Roughing It, Part 4.

By Mark Twain

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...ROUGHING IT

...

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... That's what I want to know. I want to
know wha--what you ('ic) what...

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...of danger. The consequence was that Arkansas
shortly began to glower upon him dangerously, and...

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...won't stand that. Come out from behind that bar
till I clean you! You...

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...inn had become next to
insupportable by reason of the dirt, drunkenness, fighting, etc., and so
we...

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...of the true line his instinct would
assail him like an outraged conscience. Consequently we...

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...He no doubt got bewildered and
lost, and Fatigue delivered him over to Sleep and Sleep...

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...the
drowsing activities in our minds and bodies. We were alive and awake at
once--and shaking...

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...horses
were gone! I had been appointed to hold the bridles, but in my absorbing
anxiety...

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...bent
gradually down and every heart went with him--everybody, too, for that
matter--and blood and breath stood...

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...ended by
saying that his reform should begin at this moment, even here in the
presence of...

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...voice said, with bitterness:

"Will some gentleman be so good as to kick me behind?"

It was...

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...I would feel if my braver, stronger, truer
comrades should catch me in my degradation. ...

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...parts, and he very much wanted an opportunity to manifest it--partly
for the pure gratification of...

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...high
and busting into ten million pieces, cattle turned inside out and
a-coming head on with their...

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...his arms full of law-books, and
on his ears fell an order from the judge which...

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...Gentlemen, it ill becomes
us, worms as we are, to meddle with the decrees of Heaven....

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...Capt. John Nye, the Governor's brother. He had
a good memory, and a tongue hung...

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...we had a trout
supper, an exceedingly sociable time after it, good beds to sleep in,...

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...on them and then waiting for a buyer--who never came. We
never found any ore...

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...shaken in a fine shower into the pans, also,
about every half hour, through a buckskin...

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...the various mills, and this
included changes in style of pans and other machinery, and a...

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...again, the scales will take
marked notice of the addition.

Then a little lead (also weighed) is...

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...order to show that they meant fairly. Then they broke
a little fragment off a...

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...the provisions of the
miners ran out, and they would have to go back home. ...

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...that gentleman--for when I had my one accidental
glimpse of Mr. W. in Esmeralda he had...

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...but was not perfect. He
put on the pack saddle (a thing like a saw-buck),...

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...with a price on my head. Then the miners appeared to sit down on
a...

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...take
upon themselves the discomforts of such a trip. On the morning of our
second day,...

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...got to the shore there
was no bark to him--for he had barked the bark all...

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...go, they pop up to the surface as dry as a patent office report, and
walk...

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...single
month in the year, in the little town of Mono. So uncertain is the
climate...

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... The island was a long, moderately
high hill of ashes--nothing but gray ashes and pumice-stone,...

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...hope for us. It was driving gradually
shoreward all the time, now; but whether it...

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...my comrade was, his great
exertions began to tell on him, and he was anxious that...

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...be safe and yet convenient to hand
when wanted. A neighbor of ours hid six...

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..."district" looks about alike, an
old resident of the camp can take a glance at a...

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...own operatives permission
to enter the mine at any time or for any purpose. I...

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...with a will. For I was worth
a million dollars, and did not care "whether...

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...suppose that we slept, that night.
Higbie and I went to bed at midnight, but it...

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...I said I would like to see myself selling for any such
price. My ideas...