The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today

By Mark Twain

Page 0

...THE GILDED AGE

A Tale of Today

By

Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

1873



Part 1.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I. Squire Hawkins...

Page 1

...such a way that a man might stand in the midst of the
city and not...

Page 2

...jungle of hair under the chin and
hiding the throat--the only pattern recognized there as being...

Page 3

...marvel was discussed at considerable length; and almost with
animation. But presently there was a dog-fight...

Page 4

...tell your Nancy----"

"For goodness sake, Si----"

"Wait, Nancy, wait--let me finish--I've been secretly bailing and fuming
with...

Page 5

...they burn? Coal!" [He bent over
and whispered again:] "There's world--worlds of it on this land!...

Page 6

...we'll not starve, Nancy. Far from
it. I have a letter from Beriah Sellers--just came this...

Page 7

...thing tumbled. And there in Kentucky,
when he raked up that old numskull that had been...

Page 8

...along, or you might be
too late. Throw away your traps, if necessary, and come empty-handed.
You'll...

Page 9

...with a careworn, gentle
face that had more the look of sleep about it than of...

Page 10

...him. They was from away north somers--she
kep' school when she fust come. Goodness knows what's...

Page 11

...him in his bed in the
neighboring farm house, and coaxed him to talk about his...

Page 12

...were in keeping with the character; and so awed
were they by the grandeur and the...

Page 13

...like yo' long-sufferin' lovin' kindness
for to take dis kind o' 'vantage o' sick little chil'en...

Page 14

...an' he wouldn't scasely fine
it out. Date's de Hebrew chil'en dat went frough de fiah;...

Page 15

...fright, every time the
gauge-cocks sent out an angry hiss, and they quaked from head to...

Page 16

...the bow and hove the lead, while the boat
slowed down and moved cautiously; sometimes she...

Page 17

...can't be the Blue Wing. She couldn't pick us up this way. It's the
Amaranth, sure!"

He...

Page 18

...said Jim, under his breath.

"Let her come!"

The boat sprang away from the bank like a...

Page 19

...snowy pillars of steam aloft, the
boat ground and surged and trembled--and slid over into----

"M-a-r-k twain!"

"Quarter-her----"

"Tap!...

Page 20

...weight careened the vessels over toward each
other--officers flew hither and thither cursing and storming, trying
to...

Page 21

...from time to time, and glared more fiercely
and sent its luminous tongues higher and higher...

Page 22

...of inquest was impaneled, and after due deliberation and inquiry
they returned the inevitable American verdict...

Page 23

...asserted itself with more and more pertinacity as
the hours wore on--but both hesitated to give...

Page 24

...about the children, Nancy--never in the world. They're all right.
Nancy, there's oceans and oceans of...

Page 25

...the wayfarers with lazy curiosity. All these people presently managed
to drag themselves to the vicinity...

Page 26

...any strangers here, I can tell you. Bless your souls
we'll make you think you never...

Page 27

...tender young humanity devoted itself for eight or ten hours a day
to learning incomprehensible rubbish...

Page 28

...semi-weekly St. Louis
journal--almost the only papers that came to the village, though Godey's
Lady's Book found...

Page 29

...were both too young at the time
of the fearful accident on the Mississippi to know...

Page 30

...apparel, he felt like a traitor and refused to
sign.

But now he was down again, and...

Page 31

...again with a business-looking stranger, whom she seated, and then
she took her leave again. Hawkins...

Page 32

...see that; he don't want the
company to go into this thing--O, that's very good; yes,...

Page 33

...upon millions in
it! But fool as I am I told him he could have half...

Page 34

...has often wanted me to come,
ever since he moved to Hawkeye."

"I'm afraid he can't well...

Page 35

...will find a way to get there. I
will make a way. And I will find...

Page 36

...misfortune seemed to have left hope and
ambition dead within him; he had no projects, formed...

Page 37

...her out of cobwebs,
Dust, but I'll have her! raise wool...

Page 38

...see them, but I'm into so many operations, and they're not things a
man feels like...

Page 39

...of a negro trader and depart for the remote South to be seen no
more by...

Page 40

...old hair-cloth sofa against the wall; a few damaged chairs;
the small table the lamp stood...

Page 41

...general Babel of information
about deceased--nobody offering to read the riot act or seeming to
discountenance the...

Page 42

...with excitable temperaments, especially where there is any
tendency toward rheumatic affections. Bless you I saw...

Page 43

...Washington was told to drink it slowly
and not hurry what should be a lingering luxury...

Page 44

...I seem, you know, the
more anxious those fellows will get. And then there is the...

Page 45

...Rothschild's proposition--this is between you and me, you
understand----"

Washington nodded three or four times impatiently, and...

Page 46

...and seven
cents for the two sizes.

"The first year sell, say, ten thousand bottles in Missouri,...

Page 47

...Delhi,
Bombay--and Calcutta! Annual income--well, God only knows how many
millions and millions apiece!"

Washington was so dazed,...

Page 48

...can spend. Break it to father cautiously--you
understand the need of that--break it to him cautiously,...

Page 49

...out another one on a long table. The office
was in the principal street. The General...

Page 50

...and they warned Louise, without
stating particulars or making allusions to any special person, that a
girl...

Page 51

...the way home he nursed his woe and exalted it. He pictured
himself as she must...

Page 52

...father--he did not call me. I would not have treated
him so. How could you do...

Page 53

...and his last
sentences were spoken with scarcely a perceptible halt or hindrance.
With an effort he...

Page 54

...49.  RUTH
LOOKING AT THE "NEW ONE" BY CANDLE LIGHT 60.  "ONLY FOR YOU, BRIERLY"
51.  AN ACCLIMATED MAN 51.  NO...

Page 55

...She was astonished, and at first incredulous. She was about
to ask her mother if there...

Page 56

...to talk the French patois of his
boyhood in the delirium of typhus fever, though he...

Page 57

...in his walk--it was not stated which leg was defective. And
this indistinct shadow represented her...

Page 58

...Hawkins, the elder children, Col. Sellers and herself had kept
so long and so faithfully; and...

Page 59

...Villagers always want to know.

The family fought shy of the questionings, and of course that...

Page 60

...when we are settled there."

But Maria could not stay. She had come to mingle romantic...

Page 61

...you can--the oftener the better. You can't
please us any better than that, Washington; the little...

Page 62

...I would'nt take
three fortunes for one little operation I've got on hand now--have
anything from the...

Page 63

...me, does the doctor. He's a man that
keeps himself to himself, and well he may,...

Page 64

...and enthusiastic
listener, but he was not, for two matters disturbed his mind and
distracted his attention....

Page 65

...place and time in the world where and when it seems easy
to "go into something"...

Page 66

...the right
entrance, in wait to steal the pretty wife of his rich and tyrannical
neighbor from...

Page 67

...hazel eyes set wide apart,
a broad but not high forehead, and a fresh winning face....

Page 68

...newspaper managers didn't
want genius, but mere plodding and grubbing. Philip therefore read
diligently in the Astor...

Page 69

...the honor of lodging and partially
feeding several other young fellows of like kidney, who have...

Page 70

...he, I've done my duty by letting them know. Happy
youth, that is ready to pack...

Page 71

...which our travelers found themselves members, was Duff
Brown, the great railroad contractor, and subsequently a...

Page 72

...a one, two, three step, shaven, curled and
perfumed after his usual exquisite fashion.

"What's jolly?" asked...

Page 73

...an excitement that accorded with their own hopeful
anticipations.

The party went to the Southern Hotel, where...

Page 74

...when he had finished, he had the
most cheerful confidence that he had done a good...

Page 75

...Philip, to whom a salary of two thousand
would have seemed wealth, before he started on...

Page 76

...friendly manner, and with a frank
open-heartedness that inspired confidence.

"Yes, born East myself, raised all along,...

Page 77

...his
fingers into his right vest pocket. That movement being without result,
with a shade of disappointment...

Page 78

...Chelton Hills, or
of that world which his entrance, into her tradition-bound life had been
one of...

Page 79

...ways of thy ancestors, what then?"

Ruth turned square round to her mother, and with an...

Page 80

...for the opera in more worldly
circles.

"Is thee going to the Yearly Meeting, Ruth?" asked one...

Page 81

...and at length she exclaimed, with a sort of impatience,

"I wish I could go west,...

Page 82

...him peculiar and characteristic, different from that of any
other woman.

Ruth was glad to hear that...

Page 83

...for a time," suggested Eli; "there is
a fair beginning of a Woman's Medical College in...

Page 84

...of the road. All we want," continued Mr. Bigler
in his frank manner, "is a few...

Page 85

...and politics, and thoroughly
entertained himself all dinner time, and as much disgusted Ruth, who
asked no...

Page 86

...the children wished that Ruth would
never go away again. But her mother noticed, with a...

Page 87

...which had not much more savor of death in it than
the analysis of a portion...

Page 88

...and at some distance across the roofs of lower buildings, the
girls saw a tall edifice,...

Page 89

...been under.

CHAPTER XVI.

While Ruth was thus absorbed in her new occupation, and the spring was
wearing...

Page 90

...engineer corps of
the Salt Lick Pacific Extension, but that wasn't his real business.

"I'm to have,...

Page 91

...Jeff says that a railroad is
for--the accommodation of the people and not for the benefit...

Page 92

...to the landlord that he was not that day in
funds, but he would draw on...

Page 93

...Senator, that you have become acclimated to this country?"

"Well," said the Vice-President, crossing his legs,...

Page 94

...and his long and shining boots attracted not
a little the attention of the few persons...

Page 95

...which he
declared necessary on account of the chill of the evening.

"I never saw an Eastern...

Page 96

...it? They must a cost right smart," referring to the
boots.

Harry shouldered his rod and went...

Page 97

...less than a week, this indomitable engineer had
carried his moving caravan over slues and branches,...

Page 98

...wooden bridge, the supports
of which leaned all ways in the soggy soil; the absence of...

Page 99

...o'clock a horse and wagon was descried making a slow approach
to the camp over the...

Page 100

...to dine with me."
And the Colonel strode away to the wagon and looked under the...

Page 101

...the navigation of Columbus River.

CHAPTER XVIII.

Eight years have passed since the death of Mr. Hawkins....

Page 102

...was left to
be very much her own guide at the age when romance comes to...

Page 103

...He was captain of the home
guards in Hawkeye, and he never left home except upon...

Page 104

...was
congenial to her, and her mind preyed upon itself; and the mystery of
her birth at...

Page 105

...as
pure and deep as her own. She worshipped him and would have counted her
life a...

Page 106

...imagined, was neither regular nor
frequent between the remote confederate camp at Harding and Hawkeye,
and Laura...

Page 107

...could
conquer death almost. And with her health came back her beauty, and an
added fascination, a...

Page 108

...go unappreciated in such a place. A land
operator, engaged in vast speculations, a favorite in...

Page 109

...a glowing
description of Napoleon and the adjacent country, and a statement of the
absolute necessity to...

Page 110

...was piqued as well. A country girl, poor
enough, that was evident; living with her family...

Page 111

...did not
by any means share all the delusion of the family; but her brain was
not...

Page 112

...business there; say, about this
Columbus River appropriation?"

"Sellers!" and Laura laughed.

"You needn't laugh. Queerer things have...

Page 113

...men were well enough without, but as
for him he never neglected the ordinances of religion....

Page 114

...had not at the moment had a little square
letter in his breast pocket, dated at...

Page 115

...how to live by only working for themselves. Idle,
sir, there's my garden just a ruin...

Page 116

...sight,"
shouted a tipsy fellow near the door. Cries of "put him out."]

"My friends, do not...

Page 117

...You see by
the map. Columbus River. This country must have water communication!"

"You'll want a considerable...

Page 118

...the region. It was not a very promising state, and the good man
felt how much...

Page 119

...when he at length went away from Hawkeye he
was no nearer it. But there was...

Page 120

...had the instinct to
know that this was not the extrication she dreamed of, and that...

Page 121

...Delft Haven by the illness of a
child. They came over to Massachusetts Bay in another...

Page 122

...taken as denoting a languidness in the family concerning
foreign missions, but perhaps unjustly.

At any rate...

Page 123

...no end of
nonsense in him and was always blundering into something, but he was a
royal...

Page 124

...no one
would have deemed possible for her. Parties, picnics, rowing-matches,
moonlight strolls, nutting expeditions in the...

Page 125

...a free and lordly way
about them that almost awed the hotel clerk himself. Indeed, he...

Page 126

...a company for that
purpose. An appropriation was a tangible thing, if you could get hold...

Page 127

...it exceedingly difficult to put into words, the door opened
quietly, and Ruth entered. Taking in...

Page 128

...he hadn't an ear to know whether
it was sung correctly. All the same he doted...

Page 129

...seem as necessary to you
to do it as it did before you came to Fallkill?"

It...

Page 130

...only
last Saturday, that I might as well go down to Arizona and hunt for
diamonds? A...

Page 131

...to spend in Fallkill, they were at the
Montagues, and Philip hoped that he would find...

Page 132

...should go on myself," wrote the Colonel, "but I am engaged in the
invention of a...

Page 133

...and
after that the Senator did not press the subject.

Philip, if the truth must be told,...

Page 134

...manners, the faces and
the fashions there, presented a variety that was infinite. Washington
had never been...

Page 135

...it was foggy. When you finished
your breakfast at ten o'clock and went out, the sunshine...

Page 136

...is the matter with him; but
everybody feels for him. Well, you ought not to go...

Page 137

...taste reduced to mathematical completeness is what the
inside offers to the eye, if it remains...

Page 138

...of the public buildings and the darkey boy
who purifies the Department spittoons--represents Political Influence.
Unless you...

Page 139

...trim colored servants, dainty
food--everything a body could wish for. And as for stationery, there
was no...

Page 140

...skin
of its teeth, on third reading and final passage. Then came letters
telling of Mr. Dilworthy's...

Page 141

...or not thin it's a fact,
anyway, they say, 'Come, now, but do you really believe...

Page 142

...at the very lowest
calculation, and then your father will give his consent and we can...

Page 143

...by this time.
Sellers threw a lot or two on the market, "as a feeler," and...

Page 144

...end of some weeks Harry's orders were a drug in the
market--nobody would take them at...

Page 145

...admiration, and
that was the reason she was unwilling to wear plain clothes and attend
Meeting. The...

Page 146

...delighted with this change in her, with
the improvement in her health and the interest she...

Page 147

...a bit of a fop maybe."

"And thee preferred the fop to the serious-minded?"

"I didn't prefer...

Page 148

...surveying and examining the land. We want to
know what it is. And if there is...

Page 149

...of their society, without buttons, before or behind,
but with a row of hooks and eyes...

Page 150

...and the rest of the children?"

"Ah, father, thee sees every thing in a rose-colored light....

Page 151

...is not the golden age of mutual trust, of unlimited reliance upon
human promises? That is...

Page 152

...little--don't anything suggest itself?
Bless your heart, you dear women live right in the present all...

Page 153

...you can see how
much better Napoleon is located than Hawkeye. Now here you are with...

Page 154

...town's as bound to die as--well if I owned it I'd
get its obituary ready, now,...

Page 155

...after all, Beriah. I'm sorry I was blue, but it
did seem as if everything had...

Page 156

...annoyance had time to augment a
good deal; for he was allowed to cool his heels...

Page 157

...you two officers amounts altogether
to $2,400--about one-eighth of your ten per cent. assessment, you see;
which...

Page 158

...appropriation like that.
It was never intended for anything but a mere nest egg for the...

Page 159

...because they'll 'lead' your
article and put it right in the midst of the reading matter;...

Page 160

...because we are all
liable to be mistaken. But how would it strike you if I...

Page 161

...in
Washington," said the president, gathering up the letters; "of course
you must have had. Very few...

Page 162

...you go? Well, good
morning. Look in, when you are passing; and whenever I can give...

Page 163

...away, as the summer waned and fall
approached. Town lots were no longer salable, traffic ceased,...

Page 164

...marched up to him, and burst out
with,

"You are a brute, an infernal brute, to treat...

Page 165

...that the company have put a new engine on the seven o'clock train,
and newly upholstered...

Page 166

...in getting into a
fight with such an autocrat.

At the little station where Philip waited for...

Page 167

...and a store, and three or four unpainted dwellings of
the slab variety.

As Philip approached the...

Page 168

...rawness. P. Dusenheimer, standing in the door of his uninviting
groggery, when the trains stopped for...

Page 169

...and making superficial observations
as to the prospect of coal.

The landlord at Ilium endeavored to persuade...

Page 170

...what I am. I want money, too; and if one
may judge by what she hears,...

Page 171

...do what he can, of course; and Harry's a good fellow and
always does the very...

Page 172

...mitigate his stubborne malady.

Spenser's Faerie Queens.

Mr. Henry Brierly was exceedingly...

Page 173

...her manner continued
entirely unrestrained. She neither sought his company nor avoided it,
and this perfectly level...

Page 174

...love and
marriage, meaning Ruth, as if sisters could by no possibility have any
personal concern in...

Page 175

...and Alice and Philip, "world's people," went to a
church in town, and he sat through...

Page 176

...by any disparaging communications about Harry, both because he
could not help liking the fellow himself,...

Page 177

...grave studies.

Had Ruth a premonition of Philip's intention, in his manner? It may be,
for when...

Page 178

...if to run a race over the
mass to the entrance.

Philip who had forced the girls...

Page 179

...now, so
extraordinary was the improvement wrought by rich fashionable attire.

"But your criticisms are too full...

Page 180

...prop them on his desk and enjoy them
himself with a selfish disregard of other people's...

Page 181

...happiness! Tell me, my dear Miss Hawkins--"

"Sh! I know what you are going to ask....

Page 182

...hour
ago he had thought to take this country lass under his protection and
show her "life"...

Page 183

...ago and thrown his
fascinations about Laura with permanent effect while she was new and
strange to...

Page 184

...grade favor her in turn with an initial call, giving
their cards to the servant at...

Page 185

...all she received
from that limb of the aristocracy afterward. This call was paid by Mrs.
Major-General...

Page 186

...novel and interesting that my days are made up more of
sunshine than shadow."

"Washington is not...

Page 187

...on the
harness were highly polished and bore complicated monograms. There were
showy coats of arms, too,...

Page 188

...he
was wealthy when he first came from Cork, but just the reverse. When
he first landed...

Page 189

...Wm. M. Weed himself, who had stolen
$20,600,000 from the city and was a man so...

Page 190

...They landed here as the Hon. Patrique Oreille and
family, and so are known unto this...

Page 191

...was in a potato.

He asked what it was! Now you know that when Providence shapes...

Page 192

...and
it looks as if it was chronic. And you know I do dread dyspepsia. We've
all...

Page 193

...too!"

Everybody--"Goodness!"

Mrs. O.--"Yes. So he set his leg and bandaged it up, and fixed his ribs
and...

Page 194

...performed very satisfactorily, with his "right hand hind leg" in the
air. All were affected--even Laura--but...

Page 195

...both the executive and legislative branches of the
government, and whose characters had been for years...

Page 196

...to devote every unoccupied moment to this sort of preparation.
Having now acquired a happy smattering...

Page 197

...was growing used to celebrity,
and could already sit calm and seemingly unconscious, under the fire...

Page 198

...the dust. In time it came to be said that her way was paved
with broken...

Page 199

...and in time he began to
feel that he was being deliberately persecuted in this way;...

Page 200

...of hard wood?"

Laura laughed a good old-fashioned laugh that had more of her former
natural self...

Page 201

...of the side
arrangements, some of the--"

"You didn't mention me?"

"Oh, no. I told him you were...

Page 202

...us, I suppose? Balloon is a whole-hearted fellow. I can't
help loving that man, for all...

Page 203

...or a brother-in-law. . . . And everybody has 'em. .
. .Let's see: . ....

Page 204

...and shipped that ton of second-hand
rubbish, old boots and pantaloons and what not through the...

Page 205

...Few lands are so blest."

"That is true, Colonel. To be sure you can buy now...

Page 206

...We are expecting it every day. It isn't
out yet."

"I think you must be mistaken, because...

Page 207

...the most splendid book I ever read. I know you will
like these books, ma'm, because...

Page 208

...selection of food for
the mind--except of course wrapping paper, or twine, or wafers, or
something like...

Page 209

...what
were they compared to the ravishing smile with which she flooded his
whole system? When she...

Page 210

...the case it could not affect you, Miss Hawkins," said
the chairman gallantly. "Fame does not...

Page 211

...I
had been inclined to forget, I--did you not give me something by way of
a remembrancer?"

"Did...

Page 212

...alone and communed with herself;

"He is fairly hooked, poor thing. I can play him at...

Page 213

...been here a week, Grace, and don't know? He's the
catch of the season. That's Washington...

Page 214

...pass, turned to look at them. Washington began to feel that the eyes
of the public...

Page 215

...Washington. "And Santo Domingo. Senator
Dilworthy says, we are bound to extend our religion over the...

Page 216

...in rage by turns, tossed in a tumult of
passion, which she gave way to with...

Page 217

...slang. There might be burglars about.

Laura said that very likely it was only her nervousness....

Page 218

...get pay for some cotton that was
destroyed during the war. There were many others in...

Page 219

...He felt now that he must temporize, that he
must gain time. There was danger in...

Page 220

...thrilled through
Laura. He was looking into her eyes as he had looked in those old...

Page 221

...is snatched out of the black shadow of falsehood, and
is at the moment recognized as...

Page 222

... King Henry IV.

As may be readily believed, Col. Beriah Sellers was by this...

Page 223

...let things
flow in and out. He'd be mistaken. What I look to is quality, sir....

Page 224

...remarkable information with which they every morning
surprised the country, revealing the most secret intentions of...

Page 225

...going to throw it away, not the whole of
it."

Harry told the Colonel that they must...

Page 226

...it did not know. She
would see him, whatever excuses he made, and however he avoided...

Page 227

...puzzled him not a little that all his fascinations seemed to go for
so little with...

Page 228

...anything against you, Laura, but Col. Selby does not
mean you any good. I know you...

Page 229

...in fact madly in love with
this woman.

It is not for us to analyze the passion...

Page 230

...Then came stories about Laura, town talk, gossip which Harry
denied the truth of indignantly; but...

Page 231

...getting strong with even disagreeable rapidity.

During his first weeks of pain and weakness, Ruth was...

Page 232

...it. She had upon his mind that peaceful influence that Mrs.
Bolton had when, occasionally, she...

Page 233

...the Hon. Mr. Trollop was a bitter enemy of
her bill. He urged her not to...

Page 234

...Mr. Trollop to make his great speech on the Pension bill."

"Do you? But you remember...

Page 235

...I laid a little plan for his benefit two weeks ago. I think he will
be...

Page 236

...cannot come to an understanding, Miss
Hawkins."

"No, I am afraid not--if you have resumed your principles,...

Page 237

...am not distressed about the National Improvement Relief Measure."

"Oh indeed I am not trying to...

Page 238

...speech. Here it is!"--and she displayed a
sheet of manuscript.

Mr. Trollop turned immediately back from the...

Page 239

...pains, for a
body to hire another body to construct a great speech for him and...

Page 240

...early opportunity to ask Mr. Buckstone if he knew
of anybody who might want a speech...

Page 241

...jest to harp on it after one has had one's laugh. I would much
rather talk...

Page 242

...a relative of each as a member of the University incorporation. They
will handle a million...

Page 243

...doing anything. I went
there hoping she would try to bribe me--good solid capital that would...

Page 244

...However, I don't know--I
don't know. I will think a moment. Suppose he voted no; suppose...

Page 245

...that looked to the
spread of religion and temperance.

His paper supported the new bill with gushing...

Page 246

...is right, let us go into raptures,
for nobody can ask a heartier persecution than these...

Page 247

...correspondents were
sending such telegrams as these abroad in the land; Under date of--

SATURDAY. "Congressmen Jex...

Page 248

...of the object
of his passion. Quiet resignation under relinquishment of any thing
he wanted was not...

Page 249

...as it would affect some
relative, acquaintance or friend.

Love, travel, even death itself, waited on the...

Page 250

...only reached in magnitude
some of his lesser fancies, the by-play of his constructive imagination.

"The country...

Page 251

...signs of a change in manner towards
her, a little less respect perhaps from men, and...

Page 252

...who have so much admiration, how
sincere and overmastering his love is for you?" Philip would...

Page 253

...it meekly, and made up his own mind that Philip
didn't know much about women.

CHAPTER XLV.

The...

Page 254

...House had
voted upon the acceptance or rejection of the report upon all but it,
and the...

Page 255

...ignorant? We
had cast them upon their own resources. Should we leave them without
tools? We could...

Page 256

...party, for they had no
personal stake in the bill.

Sunset came, and still the fight went...

Page 257

...they went to meet him.
After a brief comparison of notes, the Congressmen sought their seats
and...

Page 258

...House; the people seemed to hold their breath.

The voting ceased, and then there was an...

Page 259

...when the House sits as a House, is greatly diminished when it sits
as Committee. The...

Page 260

...disgorged their burden, and presently the
house was silent and deserted.

When Col. Sellers and Washington stepped...

Page 261

...done with poverty, sad toil,
weariness and heart-break; all the world is filled with sunshine."



Part 6.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER...

Page 262

...the
projects of each other, and to extend a mutual aid which in a more
vulgar body...

Page 263

...not seen since yesterday afternoon, when
he left him to go to the House.

Harry was not...

Page 264

...marshes; then
long rock cuttings devoted to the advertisements of patent medicines and
ready-made, clothing, and New...

Page 265

...as to
what occurred. They had happened to be looking towards the door when the
man--Col. Selby--entered...

Page 266

...the persons present in the parlor says that after Laura
Hawkins had fired twice, she turned...

Page 267

...the premonitory
drops to this mighty shower. The scene was dramatically worked up in
column after column....

Page 268

...discussed, the dozen different theories of the motive,
broached in the newspapers, were disputed over.

During the...

Page 269

...as soon as he was out of Centre Street, and he
insisted on giving Philip and...

Page 270

...of that sort. You never did anything of the sort
before."

Laura smiled very faintly and said,

"Yes,...

Page 271

...of the favors of the one,
may have been as incorruptible as the Republican statesmen who...

Page 272

...the law; and
there was a fervent hope that the law would take its plain course.

Yet...

Page 273

...her simplicity
and faith, also got into the newspapers in time, and probably added to
the pathos...

Page 274

...in connection with the election?

"Not that I knew," said Bigler, shaking his head in disgust....

Page 275

...he
didn't know where to look for the necessaries of life for his family. If
he could...

Page 276

...in a
remote Massachusetts village, Philadelphia was a city of many splendors.
All its inhabitants seemed highly...

Page 277

...night, if you had any practice; and what sort of a home would that
make for...

Page 278

...bole in the ground, if you have
money enough to pay for the digging, but those...

Page 279

...a trial unprepared. There were many reasons for a
delay, reasons which of course are never...

Page 280

...Mohawk."

"I'm free to say that I believe it, and the men all think so too....

Page 281

...to
the wild tract which Philip was experimenting on, and which had, no
marketable value above the...

Page 282

...with the afternoon mail from the office. Mr. Bolton
took his letters listlessly, dreading to open...

Page 283

...writing
about. And now he must contradict it. "It turns out to be only a mere
seam,"...

Page 284

...Bigler swindle was disclosed there was no more hope that
Mr. Bolton could extricate himself, and...

Page 285

...more
importance than their own misfortune. And there was that in Ruth's
manner--in what she gave him...

Page 286

...little word "no" to Mr. Bigler, Alice Montague
might now be spending the winter in Philadelphia,...

Page 287

...us own, that he was in this
position. There are many young men like him in...

Page 288

...bear it alone, she was only doing what thousands of women do, with a
self-renunciation and...

Page 289

...young ladies are contemplating a change of
sex."

"No, only a changed sex," retorted Alice; "we contemplate...

Page 290

...till I make money enough to try again."

Philip took from his pocket a map of...

Page 291

...manly
face and the sound of his cheery voice.

Ruth's course was vindicated now, and it certainly...

Page 292

...trial begins
tomorrow."

CHAPTER LI.

December 18--, found Washington Hawkins and Col. Sellers once more at
the capitol of...

Page 293

...to work--that is what that is. And it
pinches when a body's got a bill waiting."

"A...

Page 294

...as long on a stretch. I think there is something
great in being a model for...

Page 295

...their body; and
without waiting ten days, hardly, to think the thing over, they rose up
and...

Page 296

...been as good fish in the sea
as there are now. It shall never be said...

Page 297

...ever knew, Colonel
Sellers! and if the people only knew you as I do, you would...

Page 298

...moment one could find the youth with the Senator even oftener
than with Col. Sellers. When...

Page 299

...taking. The University bill was safe, now; he could leave
it without fear; it needed his...

Page 300

...presence, and even took a needle
now and then and made a stitch or two upon...

Page 301

...was thrown. After that they began to come to
themselves by degrees, and presently the spell...

Page 302

...keep their tinsel crowns, I want them not; my
heart is here!

"Again I thought, Is this...

Page 303

...by he was elected to the
legislature--Then he did everything he could for Sunday Schools. He
got...

Page 304

...against Laura Hawkins was finally set
down for trial on the 15th day of February, less...

Page 305

...against
the accused, and recognizes as quickly its favorites among the lawyers.
Nothing delights it more than...

Page 306

...Kings, and he was the first one of
them who had ever come into his kingdom--the...

Page 307

...the indictment, which was in the usual form. It
charged Laura Hawkins, in effect, with the...

Page 308

...he wan't guilty."

The district attorney thought he saw a point.

"Would this feeling rather incline you...

Page 309

...showy contractor. Low foreheads and
heavy faces they all had; some had a look of animal...

Page 310

...about the killing, he narrated the circumstances
substantially as the reader already knows them.

He accompanied Miss...

Page 311

...protested the witness.

"That's all, sir," said Mr. Braham severely.

"One word," said the District Attorney. "Had...

Page 312

...admitted that it
was his. She had asked him for it one morning, saying she thought...

Page 313

...affecting
dramas in all the history of misfortune. I shall have to show you
a life, the...

Page 314

...humble southern home, a beautiful creature, the joy of the
house, the pride of the neighborhood,...

Page 315

...not know what insanity
is."

When Mr. Braham sat down, he felt that he had the jury...

Page 316

...admit the
testimony, as the judge usually does in such cases, after a sufficient
waste of time...

Page 317

...with me, sir, that he went into the
operation of--"

"Yes, yes. Mr. Sellers, did you know...

Page 318

...the letter containing these particulars was lost. Once he heard of
him at a hotel in...

Page 319

...the jury, has this poor suffering orphan flung herself on her knees
with all her heart's...

Page 320

...looked about him loftily, as if casting in his mind
what would be the proper occupation...

Page 321

...moment of
delirium she had turned and defied fate and society. He dwelt upon the
admission of...

Page 322

...hereditary or momentary, as it has
been explained, your verdict will take that into account.

As the...

Page 323

...of turmoil; there were more interests
at stake than it could handle with serenity. He exulted...

Page 324

...the minute our bill
went, through the House, I was Col. Sellers every time. And nobody...

Page 325

...me so himself, afterwards."

The next telegram was from Mr. Dilworthy:

"I have not only brought over...

Page 326

...the spot and read this:

"Tremendous Sensation! Startling news from Saint's Rest! On first ballot
for U....

Page 327

...was of no use. Washington
was past all hope of cheer, now. He only said:

"Oh, it...

Page 328

...your verdict?"

Foreman. "We have."

Judge. "What is it?"

Foreman. "NOT GUILTY."

A shout went up from the entire...

Page 329

...contemplated this. Mr.
Graham said he should move at once for a writ of 'habeas corpus'.

But...

Page 330

...reader will now learn.

Laura left the court room, accompanied by her mother and other friends,
amid...

Page 331

...carry them through. That was his reputation, and it was a
deserved one. He softly said:

"I...

Page 332

...the mine at Ilium, and began transforming the loan he had
received from Squire Montague into...

Page 333

...a wide plain, the one to
journey towards the setting and the other towards the rising...

Page 334

...but not useful. Query. Why
does the Senate still stick to this pompous word, 'Investigation?' One
does...

Page 335

...this conversation, and others like it, continued without let
or hindrance. But our business is with...

Page 336

...said "I will
give you $5,000."

A Committee man said, impatiently, that this stuff was all outside
the...

Page 337

...usual forms. A note would be made of
Mr. Noble's admission.

Mr. Noble continued. He said that...

Page 338

...thousands now,
and a few more by and by; whereupon he gave me two packages of...

Page 339

...soon put a quietus upon the observations of
the representative of the nation, and convinced him...

Page 340

...any blackguard could
insult the Senate of the United States and conspire against the sacred
reputation of...

Page 341

...be guilty, he did not think his
continued presence during the few remaining days of the...

Page 342

...hours filed slowly by her, each laden with some
remnant, some remaining fragment of the dreadful...

Page 343

...she sat thinking, thinking,
while the unheeded moments winged their flight. It was one of those
mornings...

Page 344

...was gone by and could not return; the opportunity
was lost, nothing could restore it. She...

Page 345

...proposed discourse, and marveled how
she would handle it.

Laura's few friends wrote to her or came...

Page 346

...She was bewildered, her strength was
forsaking her. She reeled away from the platform, reached the...

Page 347

...again, and see
all the household about me, as in that old innocent time--and then
die! My...

Page 348

...He shaped his course straight
for Hawkeye, now, and his meeting with his mother and the...

Page 349

...a faint attempt at a smile.

"No indeed; the man is dead that made that trunk...

Page 350

...Why that Tennessee Land--"

"Never mind the Tennessee Land, Colonel. I am done with that, forever
and...

Page 351

...a quiet way, and
its final result, and he said in a whisper, 'You did it,...

Page 352

...and stood there tearing the tax bill to bits and
watching the breeze waft them away,...

Page 353

...this peculiar rock is coal must lie above it or beyond it; this
sign is not...

Page 354

...you. That is what we've come to say."

Philip was touched. If he had had money...

Page 355

...see
that he made any progress.

Late one afternoon he finished drilling a hole which he had...

Page 356

...put
a hand up over his shoulder and felt his back, and a great thrill shot
through...

Page 357

...Und I makes noting. Dat Mister Prierly, he don't never
come back here no more, ain't...

Page 358

...broad farms of corn and wheat, its mean
houses of stone, its vast barns and granaries,...

Page 359

...thin
hand, as Philip touched her forehead with his lips; and he heard her
murmur,

"Dear Phil."

There was...

Page 360

...for thy love."

"Not for thy profession?"

"Oh, thee may be glad enough of that some day,...

Page 361

...been created for her, and love filled
it, till her heart was overflowing with happiness.

It was...