Roughing It, Part 5.

By Mark Twain

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...ROUGHING IT

...

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...as my late grandfather had had a coachman and such things, but
no liveries, I felt...

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...mere nine-mile
jaunt without baggage.

As I "raised the hill" overlooking the town, it lacked fifteen minutes...

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...staid and
steadfast Higbie had left an important matter to chance or failed to be
true to...

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...he arrived there about five or ten minutes too late!
The "notice" was already up, the...

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...difference
between six hundred men owning a house and five thousand owning it. We
would have...

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...furlough and forgot to
put a limit to it. I had clerked in a drug...

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...of myself and
shoot rubbish at it with a long-handled shovel.

I sat down, in the cabin,...

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...but had worn the thing in deference to popular sentiment, and in
order that I might...

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...nonpareil columns had to be filled, and I was
getting along. Presently, when things began...

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...commendation. With encouragement like that, I felt that I could
take my pen and murder...

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...report and
returned to our office. It was a short document and soon copied.
Meantime Boggs...

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...get the start
of him, and then swung out over the shaft. I reached the...

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... The "flush times" were in magnificent flower! Large fire-proof
brick buildings were going up...

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...healing to gunshot wounds, and therefore,
to simply shoot your adversary through both lungs was a...

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...piles of rich rock every
day, and every man believed that his little wild cat claim...

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...the rock "resembled the Comstock" (and so it did--but as a
general thing the resemblance was...

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...a friend, you naturally invite him to take a
few. That describes the condition of...

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...a wild spirit possessed the mining brain of the community,
I will remark that "claims" were...

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...silver in small, solid lumps. I went to the
place with the owners, and found...

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...was finished and ready for occupation--a stately
fireproof brick. Every day from five all the...

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...their strugglings could not open.
The very Chinamen and Indians caught the excitement and dashed their...

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...went down; and when the crowd dispersed he had sold the sack
to three hundred different...

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...thousand dollars,
coin!"

A tempest of applause followed. A telegram carried the news to Virginia,
and fifteen...

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...helping on the
enthusiasm by displaying the portly silver bricks which Nevada's donation
had produced, he had...

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...ranks of life, and miraculously ignorant.
He drove a team, and owned a small ranch--a ranch...

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...market value in
hay and barley in seventeen days by the watch. And he said...

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...telegraph operator who had been discharged by the company for
divulging the secrets of the office,...

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...of the time and the country.

I was personally acquainted with the majority of the nabobs...

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...cordially. He said:

"You twig me, old pard! All right between gents. Smell...

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...up, holding on to the cleats
overhead. Parties with baskets and bundles were climbing up...

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...but with
intelligence unblinded by its sorrow, brought in a verdict of death "by
the visitation of...

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...dropped in of his own accord to help the man who
was getting the worst of...

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...you restricted yourself to categorical statements
of fact unencumbered with obstructing accumulations of metaphor and
allegory?"

Another pause,...

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...glass eye! Just spit in his face and give him room according
to his strength,...

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...to what a man's rights
was--and so, when some roughs jumped the Catholic bone-yard and started
in...

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...was the bulliest man in the
mountains, pard! He could run faster, jump higher, hit...

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...memory of the friend
that was gone; for, as Scotty had once said, it was "his...

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...and be looked up to by the community at
large, was to stand behind a bar,...

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...remember one of those sorrowful farces, in Virginia, which we call a
jury trial. A...

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...safer in his hands than in theirs.
Why could not the jury law be so altered...

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...Joe McGee, Jack Harris,
Six-fingered Pete, etc., etc. There was a long list of them....

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...he
could lift a keg of nails with his teeth. He picked up a common...

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...back to me; remarked to me that he thought
he...

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... Williams and Andy Blessington invited him down stairs to take...

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... When there has been a long season of
quiet,...

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...fatal. But being considerably under the influence of liquor,
...

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... persons on the street in the vicinity, and a number...

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... shot fired. After being shot, Reeder said when he got on his...

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...of the room, then, and not go near the
door, or the window by the stove....

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...found that the staple of conversation was the exploits of one
Bill Noakes, a bully, the...

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...things ahead of
you good. I'm going to march in on Noakes--and take him--and jug...

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...then you ain't satisfied
when you get it. Before or after's all one--you know how...

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...vote right, do you hear?--or
else there'll be a double-barreled inquest here when this trial's off,
and...

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...a
population then that "inflicted" justice after a fashion that was
simplicity and primitiveness itself, and could...