital to conduct it with. This gave him fame
and great respectability. The...

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...thing, and not finding it a difficult thing to
do, either, because nature had originally given...

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...getting a little common. I have some elegant ones--not as
elegant as yours, though--but of...

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...week, and she recommended Key West.
I told her Percy couldn't abide winds, as he was...

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...8 in the evening. Of course we
were all distracted in a moment--everybody was flying...

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...One afternoon he had a fit, and
jumped up and run out on the portico of...

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...and
their extraordinary talk, the more offensive they seemed to her; and yet
she confessed that if...

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...was fair
play," and that to parry an offensive thrust with a sarcasm was a neat
and...

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...the Colonel's
greatest satisfactions was to go over his accounts and note what a
handsome sum this...

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...influencing votes, Senator Dilworthy
was unwilling to have so noble a charity sullied by any taint...

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...and compelled their applause; he
overheard people say he was exceedingly bright--they were chiefly mammas
and marriageable...

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...now--does
that satisfy you?"

"Splendid! I can wait. I can wait patiently--ever so patiently. ...

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...the Senator beamed with his own congressional wit.

"In the committee of the whole things are...

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...the salvation of his fellow
men."

The Senator spoke with feeling, and then added,

"I hope you showed...

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... "With me!"

"There, there, child. I meant nothing, Balloon talks a little freely
sometimes, with...

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.... I should think so . . . .'m . ....

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...real: talent among our
public men of to-day than there was among those of old times--a...

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...Senator or
a Representative but they do not know it is wrong, and so they are...

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...translation."

"Oh! Yes--yes--I remember, now. We are expecting it every day. It
isn't out...

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...thing!--I've read it four times,
ma'm, and I can laugh at the very sight of it...

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...tone.

"Yes, indeed. Many people would think that what a bookseller--or perhaps
his clerk--knows about literature...

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...the hands slowly till they reached
the precise spot without accident or loss of life, and...