Sketches New and Old, Part 4.

By Mark Twain

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...SKETCHES NEW AND OLD

by Mark Twain

Part 4.



THE LATE BENJAMIN FRANKLIN--[Written about 1870.]

["Never put off till...

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...said once, in one of his inspired flights
of malignity:

...

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...muskets.
He observed, with his customary force, that the bayonet was very well
under some circumstances, but...

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...burst into tears. We were so
moved at his distress that we did not think...

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...all take warning by
this solemn occurrence, and let us endeavor...

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...enough about him to get one
interested in his career, and then drops him. Who...

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...Mr. Bloke's friends, he
will append such explanatory notes to his account of it as will...

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...from that time forward we feared nothing.

"When you were ten years old, a daughter was...

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...old baron sat silent for many minutes after his daughter's departure,
and then he turned to...

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...so loved and praised and honored of all men
as Conrad was, could not be otherwise...

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...worshipped Conrad!'"

"Conrad groaned aloud. A sickly pallor overspread his countenance, and
he trembled like an...

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...bed broken-hearted. His days were numbered.
Poor Conrad had begged, as for his very life,...

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...man!"

An appalling conviction of his helpless, hopeless peril struck a chill to
Conrad's heart like the...

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...Scott or
Burns or Milton in a hundred years, the lawmakers of the "Great" Republic
are content...

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...can say,--and say with pride, that we have some
legislatures that bring higher prices than any...

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... guests much, all further oratory would be dispensed with during the
...

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...summon your fortitude--do not tremble. I am about to reveal
the past."

"Information concerning the future...

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...a man
of unsteady habits, and gave way to violent fits of passion. The girl
declined...

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...great eclat, at the head
of an imposing procession composed of clergymen, officials, citizens
generally, and young...

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...into
the best New Hampshire society in the other world."

I then took leave of the fortune-teller....

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...so seemingly heartless and
treacherous, that if Baldwin had not been insane he would have been
hanged...

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...course the jury then acquitted him. But it was a merciful providence
that Mrs. H.'s...

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...her. Upon one occasion he declined
to go to a wedding with her, and when...

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...is
"not right." If, an hour after the murder, he seems ill at ease,
preoccupied, and...

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...Baxter Copmanhurst," with "May,
1839," as the date of his death. Deceased sat wearily down...

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...old graveyard, and have for these thirty
years; and I tell you things are changed since...

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...wearily, and our gravestones bow their heads discouraged; there be
no adornments any more--no roses, nor...

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...it, that resides in a plebeian graveyard over yonder--I think so
because the first time I...

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... Smiling should especially be
avoided. What he might honestly consider a shining success was...

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...JUST REWARD'

on it, and I was proud when I first saw it, but by and...

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...can't afford to repair it.
Put a new bottom in her, and part of a new...

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...which are not on the map now, and vanished from it
and from the earth as...

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...it.
She would let off peal after of laughter, and then sit with her face in
her...

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...when dey talk' back at her, she up an' she says,
'Look-a-heah!' she says, 'I want...

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...de Unions took dat town dey all run away an' lef' me all
by myse'f wid...

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...see I didn't
know nuffin 'bout dis. How was I gwyne to know it?

"Well, one...

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...ole Blue hen's Chickens, I is!'--an' den I see
dat young man stan' a-starin' an' stiff,...