The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade)

By Mark Twain

Page 0

...Archive: American Libraries.






[Illustration: Photo of the Author with Signature "S. L. Clemens"]

THE ADVENTURES

OF

HUCKLEBERRY FINN

(TOM SAWYER'S...

Page 1

...on a New Life
VI. Pap Struggles with the Death Angel
...

Page 2

...this
last. The shadings have not been done in a haphazard fashion, or by
guesswork; but painstakingly,...

Page 3

...table you couldn't go right to
eating, but you had to wait for the widow to...

Page 4

...I made up my mind I wouldn't try for it. But I never
said so, because...

Page 5

...do that when you've lost a
horseshoe that you've found, instead of nailing it up over...

Page 6

...it ag'in."

So he set down on the ground betwixt me and Tom. He leaned his...

Page 7

...and,
after that, every time he told it he spread it more and more, till by
and...

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...yards, and then the cave
opened up. Tom poked about amongst the passages, and pretty soon
ducked...

Page 9

...others. Well, nobody could think
of anything to do--everybody was stumped, and set still. I was...

Page 10

...why. Now, Ben Rogers, do you
want to do things regular, or don't you?--that's the idea....

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...prayed, but nothing come of it. She told me to pray every
day, and whatever I...

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...was sober and could get his hands on me; though I used to take
to the...

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...though they was only lath and broomsticks, and
you might scour at them till you rotted,...

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...the ring. They belong to whoever rubs
the lamp or the ring, and they've got to...

Page 15

...good and cheered me up. So the longer I went to
school the easier it got...

Page 16

...your
interest?"

"No, sir," I says; "is there some for me?"

"Oh, yes, a half-yearly is in last...

Page 17

...say nothing about
the dollar I got from the judge.) I said it was pretty bad...

Page 18

...in a minute I see I was mistaken--that is,
after the first jolt, as you may...

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...to stand it--you
hear? Say, lemme hear you read."

I took up a book and begun something...

Page 20

...was gone he come back and put his head in again,
and told me to mind...

Page 21

...so they cried again. And when it was bedtime the
old man rose up and held...

Page 22

...his line.

He got to hanging around the widow's too much, and so she told him...

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...me in. Once he locked me in and was gone three days. It was
dreadful lonesome....

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...and everybody he could think
of, and then cussed them all over again to make sure...

Page 25

...law a-standing ready to take a man's son away from him--a
man's own son, which he...

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...get there; but when they told me there was a state in
this country where they'd...

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...always his word. I
judged he would be blind drunk in about an hour, and then...

Page 28

...and then I couldn't come for him no more. I begged, and told him I
was...

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...and t'other one out
for what the rise might fetch along. Well, all at once here...

Page 30

...me out, you
hear? That man warn't here for no good. I'd a shot him. Next...

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...and one against it to hold it
there, for it was bent up at that place...

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...cooking.
Then I carried the sack about a hundred yards across the grass and
through the willows...

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...over the water. I listened. Pretty
soon I made it out. It was that dull kind...

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...I could hear the
mumble, and now and then a laugh, too, but it seemed a...

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...elbow
and listens; pretty soon I hears it again. I hopped up, and went and
looked out...

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...The
ferryboat was floating with the current, and I allowed I'd have a
chance to see who...

Page 37

...kind of a tent out of my blankets to put my
things under so the rain...

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...got to camp I warn't feeling very brash, there warn't much sand
in my craw; but...

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...down to the foot of the island.
A little ripply, cool breeze begun to blow, and...

Page 40

...what you live on?"

"I couldn' git nuffn else," he says.

"Why, how long you been on...

Page 41

...a nigger
trader roun' de place considable lately, en I begin to git oneasy.
Well, one night...

Page 42

...says, a raff is what
I's arter; it doan' _make_ no track.

"I see a light a-comin'...

Page 43

...done it. I was going to catch some of
them, but Jim wouldn't let me. He...

Page 44

...Misto
Bradish? Well, he sot up a bank, en say anybody dat put in a dollar
would...

Page 45

...wisht I had de money, I wouldn' want no mo'."




CHAPTER IX


I wanted to go and...

Page 46

...that the trees off a little ways looked dim and spider-webby;
and here would come a...

Page 47

...them.

One night we catched a little section of a lumber-raft--nice pine
planks. It was twelve foot...

Page 48

...account. The way things was scattered about we reckoned
the people left in a hurry, and...

Page 49

...house stole the coat, because if they'd
'a' knowed the money was there they wouldn't 'a'...

Page 50

...but every time he come to himself
he went to sucking at the jug again. His...

Page 51

...Jim said he
hadn't ever seen a bigger one. He would 'a' been worth a good...

Page 52

...know; so I knocked at the door, and made up my mind I
wouldn't forget I...

Page 53

...himself."

"No--is that so?"

"Most everybody thought it at first. He'll never know how nigh he come
to...

Page 54

...with an old couple that lives next door in
the log shanty, and they happened to...

Page 55

...yes'm, I did. Sarah Mary Williams. Sarah's my first name. Some
calls me Sarah, some calls...

Page 56

...a poor girl like me, mum. If I'm in the
way here, I'll--"

"No, you won't. Set...

Page 57

...first?"

"The hind end, mum."

"Well, then, a horse?"

"The for'rard end, mum."

"Which side of a tree does...

Page 58

...for I didn't want no blinders on then. When I was about
the middle I heard...

Page 59

...on them as I could.

When the first streak of day began to show we tied...

Page 60

...We fixed up a short forked
stick to hang the old lantern on, because we must...

Page 61

...it. Jim said he reckoned the widow was partly right and pap was
partly right; so...

Page 62

...and the pilot-house; and do you reckon anybody's going to
resk his life for a texas...

Page 63

...hound in
this country."

By this time Jim was gone for the raft. I was just a-biling...

Page 64

...couldn't see
them, but I could tell where they was by the whisky they'd been
having. I...

Page 65

...hunt up their boat and
set her drifting down the river so these fellows can't get...

Page 66

...half
second I was in the boat, and Jim come tumbling after me. I out with
my...

Page 67

...and
I told Jim to float along down, and show a light when he judged he...

Page 68

...a scrape?"

"Easy enough. Miss Hooker was a-visiting up there to the town--"

"Yes, Booth's Landing--go on."

"She...

Page 69

...and got into my skiff and bailed her out, and then pulled up
shore in the...

Page 70

...inside the wreck and at the
ferryboat, and I said these kinds of things was adventures;...

Page 71

...wise man want to live in de mids' er sich a
blim-blammin' all de time? No--'deed...

Page 72

...But you take a man dat's got 'bout five million chillen
runnin' roun' de house, en...

Page 73

...man, Huck?"

"No."

"Well, den, dey ain't no sense in a cat talkin' like a man. Is...

Page 74

...have to hold your hands still at such a
time. I whooped and listened. Away down...

Page 75

...No, you _feel_ like you are laying dead
still on the water; and if a little...

Page 76

...on both banks; just a solid wall, as well as I could
see by the stars....

Page 77

...de islands en one un
us got los' en t'other one was jis' as good as...

Page 78

...I got on to the raft, but it
was clearing up again now.

"Oh, well, that's all...

Page 79

...went drifting down into a big bend, and the night clouded up and
got hot. The...

Page 80

...up and says,
every time, "But you knowed he was running for his freedom, and you
could...

Page 81

...felt easy and happy and light as a
feather right off. All my troubles was gone....

Page 82

...and let's get along."

I buckled to my paddle and they laid to their oars. When...

Page 83

...and you'll be all
right."

"That's so, my boy--good-by, good-bye. If you see any runaway niggers
you get...

Page 84

...in bundles,
and getting all ready to quit rafting.

That night about ten we hove in sight...

Page 85

...we got a chance to
buy a canoe to go back in. We warn't going to...

Page 86

...I bounced for the top in a hurry, for I was
nearly busting. I popped out...

Page 87

...ready, take your places."

"All ready."

"Now, George Jackson, do you know the Shepherdsons?"

"No, sir; I never...

Page 88

...be he's hungry?"

"True for you, Rachel--I forgot."

So the old lady says:

"Betsy" (this was a nigger...

Page 89

...that you throw in.
Do you like to comb up Sundays, and all that kind of...

Page 90

...nice and
had so much style. It didn't have an iron latch on the front door,...

Page 91

...it
now and then. The statements was interesting, but tough. Another was
Friendship's Offering, full of beautiful...

Page 92

...she had done what they had lost.
But I reckoned that with her disposition she was...

Page 93

...Nor stomach troubles laid him low,
Young Stephen Dowling Bots.

...

Page 94

...there was plenty of niggers, and she sewed there a
good deal and read her Bible...

Page 95

...you had confidence. Sometimes he smiled, and it was good to
see; but when he straightened...

Page 96

...a lot of farms and over a hundred niggers.
Sometimes a stack of people would come...

Page 97

...by
ourselves, I says:

"Did you want to kill him, Buck?"

"Well, I bet I did."

"What did he...

Page 98

...in front, you
know, and the old man he rode up and shot him down. But...

Page 99

...left it in the seat at church between two
other books, and would I slip out...

Page 100

...a mile; then he struck out over the swamp, and waded
ankle-deep as much as another...

Page 101

...so fur under water, en de night hadn't ben
so dark, en we warn't so sk'yerd,...

Page 102

...'bout half an hour ago--maybe a little mo'--en' I
_tell_ you dey warn't no time los'....

Page 103

...didn't do no
good, the boys had too good a start; they got to the woodpile...

Page 104

...was mighty downhearted; so I made up
my mind I wouldn't ever go anear that house...

Page 105

...signal lantern, and
judged that we was free and safe once more. I hadn't had a...

Page 106

...on
t'other side of the river, being a wood-yard, likely, and piled by
them cheats so you...

Page 107

...too good to be comfortable, and besides I didn't go
much on clothes, nohow.

Sometimes we'd have...

Page 108

...men tearing up the path as
tight as they could foot it. I thought I was...

Page 109

...I was expecting trouble myself, and would
scatter out _with_ you. That's the whole yarn--what's yourn?"

"Well,...

Page 110

...done,
and take everything from me--loved ones, property, everything; but it
can't take that. Some day I'll...

Page 111

...and so on, and a body could see it was mighty
pleasing to him.

But the old...

Page 112

...comfortable. But the duke kind of
soured on him, and didn't look a bit satisfied with...

Page 113

...brother Ike. Pa, he 'lowed
he'd break up and go down and live with Uncle Ben,...

Page 114

...to be some more trouble amongst them; so we was pretty glad when
the duke says:

"'Tis...

Page 115

...again, though, and Jim was going to call me; but he
changed his mind, because he...

Page 116

...look oncommon odd on her, maybe."

"No, don't you worry; these country jakes won't ever think...

Page 117

...the wagon-troughs and stomping to keep off
the flies. There was sheds made out of poles...

Page 118

...so on. You couldn't make out what the preacher said any more, on
account of the...

Page 119

...their
cheeks, would up and ask him would he let them kiss him for to
remember him...

Page 120

...runaway nigger with
a bundle on a stick over his shoulder, and "$200 reward" under it....

Page 121

...on the corner of the
raft, and pulled off his boots and rolled up his britches,...

Page 122

...his head tilted back,
looking up at the sky; and then he begins to rip and...

Page 123

...first rate. It seemed like he was just born for it; and
when he had his...

Page 124

...consecutive nights in Paris!
For One Night Only,
On account of...

Page 125

...he says:

"_You_ give him a chaw, did you? So did your sister's cat's
grandmother. You pay...

Page 126

...but it was dangersome, because sometimes a strip of land as wide
as a house caves...

Page 127

...on, calling Sherburn everything he could lay his tongue
to, and the whole street packed with...

Page 128

...the run, and two men with her. Boggs and the men
turned round to see who...

Page 129

...big crowd packed around each one of these fellows,
stretching their necks and listening. One long,...

Page 130

...a word. The racket stopped, and the
wave sucked back.

Sherburn never said a word--just stood there,...

Page 131

...here, swearing what big
things you're going to do. The pitifulest thing out is a mob;...

Page 132

...them dancing, first one
foot out in the air and then the other, the horses leaning...

Page 133

...sure
enough, all the circus men could do, the horse broke loose, and away
he went like...

Page 134

...village.
The bills said:


AT THE COURT HOUSE!
FOR 3 NIGHTS ONLY!
...

Page 135

...and see it.

Twenty people sings out:

"What, is it over? Is that _all_?"

The duke says...

Page 136

...done it, and he done the same. We struck the raft at the same time,
and...

Page 137

...And they chop it off.
'Fetch up Jane Shore,' he says; and up she comes. Next...

Page 138

...hanker for no mo' un um, Huck. Dese is all I
kin stan'."

"It's the way I...

Page 139

...open _yit_, en dat chile
stannin' mos' right in it, a-lookin' down and mournin', en de...

Page 140

...in front of the wigwam. Jim was satisfied. He said it was a
sight better than...

Page 141

...then went
scooting along the bluff bank in the easy water. Pretty soon we come
to a...

Page 142

...was too young
to be much company for him, except Mary Jane, the red-headed one; and
so...

Page 143

...stop for a hail. A Cincinnati boat
will, but this is a St. Louis one."

"Was Peter...

Page 144

...put off in a yawl, a steamboat kin afford to carry 'em, can't it?"

So they...

Page 145

...all lit up like glory, she was so glad her
uncles was come. The king he...

Page 146

...dear sympathy
and these holy tears, and so he thanks them out of his heart and...

Page 147

...of them
out of that young flathead that we canoed up to the steamboat.

Then Mary Jane...

Page 148

...to
haul out yaller-boys out of his pocket.

"It's a most amaz'n' good idea, duke--you _have_ got...

Page 149

...cold but
joyful."

Mary Jane she went for him, Susan and the hare-lip went for the duke,
and...

Page 150

...news? This is Harvey Wilks."

The king he smiled eager, and shoved out his flapper, and...

Page 151

...matter. But I warn you all that a
time's coming when you're going to feel sick...

Page 152

...the others was helping the niggers clean
up the things. The hare-lip she got to pumping...

Page 153

...more?"

"What!--to preach before a king? I never did see such a girl as you.
They don't...

Page 154

...and I said I wouldn't swallow it all; and that's
every bit and grain I _did_...

Page 155

...up in the business before it was done
with, I judge. No; there ain't no good...

Page 156

...down the river with what we've got. Specially, seeing we got
it so easy--_given_ back to...

Page 157

...from where I was. I
stuck tight to the wall and kept mighty still, though quivery;...

Page 158

...only
place I see to hide the bag was in the coffin. The lid was shoved
along...

Page 159

...from the
neighbors till the hall and the parlor and the dining-room was full. I
see the...

Page 160

...and
more outrageous all the time; and at last, when he had gone around two
sides of...

Page 161

...and he give out the idea that his
congregation over in England would be in a...

Page 162

...I tell
you the duke was powerful uneasy.

Next day was auction day. About broad day in...

Page 163

...wouldn't
want a better lay-out than that--and here we've gone and sold 'em for
a song. Yes,...

Page 164

...She said
the beautiful trip to England was most about spoiled for her; she
didn't know _how_...

Page 165

...back and set down again, and says:

"Don't you holler. Just set still and take it...

Page 166

...we'll do, and you won't have to
stay at Mr. Lothrop's so long, nuther. How fur...

Page 167

...can't collect the money for the _niggers_
yet--they're in the worst kind of a fix, Miss...

Page 168

...and I had to shove it into the
first place I come to, and run--and it...

Page 169

...and a many a
million times, and of her saying she would pray for me; and...

Page 170

...is a kind of a
harrow, as you may say--and it ain't no slouch of a...

Page 171

...and come to the auction and
buy this house, because she allowed her uncle Peter would...

Page 172

...turn pale. But no, nary a pale
did _they_ turn. The duke he never let on...

Page 173

...old gentlemen said, and was
listening to the king now. And when the king got done...

Page 174

...gang in a pretty
tight place right at the outstart. But the king he only looked
sorrowful,...

Page 175

...wouldn't strain myself if I was you. I reckon you
ain't used to lying, it don't...

Page 176

...mine too. Look at both, please--they're by the same hand."

The lawyer done it, and says:

"I...

Page 177

...that old blister for clean
out-and-out cheek.

The new old gentleman turns brisk towards Ab Turner and...

Page 178

...if I wanted to, and see all the fun, and
have Mary Jane at my back...

Page 179

...I fairly flew--leastways, I had it
all to myself except the solid dark, and the now-and-then...

Page 180

...it _did_
seem so good to be free again and all by ourselves on the big...

Page 181

...But the duke says:

"You better a blame' sight give _yourself_ a good cussing, for you're
the...

Page 182

...I _did_, I didn't _do_ it, anyway. But you not
only had it in mind to...

Page 183

...for days and days; kept right along
down the river. We was down south in the...

Page 184

..."and when you get through robbing it you'll come back here and
wonder what has become...

Page 185

...if I hollered he'd cut my livers out--and told me to
lay down and stay where...

Page 186

...around that Huck
Finn helped a nigger to get his freedom; and if I was ever...

Page 187

...out.

So I was full of trouble, full as I could be; and didn't know what...

Page 188

...they was said. And I let them stay said;
and never thought no more about reforming....

Page 189

...raft?--got her in a good place?"

I says:

"Why, that's just what I was going to ask...

Page 190

...money, so I give him ten cents, but begged him to
spend it for something to...

Page 191

...clear out," he says; "and you can tell Mr. Foster whatever you
want to. Maybe you...

Page 192

...row t'other side the smokehouse; one little hut all by itself
away down against the back...

Page 193

...and behind her comes her little white
children, acting the same way the little niggers was...

Page 194

...a family in Baton Rouge that knowed his people very well. Yes,
I remember now, he...

Page 195

...to begin; but she grabbed me and hustled me
in behind the bed, and says:

"Here he...

Page 196

...so glad to find out who I was. Well, they
froze to me for two hours;...

Page 197

...on them. You come in
here and feel of me if you don't believe me."

So he...

Page 198

...of a trip. The old gentleman was at the door,
and he says:

"Why, this is wonderful!...

Page 199

...your dinner with
us; and then we'll hitch up and take you down to Nichols's."

"Oh, I...

Page 200

...it. They all said
it--every one of them. But I'm sorry, m'am, and I won't do...

Page 201

...had dinner out in that broad open passage betwixt the house and the
kitchen; and there...

Page 202

...it _was_ the king
and the duke, though they was all over tar and feathers, and...

Page 203

...we found it out detective fashion; I
wouldn't give shucks for any other way. Now you...

Page 204

...a character to lose;
and folks at home that had characters; and he was bright and...

Page 205

...that
joined the hut at the eaves, and was made out of plank. It was as...

Page 206

...been a-going to do.
So Tom says:

"What's the vittles for? Going to feed the dogs?"

The...

Page 207

...But it's awluz jis' so; people
dat's _sot_, stays sot; dey won't look into noth'n' en...

Page 208

...use trying to travel with a ten-foot chain on his leg.
Why, drat it, Huck, it's...

Page 209

...says:

"What do we want of a moat when we're going to snake him out from
under...

Page 210

...is just as good to load up a pie with, and hide in a straw...

Page 211

...else."

"Well, then, what's the sense in wasting the plates?"

"Why, blame it all, it ain't the...

Page 212

...we went and set down on the
woodpile to talk. He says:

"Everything's all right now except...

Page 213

...from down there by New Orleans.
He'll hear Jim ain't from there. Then his next move...

Page 214

...work. If we was prisoners
it would, because then we'd have as many years as we...

Page 215

...never said a word.

He was always just that particular. Full of principle.

So then I got...

Page 216

...think of; and was for
having us hunt up a cold-chisel to cut the chain off...

Page 217

...lives and leave Jim to our
children to get out; for he believed Jim would come...

Page 218

...I could git my
han's on one er dem witches jis' wunst--on'y jis' wunst--it's all I'd
ast....

Page 219

...with
one hand and cracking the handiest child's head with her thimble with
the other, and says:

"I've...

Page 220

...six _candles_ gone--that's what. The rats could 'a' got the
candles, and I reckon they did;...

Page 221

...put it in, and that will show that I laid
the Testament down and took up...

Page 222

...says:

"Why, Aunt Sally, there ain't but nine spoons _yet_."

She says:

"Go 'long to your play, and...

Page 223

...the spoon
and the candles, by the help of the calf and the rats and the...

Page 224

...a dough
roof, and shut down the lid, and put hot embers on top, and stood...

Page 225

...one which he reckoned he'd decide on. He says:

"On the scutcheon we'll have a bend...

Page 226

...year to scrabble such a lot of truck onto the logs with a
nail, and he...

Page 227

...through; but Jim he took the pick and soon made it big
enough. Then Tom marked...

Page 228

...glory? No, sah, I doan' want no sich
doin's."

"Blame it, can't you _try?_ I only _want_...

Page 229

...spiders and things begin to feel worried
about you, and come. And they'll just fairly swarm...

Page 230

...a prisoner ever had in the world
to make a name for himself, and yet he...

Page 231

...them dripping from the rafters and
places every now and then; and they generly landed in...

Page 232

...took turn about, so when the snakes was asleep the rats
was on deck, and when...

Page 233

...confiding
and mullet-headed they don't take notice of nothing at all. So if we
don't _give_ them...

Page 234

...a sweat. They
couldn't 'a' been worse scared if the place had 'a' been full of
ghosts...

Page 235

...good after breakfast, and took my canoe and went
over the river a-fishing, with a lunch,...

Page 236

...every little thing that warn't yard-stick straight; so she
says, very decided:

"You just march into that...

Page 237

...hat, and out comes
the bread and what was left of the butter, and she grabbed...

Page 238

...set his ear to the crack and
listened, and listened, and listened, and the steps a-scraping...

Page 239

...'uz planned beautiful, en
it 'uz _done_ beautiful; en dey ain't _nobody_ kin git up a...

Page 240

...and then take and lead him all around
the back alleys and everywheres in the dark,...

Page 241

...we going to do?--lay
around there till he lets the cat out of the bag? No,...

Page 242

...that glad to see me she laughed and
cried both, and hugged me, and give me...

Page 243

...as I was a-sayin' to
Brer Phelps, his own self. S'e, what do _you_ think of...

Page 244

...can!--_any_ of
you!"

"Well, it does beat--"

"Laws alive, I never--"

"So help me, I wouldn't 'a' be--"

"_House_-thieves as...

Page 245

...and well and she
had us still, stead of fretting over what was past and done....

Page 246

...wouldn't 'a' went, not for kingdoms.

But she was on my mind and Tom was on...

Page 247

...to hang Jim for an example to
all the other niggers around there, so they wouldn't...

Page 248

...he done it, too, and done it very well. Of course I
judged he must be...

Page 249

...them promised,
right out and hearty, that they wouldn't cuss him no more.

Then they come out...

Page 250

...of his head again!"

"_No_, I ain't out of my HEAD; I know all what I'm...

Page 251

...Harry out o' both o' ye!"

But Tom, he _was_ so proud and joyful, he just...

Page 252

...he changed so? Why, that ain't
_Tom_, it's Sid; Tom's--Tom's--why, where is Tom? He was here...

Page 253

...Sally.

"Well, I wonder! Why, I wrote you twice to ask you what you could mean
by...

Page 254

...so
good, and Jim was pleased most to death and busted out, and says:

"_Dah_, now, Huck,...