Roughing It, Part 3.

By Mark Twain

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...ROUGHING IT

...

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...out of companionship
and consciousness of earthly things.

We arrived, disembarked, and the stage went on. ...

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...and
thither, going and coming, appearing and disappearing among the rolling
billows of dust--hats, chickens and parasols...

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...They were boarding around
privately, and had their offices in their bedrooms.

The Secretary and I took...

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...scuffle for little territorial crumbs and offices they could not make
their condition more precarious than...

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...said Mrs.
O'Flannigan would hold him for the Brigade's board anyhow, and he
intended to get what...

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...and then you could hear a little subdued scramble and a
sorrowful "O Lord!" and then...

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...woolen shirt, and pants crammed into boot-tops, and gloried in
the absence of coat, vest and...

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...must surely be the
fairest picture the whole earth affords.

We found the small skiff belonging to...

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...on Lake Tahoe would restore an Egyptian mummy
to his pristine vigor, and give him an...

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...to build a substantial
log-house and excite the envy of the Brigade boys; but by the...

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...not look always, but must close sometimes in sleep.

We slept in the sand close to...

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...feet below the
surface. Down through the transparency of these great depths, the water
was not...

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...at this, I heard a shout from Johnny,
and looking up I saw that my fire...

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...sleep. The next morning we started back to the old camp, but while
out a...

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...at twenty-two!--horse, saddle and bridle at twenty-two dollars,
gentlemen!" and I could hardly resist.

A man whom...

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...clasping his lean neck desperately,
slid back into the saddle and held on. He came...

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...a Chinaman, cast anchor in front of the "ranch."

Such panting and blowing! Such spreading...

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...tried to trade him off at private vendue
next, offering him at a sacrifice for second-hand...

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...few orthodox Americans straggled in from California,
but no love was lost between the two classes...

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...a foreign intruder, but a poor one. It was not even worth plucking
--except by...

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...three dollars and forty cents would be subtracted from
the Secretary's eighteen hundred dollar salary--and it...

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...if I had been Secretary
myself). But the United States never applauded this devotion. ...

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...very capable
pickpocket if I had remained in the public service a year or two.

That was...

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...Johnson's
wake last spring. The "Last Chance" had found a "clay casing" and knew
they were...

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...the richest mineral region upon God's footstool.
Each mountain range...

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...better
comprehend certain items in the above. At this time, our near neighbor,
Gold Hill, was...

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...the ore has been converted into current metal. I do
...

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... hard usage. He alights before his adobe dwelling, hastily
...

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...also.
It was at this time that I resigned the position of driver, and never
resumed it...

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...he never gave himself any
airs, privileges, or exemptions on that account. He did a...

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...the very summit and culmination of earthly luxury.

It is a kind of life that has...

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...and most invigorating exercises one can
contrive is to run and jump across the Humboldt river...

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...seizing and examining bits of stone, blowing
the dust from them or rubbing them on my...

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...amuse me. It grew to be rare fun to hear
them planning their poor little...

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...said I, "I don't say anything--I haven't been around, you
know, and of course don't know...

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...was the sort of rock that contained silver.
Contained it! I had thought that at...

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...perfectly distinct from the casing rock on each side
of it; and that it kept to...

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...the fuse and
run. When the explosion came and the rocks and smoke shot into...

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...them; the floor of his cabin was
littered with them; they were disposed in labeled rows...

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...Humboldt world had gone crazy.
On the authority of such assays its newspaper correspondents were
frothing about...

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...the house
was well crowded.

We walked out, after supper, and visited a small Indian camp in...

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...realized that this flood
was not a mere holiday spectacle, but meant damage--and not only to...