The Gilded Age, Part 3.

By Mark Twain

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...THE GILDED AGE

A Tale of Today

by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

1873


Part 3.




CHAPTER XIX.

Mr. Harry...

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... Common thing, I assure you in Washington; the
wives of senators, representatives, cabinet officers, all...

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...I was full of
plans. But experience sobers a man, I never touch any thing...

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...never dreamed that he was merely being experimented on; he
was to her a man of...

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...away? The only person
in Hawkeye who understands me."

"But you refuse to understand me," replied...

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...scheme, would it be likely to take
him from home to Jefferson City; or to Washington,...

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...him. He saw at once that
she was older than Harry, and soon made up...

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...who, in a
manner, gave him the freedom of the city.

"You are known here, sir," said...

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...just it;
you can't make his soul too immortal, but I wouldn't touch him, himself.
Yes, sir!...

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...of private purity, if we were to have any public morality.
"I trust," he said, "that...

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...an interest.

But he saw that the Senator was wounded by the suggestion.

"You will offend me...

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...commendation at least did one service
for him, it elevated him in the opinion of Hawkeye.

Laura...

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... O lift your natures up:
...

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...not write that, for he had the instinct to
know that this was not the extrication...

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...had intended to come over in
the Mayflower, but were detained at Delft Haven by the...

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...open and strewn with music; and there were
photographs and little souvenirs here and there of...

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...sewed when she could
avoid it. Bless her.

"Oh yes, we are old friends. Philip...

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...serious profession from the highest motives. Alice liked
society well enough, she thought, but there...

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...to the noble and gentlemanly clerk if he is
allowed to depart with his scalp safe.

The...

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...apiece in the suburbs of the
Landing ought to do a congressman, but I reckon you'll...

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...a great friend of Harry's, who is always trying to build a
house by beginning at...

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...York," and "opera," and
"reception," and knew that Harry was giving his imagination full range in
the...

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...hoped," said Philip; "to get a little start in connection with this
new railroad, and make...

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...to go down into Arizona in a big
diamond interest. I told them, no, no...

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...when Philip showed by his manner that he was not pleased, Ruth
laughed merrily enough and...

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... "O see ye not yon narrow road
...

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...into the Senate with the remark
that he knew, personally, the signers of it, that they...

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...make either reputation or money
as an engineer, he had a great deal of hard study...

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...You cannot
well arrive at a pleasant intermediate hour, because the railway
corporation that keeps the keys...

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...that by the original estimates it was
to cost $12,000,000, and that the government did come...

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...a squat yellow temple which your eye dwells
upon lovingly through a blur of unmanly moisture,...

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...the mud a
little more and use them for canals.

If you inquire around a little, you...

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...board them.
There are thousands of these employees, and they have gathered there from
every corner of...

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...before him or sat at the Senator's table, solidified into
palpable flesh and blood; famous statesmen...

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...Mr. Dilworthy's struggles with a stubborn majority in his own
Committee in the Senate; of how...

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...not thin it's a fact, anyway,
they say, 'Come, now, but do you really believe that?'...

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...at the very lowest figure, because it is always
best to be on the safe side--half...

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...not come. Harry said he had written to hurry up the
money and it would...

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..."Napoleon Weekly Telegraph and Literary
Repository"--a paper with a Latin motto from the Unabridged dictionary,
and plenty...

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...time as
Providence should appoint.




CHAPTER XXVI.

Rumors of Ruth's frivolity and worldliness at Fallkill traveled to
Philadelphia in...

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...and infusing into it something of the motion and sparkle which were
so agreeable at Fallkill....

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...profession and am as
independent as he is. Then my love would be a free...

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...on it for the
northern road, I wouldn't mind taking an interest, if Pennybacker is
willing; but...

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...found herself falling more and more into
reveries, and growing weary of things as they were....

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..."as if I were living in a house of
cards."

"And thee would like to turn it...

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...thousand dollars. Only ten, and he was sure of a fortune.
Without it he was...

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...but I have. But anyway, the longer it's
delayed, the nearer it grows to the...

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...a moment--just figure up
a little on the future dead moral certainties. For instance, call...

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... Next is the sassparilla region.
I reckon there's enough of that truck along in there...

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...the time. And here we go, now,
just as straight as a string for Hallelujah--it's...