The Gilded Age, Part 1.

By Mark Twain

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...THE GILDED AGE

A Tale of Today

by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

1873


Part 1.


PREFACE.

This book was...

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...that does not bear the
marks of the two writers of the book. S....

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...like this did not fill up the postmaster's whole
month, though, and therefore he "kept store"...

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...Damrell said:

"Tha hain't no news 'bout the jedge, hit ain't likely?"

"Cain't tell for sartin; some...

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...Well, well, well, everything is so uncertain."

At last he said:

"I believe I'll do it.--A man...

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...might drop something that would tell even these
animals here how to discern the gold mine...

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...bank of the branch?--well,
that's it. You've taken it for rocks; so has every body...

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... Far from
it. I have a letter from Beriah Sellers--just came this day. ...

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...for, and everything going along just right, he couldn't get
the laws passed and down the...

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...patience with such tedious people.
Now listen, Nancy--just listen at this:

"'Come...

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...that the trouble
was in the, house, and made room for Hawkins to pass. Then...

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...talk about it."

Clay had disappeared from the door; but he came in, now, and the
neighbors...

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...will shine brighter
at the judgment day than the rights that many' a man has done...

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...the vague riband of trees on the further shore, the verge of a
continent which surely...

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...glare reached farther and wider, the negro's
voice lifted up its supplications:

"O Lord', we's ben mighty...

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... Dat's it!"

"Uncle Dan'l, do you reckon it was the prayer that saved us?" said...

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...nigger gwyne to do what he kin to sabe
you agin"

He did go to the woods...

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...but "smelt"
the bar, and straightway the foamy streak that streamed away from her
bows vanished, a...

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...and down the deck; climbed about the bell; made friends
with the passenger-dogs chained under the...

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...only said:

"Damnation!"

George Davis, the pilot on watch, shouted to the night-watchman on deck:

"How's she loaded?"

"Two...

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...and forth with anxious watchfulness
while the steamer tore along. The chute seemed to come...

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...is. We won't take any tricks off
of him, old man!"

"I wish I'd a stopped...

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...the unhurt--at least all that could be
got at, for the whole forward half of the...

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...form a dreadful and unhuman
aspect.

A little wee French midshipman of fourteen lay fearfully injured, but
never...

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...five years, frightened and crying bitterly, was struggling
through the throng in the Boreas' saloon calling...

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...husband and wife met again, the
question was asked and answered.

When the Boreas had journeyed some...

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...have a machine like that one you and Colonel Sellers bought; and
sometimes I think I'll...

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...a fight, and so they commanded the peace and the foreign dog coiled
his tail and...

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...but just make yourselves
perfectly at home and comfortable, and spread yourselves out and rest!
You hear...

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...read without stopping to spell
the words or take breath. Hawkins bought out the village...

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...the ablest critics in the place. Perhaps
it is only fair to explain that we...

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...which
had thrown their lives together.

And yet any one who had known the secret of Laura's...

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...now he was down again, and deeper in the mire than ever. He paced
the...

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...in a moment. Within a minute she was
back again with a business-looking stranger, whom...

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...business man's a deep fox--always a deep fox;
this man's that iron company himself--that's what he...

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...providence from the very bottom of my heart of hearts!
What sort of ruin do you...

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...There are many mouths to
feed; Clay is at work; we must lose you, also, for...

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...child?"

"Why I think she would send it, if you would write her--and I know she
would...

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...a horse and cart; and now that the good-byes were ended he
bundled Washington's baggage in...

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...to make an attempt now.

The girls would not have been permitted to work for a...

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...pirate is only a seedy, unfantastic "rough," when he is out of the
pictures.

Toward evening, the...

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...shelter the
son of the best man that walks on the ground. Si Hawkins has...

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...the stove and make
yourself at home--just consider yourself under your own shingles my boy
--I'll have...

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... As I was saying to ---- silence in the
court, now, she's begun to strike!...

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...lots of funerals--won't he, Sis! Did you ever see a
house afire? I have!...

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...of this family. Don't you fail to write your father about
it, Washington. And...

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...hurry
what should be a lingering luxury in order to be fully appreciated--it
was from the private...

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...exactly promised
yet--there's no hurry--the more indifferent I seem, you know, the more
anxious those fellows will...

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...do, but--now just listen a moment--just let me give you an
idea of what we old...

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...before many weeks I wager the country will ring with the
fame of Beriah Sellers' Infallible...

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...noses are--and sin. It's
born with them, it stays with them, it's all that some...

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...world
would open its eyes when it found out. And he closed his letter thus:

"So...

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...world be light and he would
get forty dollars a month and be boarded and lodged...

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...upon him; how her voice thrilled him when she first spoke; how
charmed the very air...

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...and even the General unbent and said encouraging
things to him.--There was balm in this; but...

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...her rebuke when he tried to explain, that
taught him that to let her sleep when...

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...him and was evidently trying to speak. Instantly
Laura lifted his head and in a...

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...threw
themselves into each others' arms and gave way to a frenzy of grief....