Roughing It, Part 8.

By Mark Twain

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...ROUGHING IT

...

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...spanned by two magnificent
rainbows. Two men who were in advance of us rode through...

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...and think,
and wish the ship would make the land--for we had not eaten much for...

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... Who Discovered these Islands
A. D. ...

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...it in Sunday School
myself, on general principles, although at a time when I did not...

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...I observed a bevy of nude native young ladies bathing in the sea,
and went and...

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...believed Cook was Lono to the day of their death;
but many did not, for they...

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...whether a god might not groan as well as
a man if it suited his convenience...

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...you keep still. This outrigger is formed
of two long bent sticks like plow handles,...

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...upon a large company of naked natives, of both sexes and
all ages, amusing themselves with...

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...have brought his
feet upon the sacred ground and barred him against all harm. Where...

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...would
weigh a few thousand pounds), which the high chief who held sway over
this district many...

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...so long
before his time that the knowledge of who constructed it has passed out
of the...

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... We made nearly a
two days' journey of it, but that was on account of...

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...rich crimson luster, which was subdued to a
pale rose tint in the depressions between. ...

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...of Massachusetts done in chain lightning on a midnight
sky. Imagine it--imagine a coal-black sky...

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...and discharged
sprays of stringy red fire--of about the consistency of mush, for
instance--from ten to fifteen...

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...wall, and
reached the bottom in safety.

The irruption of the previous evening had spent its force...

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...an
ingenious man. He said it was not the lantern that had informed him that
we...

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...hanging shelf we sat on tumbled into the
lake, jarring the surroundings like an earthquake and...

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...the trip, because our Kanaka
horses would not go by a house or a hut without...

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...island of Hawaii, we saw a laced and ruffled cataract
of limpid water leaping from a...

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...four to get
him shod, rode him two hundred miles, and then sold him for fifteen
dollars....

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...one afternoon; then camped, and next
day climbed the remaining nine thousand feet, and anchored on...

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...will not offer
any figures of my own, but give official ones--those of Commander Wilkes,
U.S.N., who...

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...with
interest for some minutes, and listening as critically to what we were
saying as if he...

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...needn't look so questioning, gentlemen; here's old Cap Saltmarsh
can say whether I know what I'm...

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...miles! It did, by the everlasting hills! And I'm telling you
nothing but the...

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...didn't look any bigger
than a little small bee--and then he went out of sight! ...

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...they sat on him again, and changed their verdict to "suicide
induced by mental aberration"--because, said...

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...make a
humiliating failure of it.

They said that as I had never spoken in public, I...

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...and smile, as a signal, when
I had been delivered of an obscure joke--"and then," I...

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...a crash, mingled with cheers. It made my hair raise, it was so
close to...

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...almost an unknown commodity in
the Pacific market. They are not so rare, now, I...

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...not?"

I dropped my hands to my pockets and said:

Certainly! I--"

"Put up your hands! ...

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...prudence to keep still. When everything had
been taken from me,--watch, money, and a multitude...

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...before I came, and there was very little fun in that; they were so
chilled that...

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...thinks he is done, now, and that this book has no moral to
it, he is...

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...with him
several hundred converts to his preaching. His influence among the
brethren augmented with every...

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...for years the enormous migration across the plains
to California poured through the land of the...

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...simple, of an inferior order of intellect, unacquainted with
the world and its ways; and let...

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...Mormons, or got scared and
discomforted beyond all endurance and left the Territory. If a...

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...the "spoil"
of an enemy when the Lord had so manifestly "delivered it into their
hand?"

Wherefore, according...

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...having
(apparently) visited the Indians, gave the ultimatum of the savages;
which was, that the emigrants should...

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...At last accounts terrified elders and bishops were decamping
to save their necks; and developments of...

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...To all
these were such statements freely and frequently made by the Indians.

"8. The testimony...

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...legislative action,
aimed at the correction of chronic mining evils in Storey County, must
entail upon me...

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...much fulfillment in so short a time, and
with such threats from a man who is...

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...Gold Hill
Assay Office that he desired to see me at the Yellow Jacket office.
Though such...

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...now, he's in my office,
and that will do as well--come on in, Winters wants to...

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...studious object of this "consultation" was no other than to compass
my killing, in the presence...

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...got you now, and by--before you can get out of this
room you've got to both...

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...to assume so important a
point, and then base important action upon your assumption. You...

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...made powerless in Mr. Winters' hands, and
that he did not mean to allow me that...

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...spread upon my knees.

Second.--I resolved to make no motion with my arms or hands which...

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...critical examination would
altogether disprove them.
...

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...claim the right to make ME come out and deny anything you may
choose to write...

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...the butt end of his weapon and
shaking it in my face, he warned me, if...

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...and wilfully murderous a look that I
shrink from writing it, yet as in all probability...

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...of facts to
appear in the Gold Hill News I feel it due to myself no...