The Entire Project Gutenberg Works of Mark Twain

By Mark Twain

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...THE ENTIRE GUTENBERG TWAIN FILES

...

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... DISGRACEFUL PERSECUTION OF A BOY
THE JUDGES "SPIRITED WOMAN"
...

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...1870
CURIOUS RELIC FOR SALE
A REMINISCENCE...

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...A LITERARY PERSON
AT THE APPETITE-CURE
CONCERNING...

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...BIOGRAPHY
HOW TO TELL A STORY
...

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...REFORM AND COPYRIGHT
COLLEGE GIRLS
GIRLS
...

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... WATTERSON AND TWAIN AS REBELS
ROBERT FULTON FUND
...

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...Difficulties--Five Captains in the
Ship

...

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...Captain's Speech--France in
Sight--The Ignorant Native--In Marseilles--Another Blunder--Lost in
the Great City--Found Again--A Frenchy Scene

...

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...Guide--Church Magnificence--"Women not
Admitted"--How the Genoese Live--Massive Architecture--A Scrap of Ancient
History--Graves for 60,000

...

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...Generosity--Wonderful Mosaics--The Historical
Arno--Lost Again--Found Again, but no Fatted Calf Ready--The Leaning
Tower of Pisa--The Ancient Duomo--The...

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...View at Dawn--Less
Beautiful in the Back Streets--Ascent of Vesuvius Continued--Dwellings a
Hundred Feet High--A Motley Procession--Bill...

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... ...

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... CHAPTER XLIII.
Patriarchal Customs--Magnificent Baalbec--Description of the Ruins
--Scribbling Smiths and...

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...House of
Deborah the Prophetess

...

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...Gethsemane and Other
Sacred Localities

...

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...LX.
Thankless Devotion--A Newspaper Valedictory--Conclusion






...

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...breezy Atlantic and the sunny Mediterranean;
they were to scamper about the decks by day, filling...

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... There is good
reason to believe that this company can...

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... over a beautiful road built by Napoleon I. From this point,
...

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...through the
group of Aeolian Isles, in sight of Stromboli and...

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... reached in three days. At Beirut time will be given to visit
...

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...three days. Captain
Marryatt writes: "I do not know a...

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...the
expense of the ship.

...

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...Bermudians"! People in Europe desiring to join the
excursion--contagious sickness to be avoided--boating at the expense...

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...the Navy, which was to make
"General Sherman and party" welcome guests in the courts and...

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...I would have felt so much relieved.

During that memorable month I basked in the happiness...

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...all this
furniture, there was still room to turn around in, but not to swing a...

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...relief when the gong sounded for prayer meeting.
The first Saturday night of any other pleasure...

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...think a spirit of charity rose up in
their place that was as boundless, for the...

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...is a good pleasure
excursion. I like it. The passengers are not garrulous, but...

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...soon tell you as not--but I
don't like to trust anybody with that instrument. If...

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...strange ships had to be scrutinized through
opera-glasses, and sage decisions arrived at concerning them; and...

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...his chair.

After prayers the Synagogue shortly took the semblance of a writing
school. The like...

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...and what sail we carried, though we don't
ever carry any, principally, going against a head...

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...handsome magic-lantern exhibition.
His views were nearly all of foreign scenes, but there were one or...

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...a ridiculous sentence.

The acting of charades was tried on several evenings by the young
gentlemen and...

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...music going
on, even when it was at its best; and that to exaggerate the crime...

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...good deal worried by the constantly changing "ship time." He was
proud of his new...

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...but a transparent web of jelly that
spreads itself to catch the wind, and has fleshy-looking...

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...and bore away for San Miguel, and Flores shortly became a
dome of mud again and...

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...up the middle of the principal street, and these
vermin surrounded us on all sides and...

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...100 reis, 2,500 reis!' Oh, my sainted mother!

"'Eleven bottles of wine, at 1,200 reis,...

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...and suspend the civil government at his pleasure. The islands
contain a population of about...

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...vines
fifteen years ago, and since that time no wine has been made. The
islands being...

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...some
on one leg and some with one eye out but a gamey look in the...

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...polishing first on one side and
then on the other, but never once took the middle;...

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...the black lava of the walls and
make them beautiful. The trees and vines stretch...

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...it even coated the smokestacks thick with
a white crust of salt to their very tops;...

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...was to bring back that motherland that was in
all their thoughts.

Within the hour we were...

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...navigation and the end of the world. The information the
ancients didn't have was very...

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...to go. I must have a
prodigious quantity of mind; it takes me as much...

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...magnificent; from it vessels seeming like the
tiniest little toy boats were turned into noble ships...

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...be
true--it looks reasonable enough--but as long as those parties can't vote
anymore, the matter can be...

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...opinion on the most abstruse subject and back it up
complacently with quotations from authors who...

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...the compliments of the
Laureate of the Ship, it is not popular with the passengers.

The other...

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...to do but hold the place, and
he was competent to do that, had done it...

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... There is a grace about it
that only comes with long practice." The whole...

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...unsubstantial, freckled all over with
broad yellow splotches, and could neither stand wear nor public
exhibition. ...

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... And the
streets are oriental--some of them three feet wide, some six, but only
two that...

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...of our day amid its hoary relics. Only the
stately phraseology and the measured speech...

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...country, and brained him with his club, which was the
fashion among gentlemen in those days....

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...and said
he had "swamped the bank, had bought eleven quarts of coin, and the head
of...

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...under the guardianship of the stately,
the princely, the magnificent Hadji Muhammad Lamarty (may his tribe
increase!)...

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...city walls and shot. Moorish guns are
not good, and neither are Moorish marksmen. ...

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...Negroes are held in slavery by the Moors. But the moment a
female slave becomes...

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...long enough
for him to swear himself through, and then receives it back before the
ship sails...

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...tables. I thought that hinted at lonesomeness. The idea was
correct. His is...

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...Gibraltar, that hard-featured rock was swimming in a creamy mist so
rich, so soft, so enchantingly...

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...language
that no man could understand, and they endured the exquisite torture a
minute or two and...

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... Steward, bring up another basket of champagne."

It was regarded as a very able effort.

The...

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... Oh, certainly--we don't know the French language."

This was a crusher, as Jack would say....

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...us which way to go to find the Grand Casino."

"Yes, but what did he say?"

"Oh,...

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...and ate fancy
suppers, drank wine, and kept up a chattering din of conversation that
was dazing...

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...change and take snail patties (I prefer
grasshoppers); change and take roast chicken and salad; then...

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...Phoenicians whose
skeletons we have been examining.

In the great Zoological Gardens we found specimens of all...

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...sailboat and a guide and made an excursion to one of the small
islands in the...

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...there.
He never lived to see them.

The walls of these dungeons are as thick as some...

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...at untidiness
--nothing that ever suggests neglect. All is orderly and beautiful--every
thing is charming to...

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...sharp snapping of the whip that never
touched them; to scan the blue distances of a...

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...prefer the American
system. It has not so many grievous "discrepancies."

In France, all is clockwork,...

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...seemed to me, a man came out and held
up a club till the train went...

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...vanity, for their luxuriant
fertility of imagination, for their startling, their brilliant, their
overwhelming mendacity!

By Lyons and...

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...was so tidy, the food
so well cooked, the waiters so polite, and the coming and...

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...saw only wig-making establishments, with
shocks of dead and repulsive hair bound upon the heads of...

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...was sufficient to be skinned--I declined to be
scalped.

I went away from there with my handkerchief...

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...to do, and found them
harmless and unexciting. They might have been exciting, however, if...

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...plain enough that he could not
"speaky" the English quite as "pairfaitemaw" as he had pretended...

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...to a jarring name so easily. I was almost sorry
we had hired this man,...

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...broad
sweep of the heavens that there seemed a chance of our buying anything.
Anyone could have...

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...with pleasurable emotions that I neglect the commonest interests of
the time. However, we will...

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...we saw there were a still more wonderful show.
I discovered that if I were to...

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...was a stirring spectacle.

But the two central figures claimed all my attention. Was ever...

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...schemed and
planned and pondered over future glory and future power; President of
France at last! a...

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...France into his hands and
made it a tolerably free land--for people who will not attempt...

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...are still
preserved in Paris; and that a Christian church took its place about A.D.
300; another...

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...to a priest and told him where to dive for it; he did
dive for it...

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...to the railroad
depot, toward evening, and Ferguson got tickets for a second-class
carriage. Such a...

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...foreigners among a crowd of ten
thousand persons?

But Blondin came out shortly. He appeared on...

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...and took a general view of the can-can. Shouts, laughter,
furious music, a bewildering chaos...

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...the carriage followed
another detachment of bodyguards. Everybody got out of the way;
everybody bowed to...

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...I
touched their dust-covered faces with my finger, but Dagobert was deader
than the sixteen centuries that...

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...mementoes
of it; all Parisian youths and maidens who are disappointed in love come
there to bail...

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...wrote to her; she answered. He wrote again; she
answered again. He was now...

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...teachings of rhetoric and philosophy.

He drove Abelard from his house. Abelard returned secretly and...

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...shall shed some tears on it, and stack up some bouquets and
immortelles, and cart away...

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...in the world of intellectual
excellence, and it came. Urged by kings and princes to...

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...whether they are entitled
to any tearful attentions or not. I wish I had my...

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...it came about. He said he had
attended a great military review in the Champ...

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...graceful--so naive and trusting--so
gentle, so winning--so faithful to their shop duties, so irresistible
to buyers in...

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...giddy, stupefied by the world of
beauty around you, and you half believe you are the...

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...palace and a road to it from Paris. He kept 36,000
men employed daily on...

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...place was useless unless one had a whole year at his
disposal. These pictures are...

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...other filthy dens where
whole suits of second and third-hand clothing are sold at prices that
would...

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...ship, being happy with grog, came down on the
pier and challenged our sailors to a...

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...in Europe, but I doubt it. The population of Genoa is
120,000; two-thirds of these...

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...me too painfully of that San Francisco undertaker who used to
go to sick-beds with his...

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...dispiriting flunkies that I had but little
left to bestow upon palace and pictures.

And besides, as...

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...of interest about the cathedral is the little Chapel of
St. John the Baptist. They...

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...about the style, and
you go up three flights of stairs before you begin to come...

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...not attractive features in a picture.
Some of these painted walls reminded me somewhat of the...

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...shown a miniature silver temple whose fluted
columns, whose Corinthian capitals and rich entablatures, whose spire,
statues,...

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...hillsides were dotted with pretty villas
sitting in the midst of gardens and shrubbery, and whose...

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...morning we went and stood before this marble
colossus. The central one of its five...

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...like the ties of a railroad track, and then the mingling
together of the buds and...

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...and getting thrashed. As I lay
on the lounge and my eyes grew accustomed to...

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...altar of Milan
Cathedral, and receive an impressive sermon from lips that have been
silent and hands...

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...and tin trumpery of the savages of
the plains!

Dead Bartolomeo preached his pregnant sermon, and its...

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...This is the second of St. Luke's Virgins we
have seen. Once a year all...

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...never with waking
eyes!




CHAPTER XIX.

"Do you wis zo haut can be?"

That was what the guide asked...

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...eyebrows? They got fame and sympathy--he
got neither. This is a peculiarly felicitous instance...

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...by some ingenious artist
with little charity in his heart for tired folk. The deception...

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...coach is stabled somewhere
on the plains and its heated machinery allowed to cool for a...

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...and I barely had time to
throw myself against the door--she would have been in, in...

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...of clean shirts, and the peculiarities of the gorilla,
and other curious matters. This reminds...

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...framed the card would have
known enough to submit it to that clergyman before he sent...

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...Vinci (and we see
them every day,) you find artists copying them, and the copies are...

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...away, restore an expression that is gone; patch, and
color, and add, to the dull canvas...

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...(the only young and really beautiful Virgin that
was ever painted by one of the old...

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...girls, coming from
work, hooted at us, shouted at us, made all manner of game of...

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...paid the franc and took
the kiss. She was a philosopher. She said a...

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...habits make it
unnecessary. They carry their preventive with them; they sweat and
fumigate all the...

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...shores, handsome country seats, surrounded by
gardens and groves, sit fairly in the water, sometimes in...

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...is the most voluptuous scene we
have yet looked upon.

Last night the scenery was striking and...

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...jot of the original assertion that in those strangely
magnifying waters one may count the scales...

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...with them, taken part
in the chase with them--for grasshoppers; helped them steal cattle; I
have roamed...

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...There were
towering cliffs on our left, and the pretty Lago di Lecco on our right,
and...

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...of roadside inns, we found huge, coarse
frescoes of suffering martyrs like those in the shrines....

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...the great feudal lords in Europe were pledging
their lands and pawning their plate to fit...

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...yonder castle."

"How now, sirrah!" exclaimed the chief monk, "explain thy ribald speech,
or by'r Lady...

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...friars is all we have."

"Hell and furies! Is the estate going to seed? ...

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...her refuge. "Say, once for all, will
you be mine?--for by my halidome, that breath...

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...magnificent Republic for
nearly fourteen hundred years; whose armies compelled the world's
applause whenever and wherever they...

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...guttersnipe with a portion of his raiment on exhibition which
should have been sacred from public...

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...two miles long--were collected two thousand gondolas, and
every one of them had from two to...

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...use for legs here.

For a day or two the place looked so like an overflowed...

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...portico,
The statues ranged along an...

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...and hoped to see the sun
again. This was in the old days when the...

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...of Venetian
victories in war, and Venetian display in foreign courts, and hallowed
with portraits of the...

Page 159

...show to visitors the implements of torture wherewith the
Three were wont to worm secrets out...

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...from the most ancient pillar
in Venice, in the Grand Square of St. Mark, upon the...

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...battle-ax attachment which
threatens to cut passing boats in two occasionally, but never does. The
gondola...

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...silken tights. His attitude is stately; he is lithe
and supple; all his movements are...

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...his boots!--see
him come sneaking around the corner again, directly, with a crack of the
curtain open...

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...square in the evening. The military bands play in the centre
of it and countless...

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...of a hotel in a certain Italian city:

"John P. Whitcomb,...

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...is neither male nor female,
neither fish, flesh, nor fowl--a poor, miserable, hermaphrodite
Frenchman!

Among a long list...

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...effigies of the great dead of Venice, until we seemed
drifting back, back, back, into the...

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...and painted by his brush--such as Columbus
returning in chains from the discovery of a world,...

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...me for my own sake not to make public the fact
that I lack this appreciation...

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...best but an imperfect rejuvenation of
art. The guide said that after Titian's time and...

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...beyond measure. The barber was rolling
up his apparatus. The temptation was too strong....

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...country by rail without caring to stop. I took few notes.
I find no mention...

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...is proud of it. Florence would foster
this specialty of hers. She is grateful...

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...time, in Florence, to
weep over the tombs of Michael Angelo, Raphael and Machiavelli,
(I suppose they...

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...and I was not certain whether that was
Italian or French. The soldiers looked stupidly...

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...that it ever
stood straight up. It is built of marble. It is an...

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...him of knowing that
he was not a lamp at all; that he was a Pendulum;...

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...a familiar
footstep missed from the threshold, a pleasant voice gone from the
chorus, a vanished form!--a...

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...suspicious, they think.
Something more important must be hidden behind it all. They can not
understand...

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...the same royal stone traversing them
from end to end, and with ample walls and ceilings...

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...away in
its closets, and each with its battalion of priests to be supported.
And then there...

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...brilliant
with polished facings and balustrades of oriental agate, jasper, verde
antique, and other precious stones, whose...

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...their midst the Holy Sepulchre was to have been set up. The
expedition sent to...

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...the vast walls are made wholly
of these precious stones, worked in, and in and in...

Page 185

...son of the Inquisition! He and the leader of the marine
band of a French...

Page 186

...appear to have
any schools here, and only one billiard table. Their education is at...

Page 187

...mine and scattered the good Pope all around, but for
a miraculous providential interference. And...

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...lord of art who laid down his chisel in some old
age that is forgotten, now,...

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...not rare, I aver
that they have a thing which they call a fire-engine, which vomits...

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...hair side out, no hob-nailed shoes, no
prodigious spurs. They wear a conical hat termed...

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...properly governed, and to take hold and help conduct the
government themselves; if they had laws...

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...at Washington--say seven hundred
and thirty feet. I knew it was three hundred and sixty-four...

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...It
was overshadowed by a dome so mighty that its own height was snubbed.
The four great...

Page 194

...could
believe the story, then, that ten thousand troops went to St. Peter's,
once, to hear mass,...

Page 195

...city which stood here before Romulus and Remus
were born or Rome thought of. The...

Page 196

...the
baldacchino. We stood reverently in that place; so did we also in the
Mamertine Prison,...

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...the queens of
fashion and beauty of eighteen centuries ago, and the lizards sun
themselves in the...

Page 198

...the Coliseum" could not move in
the first circles. When the clothing-store merchant wished to...

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... NEW PROPERTIES!...

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... "THE YOUNG ACHILLES,"
will engage four tiger whelps in...

Page 201

... Many
illustrious nobles and generals of the Empire graced the...

Page 202

...hands were clutching at
the railings of the arena. She...

Page 203

...When his ax was describing fiery circles about the heads
of...

Page 204

...of a portion
of his scalp. The General Slaughter was...

Page 205

...the Coliseum, and
the gladiators, the martyrs, and the lions, and yet have never once used
the...

Page 206

...bottom; toiling
all day long by the wrecks of a thousand wagons, the skeletons of ten
thousand...

Page 207

...to get up, the
mule kicked the candle out and smashed most of the kitchen furniture,...

Page 208

...the other day to the guide, "Enough, enough, enough!
Say no more! Lump the whole...

Page 209

...other wonder they show
you. They know it and tell it as a parrot would--and...

Page 210

...party who wrote
this?"

"Christopher Colombo! ze great Christopher Colombo!"

Another deliberate examination.

"Ah--did he write it himself; or--or...

Page 211

...had reserved what he
considered to be his greatest wonder till the last--a royal Egyptian
mummy, the...

Page 212

...end to it. The narrow passages
are roughly hewn in the rock, and on each...

Page 213

...saints. In the catacomb of St. Callixtus, St.
Bridget used to remain long hours in...

Page 214

...and a general procession was formed. It
was to proceed...

Page 215

...there were
quaint architectural structures of various kinds, built of shin bones and
the bones of the...

Page 216

...you. Shortly his father died, and
likewise his mother. The girl returned, rejoicing. ...

Page 217

...the least. I thought he even looked as if he
were thinking, with complacent vanity,...

Page 218

...possible that the reason I find such charms in this
picture is because it is out...

Page 219

...others' lives, a tiger
springing upon a kneeling martyr--these and a thousand other matters
which we read...

Page 220

...Ferguson
said, further, that the Pope permits no ancient work of this kind to
leave his dominions....

Page 221

...twelve or fifteen canonized Popes and martyrs.

Fifth--Jesus Christ the Saviour--(but always as an infant in...

Page 222

...course no one is allowed
to go on board the ship, or come ashore from her....

Page 223

...charge for it; they help you to take off a duster--two cents;
brush your clothes and...

Page 224

...cruelest exhibition--the most wanton, the
most unfeeling. The singer would have conquered an audience of...

Page 225

...this shaving procession as late as four or five years ago. It
was a source...

Page 226

... ...

Page 227

...buildings looked white--and so, rank on rank
of balconies, windows and roofs, they piled themselves up...

Page 228

...honestly believe a good majority of them
are a hundred feet high! And the solid...

Page 229

...mixed procession go by that ever eyes beheld.
Princes (there are more Princes than policemen in...

Page 230

...a half. In Marseilles you pay forty dollars
for a first-class dress coat made by...

Page 231

...Italy. No tint could be more ravishing, no
lustre more superb. Throw a stone...

Page 232

...had been pretty abrupt. For
the next two miles the road was a mixture--sometimes the...

Page 233

...mile in circumference. In the centre
of the great circus ring thus formed, was a...

Page 234

...but for the fact that the
sun could only pierce the mists at long intervals. ...

Page 235

...on the walls of saloon and bed-chamber; and there are
the narrow streets and narrower sidewalks,...

Page 236

...image of Minerva, still keeping
tireless watch and ward over the possessions it was powerless to...

Page 237

...all--at least no remnants of it are left--and
it was curious to see how far (in...

Page 238

...down in one of
the long rows of stone benches in the dress circle, and looked...

Page 239

...and where the tired, heated toilers from the
Campagna used to rest their right hands when...

Page 240

...most poetical thing Pompeii has yielded to modern
research, was that grand figure of a Roman...

Page 241

...himself abroad in a black and moonless night, or in a
...

Page 242

...but the learned Ah-ah Foo-foo states
that he was a cotemporary...

Page 243

...we were traversing. The city of Messina,
milk-white, and starred and spangled all over with...

Page 244

...sunsets here yet like the gorgeous conflagrations that flame
in the track of the sinking sun...

Page 245

...Museum Hill,
and so on. And we got things confused. Discussion became heated, and
party...

Page 246

...than to give a sort of dismal interest to our quarantine-breaking
expedition, and so we dropped...

Page 247

...right direction.
We followed it. It was broad, and smooth, and white--handsome and in
perfect repair,...

Page 248

...into the court within. There was
instantly a banging of doors and a shout. ...

Page 249

...mournful in the moonlight, and startlingly
human! They rose up and confronted the midnight intruder...

Page 250

... On its further side was a
little temple, whose delicate pillars and ornate front glowed...

Page 251

...devout
persons, and in the market daily with them that met...

Page 252

...was obliged to enter a vineyard presently. The
first bunch he seized brought trouble. ...

Page 253

...some of
whom had fallen asleep, no doubt, but were on hand, nevertheless. This
shows what...

Page 254

...adding two or three months' imprisonment to the other novelties
of their Holy Land Pleasure Excursion....

Page 255

...of a ragged population of
ingenious rascals who were out of employment eight months in the...

Page 256

...Government would rebuke some of our
shoddy contractors occasionally, it might work much good. In...

Page 257

...starts ashore till he gets back again, he execrates it. The
boat he goes in...

Page 258

...happily,
comfortably, serenely, among the hurrying feet, are the famed dogs of
Constantinople; drifting noiselessly about are...

Page 259

...very heart and home of cripples and human
monsters, both, go straight to Constantinople. A...

Page 260

...thing.

I do not think much of the Mosque of St. Sophia. I suppose I...

Page 261

...fantastic pagans; overhead the
gaudy mosaics and the web of lamp-ropes--nowhere was there any thing to
win...

Page 262

...or marred by viewless spirits
of the air--by giants, gnomes, and genii--and who still believe, to...

Page 263

...It is the same with silks, antiquities, shawls, etc. The
place is crowded with people...

Page 264

... out--terms private.

"Sales of one lot Circassians, prime to good,...

Page 265

...does not say he is a nice, moral, upright
boy, and goes to Sunday School and...

Page 266

...abject--the most pitiful. In their faces is a
settled expression of melancholy, an air of...

Page 267

...the dogs, the rear
crowding the front, impatient to get on. The dogs looked lazily...

Page 268

...them do them
with my own eyes or heard them with my own ears.

I was a...

Page 269

...still has to print the notice. The Levant Herald is too
fond of speaking praisefully...

Page 270

...of a friend. The cook took it away from
him and laid it before us....

Page 271

...the picture, just as I got it from incendiary books of travel.
It was a poor,...

Page 272

...place. I expected that
the spiced odors of Araby were going to steal over my...

Page 273

...time. Finally I said:

"It is a tedious process. It will take hours to...

Page 274

...to do the same with any thing else in the
world that is tedious, and wretched,...

Page 275

...in Constantinople warned us to be very careful about
our passports, see that they were strictly...

Page 276

...whatsoever direction you please, and your eye encounters
scarcely any thing but ruin, ruin, ruin!--fragments of...

Page 277

...death used to rage, are
peaceful enough now; no sound is heard, hardly a living thing...

Page 278

...party. However, it is not of any use for
me to expose the deception--it affords...

Page 279

...a familiar new look about the houses and every
thing; yea, and a driving and smothering...

Page 280

...understanding for its best interests--spent his fortune freely to
the same end--endowed it with a sound...

Page 281

...the bright colors of their palaces bud out here and there
like flowers. It is...

Page 282

...the death had occurred, but glad it
was over--where every body was smiling, and yet broken-hearted.

A...

Page 283

...and Princes, Admirals and Maids of Honor dropped into
free-and-easy chat with first one and then...

Page 284

...hum-drum life, and I had it here.
There was nothing stale or worn out about the...

Page 285

...the Emperor's, and conversation
continued as lively as ever.

It was a little after one o'clock, now....

Page 286

...and
generous nature. He must have been desirous of proving that Americans
were welcome guests in...

Page 287

...and
helped to destroy the provisions and keep the conversation lively, and
the Grand Duchess talked with...

Page 288

...my
acquaintance has a soldier any where about his house or his person.

Possibly it may be...

Page 289

... And time will wait for none, nor for us...

Page 290

...line he is making things move
along in this country He has traveled extensively in America....

Page 291

...report, has been the steadfast friend of the land
we love...

Page 292

...private citizens
of America, traveling simply for recreation, and unostentatiously, as
becomes our unofficial state!"

As I was...

Page 293

...we comprehend it
not until we see it. Smyrna is a very old city. ...

Page 294

...modern prophecy-savans have, is that
one of coolly and arbitrarily fitting the prophetic shirt on to...

Page 295

...her head. Verily, these things be
astonishing!"

Such things have a bad influence. They provoke...

Page 296

...heard of before, with a very pretty girl,
and we talked incessantly, and laughed exhaustingly, and...

Page 297

...goes when they depart!




CHAPTER XXXIX.

We inquired, and learned that the lions of Smyrna consisted of...

Page 298

...spotted
white with broken pillars, capitals and fragments of sculptured marble
that once adorned the lordly palaces...

Page 299

...palmy days, when the hills were covered with
palaces. I could believe in one restaurant, on...

Page 300

...on their
ascension robes, took a tearful leave of their friends, and made ready to
fly up...

Page 301

...in Grecian mythology. The idea of a
locomotive tearing through such a place as this,...

Page 302

...the right one and being belabored with clubs for it, and every now
and then a...

Page 303

...it is no human habitation. But for the crumbling arches and monstrous
piers and broken...

Page 304

...he can not go and stand yonder in the ruined theatre and
in imagination people it...

Page 305

...masonry that are as perfect in every detail as
they were the day those old Cyclopian...

Page 306

...the
faces that were dear unto their youth. Therefore they went through such
parties as fell...

Page 307

...make bodies whole again that are
corrupted by disease, and cleanse the soul from sin; but...

Page 308

...and said, Who is King in Ephesus? And the citizen answered and
said, Whence come...

Page 309

...things to
disgorge! He had an order from Constantinople to look out for our party,
and...

Page 310

...travels; such a marking out of
routes; such exasperating efforts to divide up the company into...

Page 311

...programme. We have never been much trouble to a
Consul before, but we have been...

Page 312

...to Jerusalem--from thence probably to the Dead
Sea, but possibly not--and then strike for the ocean...

Page 313

...these Lebanon hills to
build portions of King Solomon's Temple with.

Shortly after six, our pack train...

Page 314

...we
were used to in the great excursion steamer; knives and forks,
soup-plates, dinner-plates--every thing, in the...

Page 315

...conversation afterward. However, camping out, even though
it be in a gorgeous tent, makes one...

Page 316

...of nails for
supper.

While I am speaking of animals, I will mention that I have a...

Page 317

...only looked like he wanted to lean
up against something and think. Whenever he is...

Page 318

...e'er
-- For the Sons of God...

Page 319

...make it
difficult to find the place again without a divining-rod or a
diving-bell. The Syrians...

Page 320

...to a handful of shepherds, whose flocks
were doing what they honestly could to get a...

Page 321

...lasted so long. The Temple
of the Sun is nearly three hundred feet long and...

Page 322

...blocks are trifles in
size compared with the rough-hewn blocks that form the wide verandah or
platform...

Page 323

...pitiful nobodies between Kingdom Come and Baalbec would
inscribe their poor little names upon the walls...

Page 324

...unsparingly, and every night they call us together and
read to us chapters from the Testament...

Page 325

...in the saddle, even in a Christian land and a
Christian climate, and on a good...

Page 326

...of the Abana river
--only one-half mile down to where it...

Page 327

...simple camel-driver he reached this
point and looked down upon Damascus for the first time, and...

Page 328

...show that it really was the Garden
of Eden, and that the rivers Pharpar and Abana...

Page 329

...will into the vague past, there was always a Damascus. In the
writings of every...

Page 330

...in the wall
entered the hotel. We stood in a great flagged court, with flowers...

Page 331

...We lay on those divans
a long time, after supper, smoking narghilies and long-stemmed chibouks,
and talking...

Page 332

...bones were nearly
knocked out of joint, we were wild with excitement, and our sides ached
with...

Page 333

...started out on that bold missionary career which he
prosecuted till his death. It was...

Page 334

...were butchered indiscriminately and left to rot by hundreds all
through the Christian quarter; they say,...

Page 335

...great knots protruding from face and body,
joints decaying and dropping away--horrible!




CHAPTER XLV.

The last twenty-four hours...

Page 336

...the
ridiculous sights I ever have seen, our party of eight is the most so
--they do...

Page 337

...semblance of a Christian, at least.

Three or four hours out from Damascus we passed the...

Page 338

...surroundings are eminently in keeping with it.

I would not have gone into this dissertation upon...

Page 339

...utterly inaccessible, except in one place, where a bridle-path
winds upward among the solid rocks to...

Page 340

...said. However, it
generally does give me the cholera to take a bath.

The incorrigible pilgrims...

Page 341

...earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatsoever thou shalt
loose...

Page 342

...uncomfortable and
savage that he wants to exterminate the whole tribe.

These people about us had other...

Page 343

...not the slightest movement; their eyes were
riveted upon him with a fascination that nothing could...

Page 344

...after ten o'clock Saturday night without breaking the
Sabbath. Her child was a hard specimen,...

Page 345

...In boyhood I longed to be an Arab of the
desert and have a beautiful mare,...

Page 346

...upon any
different sort of earth than that we had always been used to, and see...

Page 347

...in a return to their rightful
allegiance. With all respect for those ancient Israelites, I...

Page 348

...cultivation--a rare sight in this country--an acre
or two of rich soil studded with last season's...

Page 349

...this blistering, naked, treeless
land.

Here you do not stop just when you please, but when you...

Page 350

...about Wm. C. Grimes'
Bedouins and sleep comfortably afterward. But I believe the Bedouins to
be...

Page 351

...he died." Such is the touching
language of the Bible. "The Song of Deborah...

Page 352

...Land, I have got every thing in Palestine on too large a scale.
Some of my...

Page 353

...will move again. The white city of the
Mellahah, resurrected for a moment out of...

Page 354

...to speak of it. He exposed himself to the sun too much
yesterday, but since...

Page 355

...was awful--but I never
heard him sing. Finally I said, This is a fraud--that is...

Page 356

...the march of his stately sentences; but the Old Testament
writers are hidden from view.

If the...

Page 357

...Esau. Why shall we not say a good
word for the princely Bedouin? The...

Page 358

...two or three scowling
Arabs, with their long guns, who were idling about the place, said...

Page 359

...infancy to revere,
almost to worship, the holy places whereon their happy eyes were resting
now. ...

Page 360

...wailing and gnashing of teeth in the camp. The two
Napoleons were offered--more if necessary--and...

Page 361

...then, because it
showed that they were only poor human people like us, after all.

So we...

Page 362

...several days' journey away, to be cured of their
diseases. Here he healed the centurion's...

Page 363

...anger, not suspecting
what he was? Who ever wonders what they thought when they saw...

Page 364

...most particularly celebrated by the presence of Christ are nearly
all right here in full view,...

Page 365

...to read that
they let a bed-ridden man down through the roof of a house in...

Page 366

...have raked together or
inherited. Most of these maidens were not wealthy, but some few...

Page 367

...because I am far more familiar with
it than with any other, and partly because I...

Page 368

...on the shore and fishes in the
water are all the creatures that are near to...

Page 369

...burial
places, as if they designed that when the voice of...

Page 370

...mountain by
any means, being too near the height of its immediate neighbors to be so.
That...

Page 371

...thing which,
when stripped for inspection, proves to be only an unobtrusive basin of
water, some mountainous...

Page 372

...their verdicts with them.
They have shown it in their conversation ever since we left Beirout.
I...

Page 373

...the secret noises of the
night he hears spirit voices; in the soft sweep of the...

Page 374

...was a tall Arab, as swarthy as an Indian;
young-say thirty years of age. On...

Page 375

...faintest appreciation of a joke, even though that joke
were so broad and so ponderous that...

Page 376

...customs are to America. The Sheik imposed
guards upon travelers and charged them for it....

Page 377

...his victory the more secure, he stationed
guards at the different...

Page 378

...their way through the Moslem ranks
and gained the summit of a little hill, and there,...

Page 379

...To the eastward lies the Valley
of the Jordan and beyond it the mountains of Gilead....

Page 380

...thinking all the time that the one last seen must be the
chiefest. And, verily,...

Page 381

...days of stout Gideon and parties that
flourished thirty centuries ago to the fresh yesterday of...

Page 382

...I think
that there, when a man orders a pair of pantaloons, he says he wants...

Page 383

...dragoman had paid his
master, but that counted as nothing--if you hire a man to sneeze...

Page 384

...stone.

They showed us a broken granite pillar, depending from the roof, which
they said was hacked...

Page 385

...even for the happy rascality of hewing out these
bogus grottoes in the rock; for it...

Page 386

...was a girl, and bear it
away in a jar upon her head. The water...

Page 387

...her large black eyes,
which gazed on him quite as curiously...

Page 388

... the rock? If it were a man, why did he not...

Page 389

...monk, two
Armenians and a Jew in our cortege, and all...

Page 390

...the fifteenth blow to
hear the confession. Then Grimes and his party rode away, and...

Page 391

...Whoever shall write the boyhood of Jesus ingeniously will
make a book which will possess a...

Page 392

...mantle and brings it home.

"Sent to a schoolmaster, refuses to...

Page 393

...States:

"199. They carry themselves high, and as prudent men;...

Page 394

...way. If I am accidentally murdered, some
time, during one of these romantic frenzies of...

Page 395

...is visible, and only
one tree. This is a fig-tree, which maintains a precarious footing...

Page 396

...at ornamentation. In the cities, there is
often no appearance of a grave at all;...

Page 397

...one.

We descended to the Plain again, and halted a moment at a well--of
Abraham's time, no...

Page 398

...him that from
him he had received no "kiss of welcome." It did not seem...

Page 399

...imaginary enemies; whooping, and
fluttering their rags in the wind, and carrying on in every respect...

Page 400

...fate of
Jezebel; and said that in the place where dogs licked the blood of
Naboth, dogs...

Page 401

...behind Shunem
lay the "Midianites, the Amalekites, and the Children of the East," who
were "as grasshoppers...

Page 402

...contained the body of John the
Baptist. This relic was long ago carried away to...

Page 403

...and propagated doctrines not in conformity with those
of the original Jewish creed. For thousands...

Page 404

...The superstitious Samaritans have always been afraid to hunt
for it. They believe it is...

Page 405

...their
ancestor, held some little time gone by, with the Messiah of the
Christians. It is...

Page 406

...earth, and caught glimpses of their blessed home through the
open gates of Heaven.

The pilgrims took...

Page 407

...the Tower of David, and the Garden of Gethsemane--and dating
from these landmarks could tell very...

Page 408

...and badly paved with stone, and are tolerably
crooked--enough so to make each street appear to...

Page 409

...but fight, also, in this sacred
place, if allowed to do it. Before you is...

Page 410

...of
white marble let into the floor. It was there that the risen Saviour
appeared to...

Page 411

...health. When
we listen to evidence like this, we cannot but believe. We would...

Page 412

...by a genius that was
under the command of King Solomon. When danger approached its...

Page 413

...be
the earth's centre, ages ago, and that when Christ was upon earth he set
all doubts...

Page 414

...that right under the roof of this same
great church, and not far away from that...

Page 415

...had
spoken.

In this altar they used to keep one of the most curious relics that human
eyes...

Page 416

...had found every thing and was
about to stop, she was told in a dream to...

Page 417

...the ashes of these renowned
crusaders were empty. Even the coverings of their tombs were...

Page 418

...To publicly
execute such a personage was sufficient in itself to make the locality of
the execution...

Page 419

...and not in a gloomy,
candle-lighted cell in a little corner of a vast church, up-stairs
--a...

Page 420

...reverend, venerable--for a
god died there; for fifteen hundred years its shrines have been wet with
the...

Page 421

...by so many masters, that it was like meeting an old friend
unexpectedly to come upon...

Page 422

...and story for more than eighteen hundred years as the
Wandering Jew. On the memorable...

Page 423

...thing he can not avoid; go where he will about the world, he
must never fail...

Page 424

...the Mohammedan knows,
outside of Mecca. Up to within a year or two past, no...

Page 425

...were to lose his scalp-lock and die before it grew again. The most
of them...

Page 426

...as long as a seven-octave piano, and about as thick
as such a piano is high....

Page 427

...find myself leaning for a moment on a ruined
wall and looking listlessly down into the...

Page 428

...failing under the accumulated fatigue
of days and days of ceaseless marching. All were willing.

The...

Page 429

...turned loose the
scapegoat and let him flee to the wilderness and bear away his
twelve-month load...

Page 430

...asserted itself, now.
Overwork and consequent exhaustion began to have their natural effect.
They began to master...

Page 431

...educated it entirely out of us
yet. It has a charm which, once tasted, a...

Page 432

...but somehow I could not keep him in the rear, to save my neck.
He was...

Page 433

...the rear. Our guards--two
gorgeous young Arab sheiks, with cargoes of swords, guns, pistols and
daggers...

Page 434

...brandish rusty guns, and shout and brag, and carry on like
lunatics, and thus scare away...

Page 435

...We nodded in the saddle, at times, and woke up
with a start to find that...

Page 436

...of their hopes at last, but the current was too swift, the water was
too cold!

It...

Page 437

...from the shores. It yields
quantities of asphaltum; fragments of it lie all about its...

Page 438

...yourself with your hands. You can sit, with your knees drawn
up to your chin...

Page 439

...we passed along, but never saw grain or crystal
of Lot's wife. It was a...

Page 440

...go outside the walls, or look upon a woman--for
no woman is permitted to enter Mars...

Page 441

...beds, and bringing water to wash in,
and paid no heed when we said it was...

Page 442

...solitude reigned. Even the scattering
groups of armed shepherds we met the afternoon before, tending...

Page 443

...can in any other in
Palestine that would be likely to inspire reflection. Beggars, cripples
and...

Page 444

...come here. They will say it when they get
home, fast enough, but why should...

Page 445

...legs bruised by the
passing freight. Jack was caught two or three times, and Dan...

Page 446

...Universal Gazetteer.] Simon the Tanner
formerly lived here. We went to his house. All...

Page 447

...Sea and the Sea of Galilee sleep in the midst of a
vast stretch of hill...

Page 448

...noted Sea of Galilee, where
Roman fleets once rode at anchor and the disciples of the...

Page 449

...intact; and so his short
pea jacket and his long, thin legs assisted to make him...

Page 450

... He goes briskly, he puts on no airs, he is docile,
though opinionated. Satan...

Page 451

...male and
female; babies, young boys and young girls; young married people, and
some who had passed...

Page 452

...hundred dollars in
gold would do it. Mr. Beach gave his check for the money...

Page 453

...patched with old scraps of oil cloth--a hall that sank under one's
...

Page 454

...it once. Well, you take it along--but I
swear it...

Page 455

... What did he say he
wants with those books?"

...

Page 456

...are under inspection. I will go
and select one before the choice animals are all...

Page 457

...like Eve before the fall. We would have called her
thirteen at home; but here...

Page 458

...to be the bed of a railway the
Sultan means to build for no other reason...

Page 459

...it, too, for we were
purposely spread very far apart over the vast side of the...

Page 460

...and marked by the
diminishing stature of receding clusters of palms. It lay asleep in...

Page 461

...last, a black peg on the
summit, and waved his pigmy scarf! Then he crept...

Page 462

...thought we ought to be
nearing the top of the pyramid again, and then came to...

Page 463

...depth of St. Peter's at Rome--which is to say that each
side of Cheops extends seven...

Page 464

...Because the coopers were starting up
the hill to inquire.

Still, that mountain, prodigious as it was,...

Page 465

...deeds of all ages, which reveals to one
something of what he shall feel when he...

Page 466

...the great chandeliers that hang in the mosque, and how they
fill the whole place with...

Page 467

...a thousand mounds
above high water-mark the length and breadth of Egypt--villages of the
lower classes; I...

Page 468

...which had all
those curious surgical instruments which science has invented recently;
which had in high excellence...

Page 469

...their backs. It is
well they are not cows--it would...

Page 470

...Monotony till midnight.--Whereupon, dominoes.

"Monday--Morning, dominoes. Afternoon, dominoes. Evening,
...

Page 471

...rare,
in my career, to render a diary necessary. I still reflect with pride,
however, that...

Page 472

...his. It seemed tolerably good. The incipient mutineer was more
outraged than ever, then,...

Page 473

...disappearing and anon again appearing through jungle
walls of brilliant foliage, restored the energies dulled by...

Page 474

...will print an article which I wrote for the New York
Herald the night we arrived....

Page 475

...in some respects, in some it was not.
Originally it was...

Page 476

... a laconic item or two in the journals they opened on such an
...

Page 477

...pay, and there are no refreshments to saw off,
and, consequently,...

Page 478

...in the year of
our Lord 1867, that called themselves Americans,...

Page 479

...we visited.
When we left the Azores, we wore awful capotes...

Page 480

...could
muster. We prowled through the Holy Land, from Cesarea...

Page 481

... the missionary zeal of Jehu; we rioted--fairly rioted among the holy
...

Page 482

...expedition
accomplished all that its programme promised that it should
...

Page 483

...grand excursion, and so I say without
hesitation that I would be glad enough to sail...

Page 484

...in which our excursion was
conducted. Its programme was faithfully carried out--a thing which
surprised me,...

Page 485

...up in the flush of sunset, full of dignity and grace,
strongly outlined as a mountain.

We...