Roughing It, Part 6.

By Mark Twain

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...ROUGHING IT

...

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...of the company. Mrs. F. was an able romancist
of the ineffable school--I know no...

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...it gives to its servant, he then
launched himself lovingly into his work: he married the...

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...mad. He led the heroes and heroines a
wilder dance than ever; and yet all...

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...an awkward situation; the voyage progressed, and
the vessel neared America.

But, by and by, two hundred...

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...date set. The weeks dragged on,
the time narrowed, orders were given to deck the...

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...the idea of a resurrection from its dead
ashes in a new and undreamed of condition...

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...speak the word!"

Said Dollinger the pilot man,
Tow'ring above the crew,
"Fear not, but trust in Dollinger,
And...

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...wheat,
A box of books, a cow,
A violin, Lord Byron's works,
A rip-saw and a sow.

A curve!...

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...the amount of gold mixed with the silver), and the
freight on it (when the shipment...

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...a spot"--$1,000 a
day each, and $30,000,000 a year in the aggregate.--Enterprise.
[A considerable over estimate--M. ...

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... The Gould and Curry is
only one single mine under there, among a great many...

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...the
silver bars, you can go back and find it again in my Esmeralda chapters
if so...

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...the Ophir. From
a side-drift we crawled through a...

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...do not mind it, however.

Returning along the fifth gallery,...

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... hauling of ore will cease to be burdensome. This vast work...

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...a
hiccup to mar his voice, not a cloud upon his brain thick enough to
obscure his...

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...every which way, while t' other one was looking
as straight ahead as a spy-glass.

'Grown people...

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...favorable turn
and got well. The next time Robbins got sick, Jacops tried to make...

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...tell
me it was an accident that he was biled. There ain't no such a...

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...he reached
a certain stage of intoxication, no human power could keep him from
setting out, with...

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...removed from the rest of the town. The chief
employment of Chinamen in towns is...

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...cemetery; it is ridged and wringled from its
centre to its circumference with graves--and inasmuch as...

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...duly appointed quack (no decent doctor
would defile himself with such legalized robbery) ten dollars for...

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...in the stem would well-nigh turn the stomach of a statue.
...

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...might ever hope to succeed
in telling "t'other from which;" the manner of drawing is similar...

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...and the irresponsible among
the population into adopting the constitution and thus well-nigh killing
the country (it...

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...chief editor. It destroyed
me. The first day, I wrote my "leader" in the...

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...that to produce two sermons a week is wearing,
in the long run. In truth...

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...and he had promised that he
would either secure Marshall or somebody else for them by...

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...drink for twelve hours, and hadn't a
cent to my name. I was most perishing--and...

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...('ic!) where people's liable to stumble over him
when they ain't noticin'!"

It was not without regret...

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... For a whole hour the
weird visitor winked and burned in its lofty solitude, and...

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...one
walks over a soundless carpet of beaten yellow bark and dead spines of
the foliage till...

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...old-fashioned, many streets are made up of
decaying, smoke-grimed, wooden houses, and the barren sand-hills toward
the...

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...the prisoned lightnings
would cleave the dull firmament asunder and light it with a blinding
glare for...

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...and twenty in the shade there all the time--except when it varies
and goes higher. ...

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...will find
it hard to believe that there stood at one time a fiercely-flourishing
little city, of...

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...new surprise, the grave world smiles as
usual, and says "Well, that is California all over."

But...

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...old at the time. Her father said that, after landing
from the ship, they were...

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...sumptuous evening
dress, simpered and aired my graces like a born beau, and polkad and
schottisched with...

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...friend or two that night, as they would sail for
the east in the morning. ...

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...distributed in small fragments along three hundred yards of
street.

One could have fancied that somebody had...

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... One man who had suffered considerably and growled
accordingly, was standing at the window when...

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...of this kind. Suspended
pictures were thrown down, but oftener still, by a curious freak...

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... they desired before making public their whereabouts. Ores from
...

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...amuse himself with such an expensive
luxury without much caring about the cost of it. ...

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...we would have a long,
luxurious talk about everything and everybody, and he would furnish me...

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...him that for convenience--was a splendid
creature. He was full of hope, pluck and philosophy;...

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...plate of beans and a piece of bread for ten cents; or a
fish-ball and some...

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...my eyes and see if I lie! Give
me the least trifle in the world...

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...and they had seen it sicken and die, and
pass away like a dream. With...

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...And the next day he bought his groceries on credit as usual,
and shouldered his pan...

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... All the summer they root around the
bushes, and turn up a thousand little piles...