Roughing It, Part 1.

By Mark Twain

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...ROUGHING IT

...

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... ...

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...Delivered Properly--Sleeping Under
Difficulties--A Jackass Rabbit Meditating, and on Business--A Modern
Gulliver--Sage-brush--Overcoats as an Article of Diet--Sad...

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...O'Flannigan--Shadow Secrets--Cause for a
Disturbance at Once--The Irish Brigade--Mrs. O'Flannigan's Boarders--The
Surveying Expedition--Escape of the Tarantulas

CHAPTER XXII.
The...

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...of Soap
Suds--Geological Curiosities--A Week On the Sierras--A Narrow Escape From
a Funny Explosion--"Stove Heap Gone"

CHAPTER XL.
The...

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...Editor--Almost Receive an Offer--An Accident--Three Drunken Anecdotes
--Last Look at Mt. Davidson--A Beautiful Incident

CHAPTER LVI.
Off for...

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...brother had just been appointed Secretary of Nevada Territory--an
office of such majesty that it concentrated...

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...than that. I meant to see all I could that was new and
strange, and...

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...patent-leather boots, nor anything else necessary
to make life calm and peaceful. We were reduced...

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...off
at once, and then there was no safe place in all the region round about,
but...

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...the driver said--"a
little for Brigham, and Carson, and 'Frisco, but the heft of it for...

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...under a desolating deluge
of trivial gossip that left not a crag or pinnacle of rejoinder
projecting...

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...I shall not
air my ignorance in this crowd, anyway."

Just then the conductor's face appeared at...

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...our perfect enjoyment took the form of a
tranquil and contented ecstasy. The stage whirled...

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...ever were mounted on any creature but a
jackass.

When he is sitting quiet, thinking about his...

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...under a sage-bush, and entertained
myself with fancying that the gnats among its foliage were liliputian
birds,...

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...it is a distinguished
failure. Nothing can abide the taste of it but the jackass...

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...and found that the sensitive creature had
choked to death on one of the mildest and...

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...banks
on each side, and every time we flew down one bank and scrambled up the
other,...

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...facetious and flattering accostings, and obsequious tenders of
service, from five or six hairy and half-civilized...

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...made of sundried, mud-colored
bricks, laid up without mortar (adobes, the Spaniards call these bricks,
and Americans...

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...would
order some sample coffins.

It had come down from Esau and Samson, and had been accumulating...

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...to eat it, for it was condemned army bacon which the
United States would not feed...

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...it was, in
fact, but it is gone from my memory, apparently. However, it is...

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...experience
what it is to eat in one of Pullman's hotels...

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... the men singers and of the women singers blending sweetly in the
...

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...him, and even the fleas would desert him for a velocipede. He is
so spiritless...

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...perceptibly closer; and he begins to get aggravated, and it makes him
madder and madder to...

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...eat anything in the world that his first cousins, the
desert-frequenting tribes of Indians will, and...

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...they placed an agent or superintendent,
and invested him with great authority. His beat or...

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...and so, but for the grandeur of his position his would have
been a sorry life,...

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...a navy
six-shooter, and so he always went "fixed" to make things go along
smoothly.

Now and then...

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...Also in our party was an elderly pilgrim who was the reverse of
...

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... wonderful thing to do, Jack! Think of it!"

...

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...about five hundred and fifty miles
from St. Joseph, our mud-wagon broke down. We were...

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...over his back, and bellowing every now and
then, and thinking he had got a fifteen-hundred...

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...forty feet to the ground from where I
sat. I cautiously unwound the lariat from...

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...to say, 'You are my meat, friend.'
Up again--higher and higher, and getting more excited the...

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...after, and of course he shuts up his shell. Anybody
might know he would. ...

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...chopped up some pieces. Bascom smuggled a
wink to me, and proffered a slice of...

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...wafer of a racing-saddle, and no visible blanket.
He wore light shoes, or none at all....

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...alkali water
in the road, and we cordially hailed it as a first-class curiosity, and a
thing...

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...coming across arrow-heads in his
system for nearly seven years after the massacre; and another of...

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...through its front--a reminiscence of
its last trip through this region. The bullet that made...

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...startled by a ringing report, and cloven by such a long, wild,
agonizing shriek! Then...

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...but had a price on his head and didn't
dare show himself in the settlements," the...

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...and the most valuable citizen that
inhabited the savage fastnesses of the mountains.




CHAPTER X.

Really and truly,...

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...three, others say four,
and others six--but the world was the richer for their loss. ...

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...he should help the gentleman bury his game
--otherwise his churlishness would surely be remembered against...

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...navy revolver. The legends say
that one morning at Rocky Ridge, when he was feeling...

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...lynch him.
They disarmed him, and shut him up in a strong log-house, and placed a
guard...

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...elbow. Never youth stared and shivered as I did
when I heard them call him...