Roughing It, Part 7.

By Mark Twain

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...ROUGHING IT

...

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...as much as five mile,
if we went so fur. An' he had the best...

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...about eight foot, the rock got so hard that we
had to put in a blast--the...

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...f'r a tree. Sagacity? It ain't no name for
it. 'Twas inspiration!"

I said,...

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...all through the surface dirt; in "pocket" diggings
it is concentrated in one little spot; in...

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...without liking him; and in a sudden and dire emergency I think
no friend of his...

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...way straight
in without an inquiry as to the rights or the merits of it, and...

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...women and children, and he
roared his "Shipmets a'hoy!" in a way that was calculated to...

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...it
himself. With his third retort his temper would begin to rise, and
within five minutes...

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...had been puzzling him uncomfortably:

"Now I understand it. I always thought I knew that...

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...and your conversations have shown you to be intimately
conversant with every detail of this national...

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...blame from the
Massachusetts ministers, in this matter, and transfer it to the South
Carolina clergymen where...

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...said to contain between twelve
and fifteen thousand inhabitants spread over a dead level; with streets
from...

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...were clothed in nothing but sunshine
--a very neat fitting and picturesque apparel indeed.

In place of...

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...at a slap. Then, observing an enemy
approaching,--a hairy tarantula on stilts--why not set the...

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...was
along with his "turn out," as he calls a top-buggy that Captain Cook
brought here in...

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...I simply argued the case with him. He resisted
argument, but ultimately yielded to insult...

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...anklet; sometimes
both feet were through, and I was handcuffed by the legs; and sometimes
my feet...

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...come and make them
permanently miserable by telling them how beautiful and how blissful a
place heaven...

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...with misery, and then
suffer death for trifling offences or yield up their lives on the
sacrificial...

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...skeletons have lain for ages just where their
proprietors fell in the great fight. Other...

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...reef! How calmly the dim city sleeps yonder in the plain!
How soft the shadows...

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...will take a genuine delight in doing it. This traits is
characteristic of horse jockeys,...

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... They were
in a little stable with a partition through the middle of it--one horse
in...

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...among the luxuriant grass in
your neighbor's broad front yard without a song at all--you do...

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...down in the
South Seas, with his face and neck tatooed till he looks like the
customary...

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...in a languid sort of
ecstasy. Many a different finger goes into the same bowl...

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...bodies, limbs and heads waved,
swayed, gesticulated, bowed, stooped, whirled, squirmed, twisted and
undulated as if they...

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...the third fourth is composed of common Kanakas and mercantile
foreigners and their families, and the...

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...the female in tracing
genealogies, but here the opposite is the case--the female line takes
precedence. ...

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...even weakened some of their
barbarian superstitions, much less destroyed them. I have just referred
to...

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...could not save him.

A luxury which they enjoy more than anything else, is a large...

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...troop
through the town, stark naked, with their robes folded under their arms,
march to the missionary...

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...with the poor little material of
slender territory and meagre population, play "empire." There is...

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...are fired when foreign vessels of war enter the port.

Next comes his Excellency the Minister...

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...the palace grounds
well crowded and had made the place a pandemonium every night with their
howlings...

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...officers of the kingdom, foreign Consuls,
Embassadors and distinguished guests...

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...one of them to the frame-work with.
Finally he entered his carriage and drove away, and...

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... common people that the bones of a cruel King could not be...

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...successor.
This information was derived from Liholiho, his son.

...

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...Liholiho and your foreigner; impart to us your
dying charge,...

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...'This is my
thought--we will eat him raw. [This sounds...

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... shall be the residence of King Liholiho?' They replied, 'Where,
...

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... Such were the laws on this subject.

...

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...nightmare.
They were not the salt of the earth, those "gentle children of the sun."

The natives...

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...in
it, perhaps, but not a long cat. The hold forward of the bulkhead had
but...

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...up and put my clothes on and went on deck.

The above is not overdrawn; it...

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...cocoa-palms and other
species of vegetation that grow only in the sultry atmosphere of eternal
Summer. ...

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...and although it ought to be taken off as soon as it tassels,
no doubt, it...

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...makes us famous, but at what a sorrowful sacrifice! I was so
sorry when I...

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...patiently enriching his mind with
information concerning turnips. The sentiment which he felt toward the
turnip...

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...rest and my mental vision seemed
clouded. The note was more connected, now, but did...

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...swine; tulips reduce posterity; causes
leather to resist. Our...

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...comprehend your kind note. It
cannot be possible, Sir,...

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... 'folly.' Your closing remark is as unkind as it was uncalled for;
...