Roughing It, Part 2.

By Mark Twain

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...ROUGHING IT

...

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... tried by judge and jury. This was the nearest approach to social
...

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... his arrest, he had given a fearful beating to one of...

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... companions had made the town a perfect hell. In...

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...into, and buying a bottle of
wine, he tried to...

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...the judge stood perfectly quiet, and offered no
resistance to...

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...if the whole body of the miners were of the
...

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...of rough and rocky ground that intervened between her and the
...

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...as to be inaudible, save to a few in his immediate
...

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...called cowards by unreflecting people), and when
we read of Slade that he "had so exhausted...

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...we
woke up to the fact that our journey had stretched a long way across the
world...

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...would be a
frightful loss to the community.

Two miles beyond South Pass City we saw for...

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...one or two majestic purple
domes projected above our level on either hand and gave us...

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...and by
would join the broad Missouri and flow through unknown plains and deserts
and unvisited wildernesses;...

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...to
make us forget all things but pleasant ones, and we parted again with
sincere "good-bye" and...

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...and what chances we had been taking.
He traced our wheel-tracks to the imminent verge of...

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...when I say a
thing I mean it.

However, time presses. At four in the afternoon...

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...shops and stores; and there was fascination
in surreptitiously staring at every creature we took to...

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...trim
dwellings, built of "frame" and sunburned brick--a great thriving orchard
and garden behind every one of...

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...visit the famous inland sea, the American "Dead Sea," the
great Salt Lake--seventeen miles, horseback, from...

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...I presume? Boy, or girl?"




CHAPTER XIV.

Mr. Street was very busy with his telegraphic matters--and...

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...fry cannot do you any
good.' I did not think much of the idea, for...

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...no time to make the customary inquisition into the workings of
polygamy and get up the...

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...the kitchen, as like as not. And how this
dreadful sort of thing, this hiving...

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...giving a breast-pin to
No. 6, and she, for one, did not propose to let this...

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...see the end of it. And these creatures will compare these pins
together, and if...

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...gives a whistle to a
child of mine and I get my hands on him, I...

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...I can, I still can't get ahead as
fast as I feel I ought to, with...

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...stone, in an out-of-the-way locality, the work of
translating was equally a miracle, for the same...

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...Heaven.

"Hid up" is good. And so is "wherefore"--though why "wherefore"? Any
other word would...

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...blood of all men, and be found spotless before the judgment-seat of
...

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...a surety that the said Smith
has got the plates...

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...one of their number, a
party by the name of Nephi. They finally reached the...

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...took the
compass, and it did work whither I desired...

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...(from Chapter IX. of the Book of Nephi) appears to
contain information not familiar to everybody:

...

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... and they came down and encircled those little ones about,...

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...land, who had not been slain, save
it was Ether....

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...of their people.

8. And it came to pass...

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... And it came to pass that they fought for the space
...

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...of our two days' sojourn, we left Great Salt Lake City hearty
and well fed and...

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...of any commodity than twenty-five cents'
worth. We had always been used to half dimes...

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...cramped and
shriveled up so!

What a roar of vulgar laughter there was! I destroyed the...

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...had still to do.

And it was comfort in those succeeding days to sit up and...

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...would
write home all about it.

This enthusiasm, this stern thirst for adventure, wilted under the sultry
August...

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...least we kept it up ten hours,
which, I take it, is a day, and a...

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...XIX.

On the morning of the sixteenth day out from St. Joseph we arrived at the
entrance...

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...repulsive wastes that our country or any other can
exhibit.

The Bushmen and our Goshoots are manifestly...

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...Bennett's works and
studying frontier life at the Bowery Theatre a couple of weeks--I say
that the...

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...a bone at every step! The desert was one
prodigious graveyard. And the log-chains,...

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...at the cross roads, and
he told us a good deal about the country and the...

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...your seat, Horace, and I'll get you there on
time!'--and you bet you he did, too,...

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...languid consciousness. Then we fed him a
little, and by and by he seemed to...

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...grasshoppers--everything that has a fragrance to
it through all the long list of things that are...