Sketches New and Old, Part 2.

By Mark Twain

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...SKETCHES NEW AND OLD

by Mark Twain

Part 2.



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS--[Written about 1865.]

"MORAL STATISTICIAN."--I don't want any...

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...are always down on your knees, with your eyes buried in
the cushion, when the contribution-box...

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...a cheerful, stirnn'
cretur, always doin' somethin', and no man can...

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... He done...

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... He done it with a zest;
...

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...affections upon another. What would you advise me to
do?"

You...

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...complete without the intention. And ergo, in the strict
spirit of the law, since you...

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...any
comfort.


"ARTHUR AUGUSTUS."--No; you are wrong; that is the proper way to throw a
brickbat or a...

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...operations (conceived, planned, and earned
out by itself, and without suggestion or assistance from its mother...

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...ways of children, it is possible that I have
been magnifying into matter of surprise things...

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...your brains out.






TO RAISE POULTRY

--[Being a letter written to a Poultry Society that had conferred...

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...it, and you
carry a long slender plank. This is a frosty night, understand. ...

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...use in my pouring out my whole intellect on this subject?
I have shown the Western...

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...no more, my dear. I now see the force of your reasoning, and I...

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...bag and baggage, to our own bedroom once more, and felt a
great gladness, like storm-buffeted...

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...do give them to me! Don't you know that every moment is precious
now? ...

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...to suppose anything about the cat. It never would
have occurred if Maria had been...

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...be found upon the child. Well, toward
morning the wood gave out and my wife...

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...refer to.
Hence the tide of our days flows by in deep and untroubled serenity.

[Very few...

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...merely because I thought it was my duty
to make the paper lively.

Next I gently touched...

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...thirty-three new subscribers,
and had the vegetables to show for it, cordwood, cabbage, beans, and
unsalable turnips...

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...and
behind; I fumed and sweated and charged and ranted till I was hoarse and
sick and...

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...useless and a nuisance,
a cumberer of the earth." The bore and his comrades--for there...

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...that transcends any other that men suffer.
Physical pain is pastime to it, and hanging a...

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...for Beirut, calculating to head off the other vessel.
When he arrived in Jerusalem with his...

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...his will he gave the
contract bill to his uncle, by the name of O-be-joyful Johnson....

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...said, "Your Imperial Highness, on or about the 10th day of October--"

"That is sufficient, sir....

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...next week I got through the Claims Department; the third week I began
and completed the...

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... He waved me back, and
said there was something yet to be done first.

"Where is...

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...to the most of our tribe. I begin to
feel that I, too, am called."

"Young...

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...in
progress in Florida, the crops, herds, and houses of Mr. George Fisher,
a citizen, were destroyed,...

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...allow interest from the date of the first
petition (1832) to the date when the bill...

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...contents, and
the liquor" (the most trifling part of the destruction, and set down at
only $3,200...

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...go through those papers and report to Mr.
Floyd what amount was still due the emaciated...

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... ...

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... 1814 to November 1860, 46 years and 2 months, ..35,317.50

...

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...them on that fruitful corn-field), and as long as they
choose to come they will find...