The Gilded Age, Part 2.

By Mark Twain

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...THE GILDED AGE

A Tale of Today

by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

1873


Part 2.



CHAPTER X.

Only two...

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...held her peace. She soon gathered that Major Lackland's
memoranda seemed to refer to letters...

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...It is
this: his lost memory returns to him when he...

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...bore the latest date of all, contained this clause:

"It is...

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...piece of good luck can afford.
She had more than her rightful share of practical good...

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...the fire and talked long and
earnestly about Laura's history and the letters. But it...

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...day a friend overheard a conversation like this:
--and naturally came and told her all about...

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...and patted her foot
more indignantly than ever.



CHAPTER XI

Two months had gone by and the Hawkins...

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...stranger, not to say awe inspiring.]--stand off the cat's tail,
child, can't you see what you're...

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...one little operation on hand that--take some more
water--help yourself, won't you?--help yourself, there's plenty of...

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...among friends that I am better read up in most
sciences, maybe, than the general run...

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...his heart. The other matter that disturbed him was
the dire inflation that had begun...

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...and success in
all his wide horizon. He is embarrassed which to choose, and is...

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...lay his hand on a woman with the exception named; but he learned
afterwards that the...

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...him well enough as a science, but he never could discover a
practical case where it...

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...and take it to the editor of the Daily Grapevine,
and see what he could get...

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...go to
St. Jo?"

"I think I should like it of all things," replied Philip, with some
hesitation,...

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...from his bed-room, to Henry, "where is
St. Jo.?"

"Why, it's in Missouri somewhere, on the frontier...

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... ...

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...Alton and the steamboat from there to St. Louis,
for the change and to have a...

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...travelers
left Chicago. It was a genial spring day when they landed at St. Louis;
the...

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...a cigar, and sit down at the table to "lay out
a line," with the most...

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...in on the Mobile
custom house, work up the Washington end of it; he said there...

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...home there when I run down from Hawkeye--my
plantation is in Hawkeye, a little up in...

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...There. That's the stuff. My respects!"

The hospitable gentleman, having disposed of his liquor,...

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...of it that made
Ruth a little restless, satisfied neither with the out-doors nor the
in-doors. ...

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... I heard father tell cousin Abner that he was
whipped so often for whistling when...

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...any body? If they were orphans, would they like to be
brought up in a...

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...for him to do something. Is he going to start a
daily newspaper among the...

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...about a career, I suppose it is a career
thee wants?"

Ruth did not reply directly; she...

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...her enfeebled childhood, and thee
knows how strong her will is, and what she has been...

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...lived by
getting the rest of the world into schemes. Mr. Bolton never could say
"no"...

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...that he was or could be
embarrassed, than to say that a brass counterfeit dollar-piece would
change...

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...swift judgment of women, with no consideration of the
extenuating circumstances. Mr. Bigler had no...

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...quite as
ready as their sisters, in emergencies, to "call a man."

If Ruth had any exaggerated...

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...her mind than her own will.

The janitor of the shabby and comfortless old building admitted...

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...and asserted
an ugly life-likeness that was frightful.

Ruth was as pale as the white sheet, and...

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...he got
brief ones in reply, full of sharp little observations however, such as
one concerning Col....

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...right opening."

"Well, that's something, that's something, fifteen or twenty thousand
dollars, say twenty--as an advance," said...

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...faith as Harry in Stone's Landing, when the latter
opened the project to him, but Harry...

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...he would pay the
bill himself. Whereupon Harry dismissed the matter then and thereafter
from his...

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...of
novelty. Col. Sellers was at the landing to bid thorn good-bye.

"I shall send you...

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...at any moment, the gables and square windows of an
Elizabethan mansion in one of the...

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...at his
table over his field-book, and then arose, stepped outside the tent door
and sang, in...

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...without, however,
the least idea of engineering practical or theoretical. Perhaps there
was not a great...

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...dashed," was heard the cheery voice of Mr. Thompson, as he
stepped outside the tent door...

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...there in the
flooring made the crossing of the bridge faster than a walk an offense
not...

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...camp over the prairie. As it drew near, the wagon was seen to
contain a...

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...dozen of that Burgundy, I was telling you
of Mr. Briefly. By the way, you...

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...that railroad
any mo'."

Harry went with the Colonel to Hawkeye to complete their arrangements, a
part of...

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...beauty, and
that more fatal gift which does not always accompany mere beauty, the
power of fascination,...

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...but the federal colonel released him, after a short
examination, satisfied that he could most injure...

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...of the
gossips of Murpheysburg and have out lived the bitterness that was
growing in her heart,...

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...was unaccustomed. She had read of such men, but she had never seen
one before,...

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...happened on that very
day or the next that alarmed her. Washington did not know...

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...came to herself the Colonel was gone. Washington Hawkins stood
at her bedside. Did...