Roughing It

By Mark Twain

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...ROUGHING IT

...

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... MARK...

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...Dignitary--Strange Place for a Frontyard
--Accommodations--Double Portraits--An Heirloom--Our Worthy Landlord
--“Fixings and Things”--An Exile--Slumgullion--A Well Furnished Table--The
Landlord...

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...Land
--Securing a Title--Outhouse and Fences

CHAPTER XXIII.
A Happy Life--Lake Tahoe and its Moods--Transparency of the Waters--A
Catastrophe--Fire!...

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...Future

CHAPTER XLI.
A Rheumatic Patient--Day Dreams--An Unfortunate Stumble--I Leave
Suddenly--Another Patient--Higbie in the Cabin--Our Balloon Bursted
--Worth Nothing--Regrets...

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...if it ain’t a Child!”--One
Hundred and Fifty Dollars for a Kiss--Waiting for a turn

CHAPTER LVIII.
Life...

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...Governor’s absence. A salary of eighteen hundred dollars
a year and the title of “Mr....

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...of that three-month pleasure excursion for six or seven
uncommonly long years!

I dreamed all night about...

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...woolen army shirt and
“stogy” boots included; and into the valise we crowded a few white
shirts,...

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...mountains. In the matter of luxuries we were modest--we took none
along but some pipes...

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...as he just then got up a fearful convulsion of his countenance
which was suggestive of...

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... She went on, hour after hour, till
I was sorry I ever opened the mosquito...

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...mail matter. He said:
“Gents, you’ll have to turn out a spell. Thoroughbrace is...

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...most
exhilarating way; the cradle swayed and swung luxuriously, the pattering
of the horses’ hoofs, the cracking...

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...but the breaking of a twig will scare him nearly to death,
and then he tilts...

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...herds, and myself some vast loafer from Brobdignag
waiting to catch a little citizen and eat...

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...nutritiousness
is worth nothing, for they will eat pine knots, or anthracite coal, or
brass filings, or...

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...was about to say, when diverted from my subject, that occasionally one
finds sage-bushes five or...

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...be down
in a pile at the forward end of the stage, nearly in a sitting...

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...fresh
team out of the stables--for in the eyes of the stage-driver of that day,
station-keepers and...

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...to
them worth speaking of, were thatched and then sodded or covered with a
thick layer of...

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...room
stood three or four rifles and muskets, together with horns and pouches
of ammunition. The...

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...it cheap for the sustenance of their passengers and
employees. We may have found this...

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...the landmark
in my memory which tells me where I first encountered the vigorous new
vernacular of...

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...next forward of our sleeping palace, we found ourselves
in the...

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...Polyphemus
eye, lighting up long vistas of prairie, rushed into the...

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...the rest of his face is apologizing for it. And he
is so homely!--so scrawny,...

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...or ceases to smile; and he grows still more and more
incensed to see how shamefully...

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...fact that these latter are the only
creatures known to history who will eat nitro-glycerine and...

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...purchased horses,
mules harness, and food for men and beasts, and distributed these things
among his stage...

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...We took a new
driver every day or every night (for they drove backward and forward...

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...head to teach him some simple matter that he could have
taught him with a club...

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...the Scriptures and an enthusiast
concerning them. He was...

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... Ben Holliday would
have fetched them through in thirty-six...

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...horses, by invitation, and joined a
party who were just starting on a buffalo hunt. ...

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...out on his neck--the horse’s, not
the bull’s--and then underneath, and next on his rump, and...

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...your saddle up in the tree with you?”

“Take it up in the tree with me?...

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...I took a long breath,--and then said I,
‘It is now or never.’ I had...

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...than
that. Let him shape the conversation to suit himself--let him drop it or
change it...

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...and asked for more!

We rode our two miles in silence, and wide apart. At...

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...each hold about the bulk of a
child’s primer. They held many and many an...

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...at home.
This water gave the road a soapy appearance, and in many places the
ground looked...

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...arrows that after the
Indians were gone and he could raise up and examine himself, he...

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...much. He said the place to keep
a man “huffy” was down on the Southern...

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...[It was our driver’s voice.]

“Kill him! Kill him like a dog!”

“I’m being murdered! ...

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...to have “drove up there with
his pistol cocked and ready on the seat alongside of...

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...about this man Slade, ever since the day before we reached
Julesburg. In order that...

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...who bore the
reputation of being a reckless and desperate man himself. Jules hated
Slade for...

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...a neighborly turn in
interring him.

Slade took up his residence sweetly and peacefully in the midst...

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...days before--observe the fine
memory he had for matters like that--and, “Gentlemen,” said Slade,
drawing, “it is...

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...for his wife, so
that he might have a last interview with her. She was...

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...it!--looking upon it
--touching it--hobnobbing with it, as it were! Here, right by my side,...

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...had removed from Rocky Ridge) had hanged him. I find an
account of the affair...

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...Judge Alex. Davis, by authority of a presented
Derringer, and...

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...if he
had money; but there were not a few...

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... retention; but being at least as prudent as he was valiant, he
...

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...long look, with his dark
and piercing eyes, at the...

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...unanimity on the subject, all along
the gulch.

...

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...into Wallace street and marched
up at quick time. ...

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... surrounded by a guard, composing the best armed and most numerous
...

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... the citizens joined the ranks of the guard when the arrest...

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...creature, that it was not
moral courage that enabled him to do it. Then, if...

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...was August, now,
and sweltering weather in the daytime, yet at one of the stations the...

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...I was
full as much amazed as if I never had heard of snow in August...

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...the
spectator’s head, swinging their tatters so nearly in his face that his
impulse was to shrink...

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...sea, never to look upon its
snow-peaks again or regret them.

I freighted a leaf with a...

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...for desolation and utter
solitude. On damp, murky nights, these scattered skeletons gave forth a
soft,...

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...and Great Salt Lake City, and the only one we were ever really
thankful for.

Think of...

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...dark and bloody deeds they had done, and when I entered this one’s
house I had...

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...them. “Gentiles” are
people who are not Mormons. Our fellow-passenger, Bemis, took care of
himself,...

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...too figurative for the author of this book. But the Mormon crest
was easy. ...

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...“Lion House,” and I do not know or
remember how many more church and government buildings...

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...the
ground in person--pen and ink descriptions cannot convey the dreary
reality to the reader. And...

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...strong interest all the way through. He examined all the
papers in detail, and whenever...

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...censure--and the man that marries sixty of them has done a deed of
open-handed generosity so...

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...the henery--or the Lion House, as it is strangely named. Along
with each wife were...

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...knew
her rights.” He gave his promise, and she went. And presently three
Mrs. Youngs...

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...an
exactly similar gift to all my children--and knowing by experience the
importance of the thing, I...

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...child was mine and
she my wife--that I had married her at such-and-such a time in
such-and-such...

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...their breath at once, and you could
actually see the walls of the house suck in--and...

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...satisfactory again. “And it came to
pass” was his pet. If he had left...

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...of
Jared, who came from the tower of which hath...

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... ...

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... ...

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...a bit of genuine nature cropped out, and is revealed by
outspoken Nephi with Scriptural frankness--they...

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...of the book of Jacob:

For behold, thus saith the...

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... was Jonas, and also Mathoni, and Mathonihah, his brother, and Kumen,
...

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...Book of Ether is an incomprehensible medley of if “history,” much of
it relating to battles...

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...and that they might receive all the strength which it
...

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...be destroyed; wherefore they went again
to battle. And...

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... overtake them; and they fought again with the sword. And it...

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...the Mormons were almost if not wholly and
completely responsible for that most treacherous and pitiless...

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...doing anything of the
kind.

But people easily get reconciled to big money and big prices, and...

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...plains and Utah
respected and admired--but we were wretchedly ashamed of being
“emigrants,” and sorry enough that...

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... At four P.M. we had doubled our distance and
were ninety or a hundred...

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...and the shore still as far
away as ever, apparently; imagine team, driver, coach and passengers...

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...cut
through our lips, it persecuted our eyes, it ate through the delicate
membranes and made our...

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...Indeed, I
have been obliged to look the bulky volumes of Wood’s “Uncivilized Races
of Men” clear...

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...two and mortally wounded the driver. The latter was
full of pluck, and so was...

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...impression abroad that the Baltimore and Washington Railroad
Company and many of its employees are Goshoots;...

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...whatever.

There are several rivers in Nevada, and they all have this mysterious
fate. They end...

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...Horace’s coat, and finally shot his head clean through
the roof of the stage, and then...

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... His words so wrought upon us that it was a
relief to us all when...

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...entirely familiar with
it. In this connection I can tell you a most laughable thing...

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...that it is in the Talmud. I have seen it in print in nine
different...

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...masters were the only life we saw.
Otherwise we moved in the midst of solitude, silence...

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...horse’s sides and made the animal
look quite picturesque. I never saw Harris shoot a...

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...up a mile or two to leeward
of the point he is aiming at. And...

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...queen’s-ware washbowl. Consequently we
were hated without reserve by the other tenants of the O’Flannigan
“ranch.”...

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...but very jolly. They
brought in great store of prodigious hairy spiders--tarantulas--and
imprisoned them in covered...

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...trunks and beds, for not a
thing could be seen. Then came occasional little interruptions...

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...candles and
hunted the place high and low for them, but with no success. Did...

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...who had beguiled us. Thus refreshed, we presently
resumed the march with renewed vigor and...

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...shore.

It is always very cold on that lake shore in the night, but we had...

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...was necessary to
cut down trees here and there and make them fall in such a...

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...pines, and
now and then the far-off thunder of an avalanche. The forest about us
was...

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...floating in the air! Yes, where it was even eighty feet deep.
Every little pebble...

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...it was built to hold the ground, and that was enough. We
did not wish...

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...We never thought
of supper, and never felt fatigue. But at eleven o’clock the
conflagration had...

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...The next minute they were only a sailing
puff of dust on the far desert. ...

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...the plaza, and certain
citizens held him by the head, and others by the tail, while...

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...genuine d--d Mexican plug, and an uncommon mean one at that,
too. Why, you turnip,...

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...he miscalculated a little, and did not get
his rider through intact, but he always got...

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...day I gave the Genuine
Mexican Plug to a passing Arkansas emigrant whom fortune delivered into
my...

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...by day.

The people were glad to have a legitimately constituted government, but
did not particularly enjoy...

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...pine benches and chairs for the legislature, and
covered the floors with clean saw-dust by way...

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... In the days I
speak of he never could be made to comprehend why it...

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...too much accustomed to employing dollar-and-a-half
thieves in all manner of official capacities to regard his...

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...had not
experienced an astonishing advance in value within a short time.
Everybody was talking about these...

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...Humboldt. That the reader may
see what moved me, and what would as surely have...

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... My pyrhanism vanished upon his
statement that in the...

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...mountain
machinery. The proprietors have combined the capital and...

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...Its richness is indexed by its market
valuation. The...

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...December afternoon. The horses were so weak and old
that we soon found that it...

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... Parties who met us, occasionally,
advised us to put the horses in the wagon, but...

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...The old
gentleman complained mildly about these familiarities, at last, and when
he got through with his...

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...of fresh water, convenient, and then,
with nothing to mar our enjoyment, and no stragglers to...

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...gather up, in a day or two, or at furthest a week or two, silver
enough...

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...wealth. As I walked
along I could not help smiling at the thought of my...

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...Is there some mystery
behind all this?”

“Never mind. I am not saying anything. You...

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...the beginnings of tunnels, and the purpose was to drive
them hundreds of feet into the...

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...angles, variations and sinuosities, together with fifty
feet of ground...

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...the hole progressed very well. But the
rock became more compact, presently, and gads and...

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...were stark mad with
excitement--drunk with happiness--smothered under mountains of
prospective wealth--arrogantly compassionate toward the plodding millions
who...

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...don’t want you to
believe me--look at the assay!”

Then he would get out a greasy sheet...

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...through a snow-storm for two or three days,
and arrived at “Honey Lake Smith’s,” a sort...

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...had once been, in other times, was already filling, and in one or two
places the...

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...that curious crew.
Swearing, drinking and card playing were the order of the day, and
occasionally a...

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...here bullyin’ around, and cussin’ and goin’ on
like a lunatic--don’t you do it. ‘Coz...

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...nothing but that?”

“No--nothing.”

Then an uncomfortable silence.

Arkansas played with his glass a moment, lolling on his...

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...of trouble!”

“Please, Arkansas, please don’t shoot! If there’s got to be bloodshed--”

“Do you hear...

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...bow,
with a paddle, Ballou paddled in the middle, and I sat in the stern
holding the...

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...as a compass, boys! Here we are, right in
somebody’s tracks that will hunt the...

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...no longer, now, but took up our march in its wake, and trotted
merrily along, for...

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...four or five feet above it, it certainly
could not with one’s nose nearly against it.




CHAPTER...

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...two yards of the creatures and never see them. We gave them
up without an...

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... It was a solemn sort of silence;
even the wind put on a stealthy, sinister...

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...live to continue, by throwing away the ancient pack of cards that had
solaced our captivity...

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...shed stood our still
saddled and bridled horses!

An arched snow-drift broke up, now, and Ollendorff emerged...

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...side of the barn would be somewhat safer, and so
I turned the corner. As...

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...keeps out of the way--when it
gets in the way they snub it. Sometimes this...

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...and lit out’n the county in
three jumps exactly.

“But what grinds me is that that Morgan...

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...Three fourths of them were
called by the defendant Morgan, but no matter, their testimony invariably
went...

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...defendant Morgan in this
marked and wonderful manner; and if Heaven, dissatisfied with the
position of the...

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...powers, he had one or two
other endowments of a marked character. One was a...

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...but in a little more
forward state. The claims we had been paying assessments on...

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...lived in a little cabin and cooked for ourselves; and
altogether it was a hard life,...

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...these tiresome things we had to attend to constantly. Streams of
dirty water flowed always...

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...with a long-handled shovel, is the most
undesirable.

At the end of the week the machinery was...

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...metals oxydize and are absorbed with the lead into the pores of the
cupel. A...

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...in silver and $366.36 in gold!

Due publication of the whole matter was made in the...

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...individual would be trying to be
very secret, but yet venturing to whisper to just one...

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...cement as large as my fist which was said to have
been given to Whiteman by...

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...the horse’s sides sunk in and he gasped for breath--but
every time the lashings grew tight...

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...stone whizzed by my head. I flattened myself out in the dust like a
postage...

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... We
hired a large boat and two shot-guns from a lonely ranchman who lived
some ten...

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...and pawed the earth and clawed the air, and
threw double somersaults, sometimes backward and...

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...and their part and proper place in Nature’s economy: the ducks eat
the flies--the flies eat...

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...a Fourth of July
procession it generally snows on them, and they do say that as...

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...a shallow, far-reaching basin, carpeted
with ashes, and here and there a patch of fine sand....

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... When, a little later, it dragged slowly along
and seemed about to go by, only...

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...into the trough of the sea, capsize,
and in less than five minutes we would have...

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...We hired a half-tamed Indian to do some washing for
us, and he took up quarters...

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...article.

All at once the town was thrown into a state of extraordinary excitement.
In mining parlance...

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...from different points of view, and
after each experiment delivered himself, in soliloquy, of one and...

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...for such leads, but they are often stumbled upon by accident in the
course of driving...

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...visions of the future whirled me
bodily over in bed or jerked me to a sitting...

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...found abundant enjoyment in being rich. A man offered me a
three-hundred-dollar horse, and wanted...

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...all his raving and
ranting, for my mind had work on hand, and it labored on...

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...swear so in my life. He raved like a
maniac, and tried to snatch a...

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...fingers,
and looking pale, old, and haggard. I halted, and looked at him. He
looked...

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...was such a common-place thing to do that it had
not attracted any attention. He...

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...the night’s events, as
Higbie gathered from a friend on the way home.

Higbie and I cleared...

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...I wanted to work--which I did not,
after being so wealthy. I had once been...

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...to work on a little
rubbishy claim of ours that had a shaft on it eight...

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...to be proud of. So I
was scared into being a city editor. I...

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...still barren. I spoke to Mr. Goodman. He
said:

“Dan used to make a good...

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...I learned, through his short
and surly answers to my cross-questioning, that he was certainly going...

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...excuse you.”

“Just as you say.”

A saloon-keeper’s boy passed by with a steaming pitcher of hot...

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...friendly. The day that the school report was next
due, the proprietor of the “Genessee”...

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... Joy sat on
every countenance, and there was a glad, almost fierce, intensity in
every eye,...

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...The fronts of the houses were
level with the street they faced, but their rear first...

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...who had his pockets full of such and a cumbersome
abundance of bright half dollars besides?...

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...(by wild cat I mean, in general terms, any claim not
located on the mother vein,...

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...claim made a stir in the market and went up to a
high figure, I searched...

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...the third said
he would do the same. But I was going after an inquest...

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...was to “salt” a wild cat claim and
sell out while the excitement was up. ...

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...borrowed forty dollars and
set out from San Francisco to try their fortunes in the new...

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...one man! A Sanitary Committee was
hurriedly organized, and its chairman mounted a vacant cart...

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...by a band of music and the whole population. Arrived
there, he said he did...

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...the
cavalcade moved on as if Virginia had ceased to be of importance, and
took its way...

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...was at a rate in the
neighborhood of three dollars for each man, woman and child...

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...a year.

One of the earliest nabobs that Nevada was delivered of wore $6,000 worth
of diamonds...

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...said:

“Here, that won’t do! He guessed two miles wider of the mark than I...

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...telegraph operator in Virginia on a salary
of a hundred dollars a month, and who, when...

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...he was in New York, and one or
two speculators went east but failed to find...

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...you fret--I’ll stand all the expenses myself.”

So Col. Jim stopped an empty omnibus, and they...

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...to Col. Jim,

“New York ain’t no sociable place, I don’t reckon--it ain’t no name...

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...estimate of the
people.

There was a grand time over Buck Fanshaw when he died. He...

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...of the mines. The committeeman, “Scotty” Briggs, made his
visit; and in after days it...

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...moment, and then said:

“You ruther hold over me, pard. I reckon I can’t call...

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...lives as a cat?
But you bet you he’s awful dead now, poor old boy, and...

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...go in and toot your horn,
if you don’t sell a clam. Put Buck through...

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...man
that could have done it. He waltzed in with a spanner in one hand...

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...of
funeral pomp had never been seen in Virginia. The plumed hearse, the
dirge-breathing brass bands,...

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...until he has “killed his man.” That was
the very expression used.

If an unknown individual...

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...the nineteenth century the
condition of things would be so entirely changed that unless he rose...

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...It was a jury composed of two desperadoes,
two low beer-house politicians, three bar-keepers, two ranchmen...

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...deserted bankers and
merchants to overwhelm him with obsequious service; when he shouldered
his way to a...

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...But don’t
rush into danger and then say I gave you no warning. I am...

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...for several
months.

An inquest...

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...was shot dead.

Oh, there was no excitement about it--he merely “remarked” the small
circumstance!

Four months later...

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...and it was
generally believed among the people that Williams’s friends and enemies
would make the assassination...

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... direction through his clothing, and entered his body at the small...

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... with him to “look out! get out of the way!” and they had...

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... --five or six more were to be killed before night. Reeder was taken
...

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...asserted by the
desperadoes that one of their brethren (Joe McGee, a special policeman)
was known to...

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...early boyhood. He was a
rough, honest creature, full of pluck, and just as full...

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...very little
thought of such an enterprise. There were no courts and no officers;
there was...

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...certainly, Capt. Ned,--nobody denies that,--but--”

“Then I’m going to hang him, that’s all. Everybody...

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...I
don’t want to send him off without a show for hereafter.”

This was another obstacle. ...

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...chapters of Genesis, with deep feeling--paused a moment,
closed the book reverently, and said with a...

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...get by preying upon chance passengers who stopped
over with them a day when traveling by...

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...then proceed to his
quarters and set to work with his imagination in a state of...

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...went on. Every time the stranger tried to appease the
enemy he only made matters...

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...be of the party. They judged that the Duke’s constant presence and
the lawyer’s protracted...

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...the other in Behring’s
Strait. The blonde had long ago been well-nigh persuaded that her...

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...feeble, struggling, stupid
journal, and the absence of the novel probably shook public confidence;
at any rate,...

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...the captain cried,
“Nor tempt so wild a storm;”
But still the raging mules advanced,
And still...

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...words have passed his lips
The dauntless prophet say’th,
When every soul about him seeth
A wonder crown...

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...price for
all express matter brought by stage), and $100 a ton for full loads.
One Virginia...

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...to each the labor of producing
$300,000 in bullion during the twelve months. Allowing them...

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...squared, let down into the deep maw of the mine
and built up there. Twenty...

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...each; under the bins are rows
of wagons loading from chutes and trap-doors in the bins,...

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...the surface, we
entered a tunnel leading into the Central,...

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...of the perpendicular by the
weight resting upon them from...

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... However, the day for large figures is approaching; the Sutro...

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...boys always found fault with
his condition; he was often moderately but never satisfactorily drunk.
I never...

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...old deacon Ferguson up and scooted him through the window and he lit
on old Miss...

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...rations and a blanket along and sleep in the
coffin nights. He was anchored out...

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...experiment, so to speak.
But mind you, there ain’t anything ever reely lost; everything that
people can’t...

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...on--put on it--sacred to--the
m-e-m-o-r-y--of fourteen y-a-r-d-s--of three-ply--car---pet--containing
all that was--m-o-r-t-a-l--of--of--W-i-l-l-i-a-m--W-h-e--’

Jim Blaine had been growing gradually drowsy...

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...one interfered.

There are seventy thousand (and possibly one hundred thousand) Chinamen
on the Pacific coast. ...

Page 263

...twice on the same victim in the
course of the same month--but the public treasury was...

Page 264

... Every ship
that sails from San Francisco carries away a heavy freight of Chinese
corpses--or did,...

Page 265

...opium on the end of a wire, sets it on
...

Page 266

...that “Sometime Chinaman buy ticket one dollar hap, ketch um two tree
hundred, sometime no ketch...

Page 267

...dollars’ worth of those pumpkins in--however, the
territorial legislature was usually spoken of as the “asylum”)....

Page 268

...some specie laid
up. If anybody had told me that it would take me two...

Page 269

...Dumas, etc., have been able to
produce so many books. If these authors had wrought...

Page 270

...mill-site, near the mine. My first idea
was to kill Dan. But I changed...

Page 271

...and said that if he only had a little brandy to take along with
him, to...

Page 272

...head-over-heels overboard, of
course. A pause; a sigh or two of pain, and then a...

Page 273

...mysterious messenger of good
tidings, some were fain to believe. It was the nation’s emblem
transfigured...

Page 274

...species, the trees being chiefly of one monotonous
family--redwood, pine, spruce, fir--and so, at a near...

Page 275

...unfolding, its gradual, harmonious development, its culminating
graces--and just as one begins to tire of it,...

Page 276

...If it is Winter, it
will rain--and if it is Summer, it won’t rain, and you...

Page 277

... Not always and
unvaryingly, but about one hundred and forty-three months out of twelve
years, perhaps....

Page 278

...done, and you may still see,
in places, its grassy slopes and levels torn and guttered...

Page 279

...is pitiful to
think upon.

It was a splendid population--for all the slow, sleepy, sluggish-brained
sloths staid at...

Page 280

...memory rather than a present reality--and then they collected
twenty-five hundred dollars in gold and gave...

Page 281

...at
the best hotel, exhibited my clothes in the most conspicuous places,
infested the opera, and learned...

Page 282

...in the east. But I could not
hear from Dan. My letters miscarried or...

Page 283

...a third and still severer shock
came, and as I reeled about on the pavement trying...

Page 284

...flew down stairs, in the principal hotel, with nothing
on but one brief undergarment--met a chambermaid,...

Page 285

...in the atmosphere where he had stood.

After the first shock, an Oakland minister said:

“Keep your...

Page 286

... The stock in
this company is all full paid...

Page 287

...for the Golden Era. C. H. Webb had
established a very excellent literary weekly called the...

Page 288

...at five per
cent a month, and show me clearly that there was no attempt at...

Page 289

...near the wharves. Then;
for a while, he had gained a meagre living by sewing...

Page 290

...in his pocket. He
idled through unfrequented streets, stopping in doorways and corners to
take it...

Page 291

...have been in there, and eaten
your sumptuous supper, and picked your teeth, and hummed your...

Page 292

...had once been the heart of the teeming
hive, the centre of the city. When...

Page 293

...eight months without finding gold enough to make
a snuff-box--his grocery bill running up relentlessly all...

Page 294

...is all lovely with soiled lumps and leaves and sprays of
gold. Sometimes that one...

Page 295

...eighteen years of
unrequited toil and blighted hopes--was one of the gentlest spirits that
ever bore its...

Page 296

...or seven grains of gold he was satisfied--he
didn’t want no better prospect ‘n’ that--‘n’ then...

Page 297

...a goin’ end over end, an’ a snortin’ an’ a sneez’n’, an’ a clawin’
an’ a...

Page 298

...we had never “struck” a pocket. We had panned
up and down the hillsides till...

Page 299

...seek further.




CHAPTER LXII.

After a three months’ absence, I found myself in San Francisco again,
without a...

Page 300

...be devised for him and used solely to welcome his coming and wave
him God-speed in...

Page 301

...instant the Southerners began to go down before the sweep
of the Northern armies, he ran...

Page 302

...weather, and exposing hairy arms, gaudy with red and
blue anchors, ships, and goddesses of liberty...

Page 303

...against him and been routed,
except the quiet passenger Williams. He had never been able...

Page 304

...thank him for clearing this matter up for me.
And that is what I want to...

Page 305

...Morgan and Winthrop L. Willis, one a
Methodist and the other an Old School Baptist,...

Page 306

...imaginary cough, drew out of the battle
and went away, a vanquished man. Then cheers...

Page 307

...them, I saw these homes surrounded by ample yards, thickly
clad with green grass, and shaded...

Page 308

...of cramped and crowded
street-cars, I met dusky native women sweeping by, free as the wind,...

Page 309

...the floor till morning. Meantime it is comforting to curse the
tropics in occasional wakeful...

Page 310

...through an impenetrable fog, and ran by a pocket
compass in the hands of Captain Fish,...

Page 311

...me with apprehension. I said to my self, this
creature is planning some new outrage,...

Page 312

...green foliage sheltering clusters of
cocoa-nuts--not more picturesque than a forest of collossal ragged
parasols, with bunches...

Page 313

...How sad it is to think of the multitudes
who have gone to their graves in...

Page 314

...of Captain Cook’s time, and their
condition to-day.

Their work speaks for itself.




CHAPTER LXV.

By and by, after...

Page 315

...of their priests that they should draw a line where
these bones now lie, and take...

Page 316

...horse. I broke the back-bone of a Chief over his rump and set
out to...

Page 317

...upon. A victim said to one of these fellows one day:

“But I know I...

Page 318

...window and his port side through another! I decline to
believe this story, but I...

Page 319

...is
toward the ends of the earth, I recognize a familiar home air. But the
words...

Page 320

...natural yellow running across
the face from ear to ear, and eyes twinkling out of this...

Page 321

...by hard drinking, and that in some kinds of
diseases it will restore health after all...

Page 322

...in presence of few
spectators, and only by permission duly procured from the authorities and
the payment...

Page 323

...in the household troops, no doubt? Minister of the
Interior, likely? Secretary of war?...

Page 324

...dust or blemish upon
them. He bears himself with a calm, stately dignity, and is...

Page 325

...thing looks plausible.

In former times, among the Islanders, not only a plurality of wives was
customary,...

Page 326

...King, educated, cultivated and refined Christian
gentleman as he undoubtedly is, still turns to the idols...

Page 327

...vast congregations. In the midst of
the reading of a hymn a brown, stately dame...

Page 328

...however;
they sport the economical Kanaka horse or “hoof it” with the plebeians.

Then there is his...

Page 329

...Excellency the Minister of Public Instruction.

Next, their Excellencies the Governors of Oahu, Hawaii, etc., and...

Page 330

...of the population, one is almost inclined to wonder
where...

Page 331

...fired three volleys of musketry--the wailing being
previously silenced to permit of the guns being heard....

Page 332

...Kamehameha the Conqueror, who
died fifty years ago--in 1819, the year before the first missionaries
came.

...

Page 333

... “When Kamehameha was dangerously sick, and the priests were unable
...

Page 334

... devotions to his feathered god, Kukailimoku, were concluded, a
...

Page 335

...to the house. About twelve he was carried
once...

Page 336

... ‘Perhaps his body is not at our disposal; that is more properly with
...

Page 337

... agreed to. It was now break of day. As...

Page 338

...die; for it was not believed that
Kamehameha’s departure was...

Page 339

...little of it would go a great way with most of us.




CHAPTER LXIX.

Bound for Hawaii...

Page 340

...was out of the question when he was on watch. He was a source
of...

Page 341

...her lee bulwarks, and sparkling sheets of spray
dashing high over her bows and raining upon...

Page 342

...the ocean, which
is always in sight, save that occasionally you find yourself buried in
the forest...

Page 343

...several gentlemen
present; but there was one person, a middle aged man, with an absent look
in...

Page 344

...happen for
hundreds of dollars. I can show you her letter, if you would like...

Page 345

...together with his mother about turnips. When company
came, he made it his loving duty...

Page 346

... ...

Page 347

...were crisp, and vigorous, and delivered with a confidence
that almost compelled conviction; but at such...

Page 348

...to
state them.

“Under a...

Page 349

...had done it sooner. To wit, he sent an
intelligible rescript or translation of his...

Page 350

...perfect counterpart of every knot and branch and leaf,
and even nut, for curiosity seekers of...

Page 351

...traveled that causeway when urgent business
connected with heavenly affairs called him down to the seashore...

Page 352

...He and his men
inflicted bodily injury upon many of them at different times, and killed
at...

Page 353

...the breezy morning we went ashore and visited the ruined temple of the
last god Lono....

Page 354

...so well up on the mountain side
that if you prayed there twenty-four times a day...

Page 355

...a goddess named Kaikilani Aiii. Remorse of
conscience drove him mad, and tradition presents us...

Page 356

...down with the women!

They saw him eat from the same vessel with them, and were...

Page 357

...was without a religion.

The missionary ship arrived in safety shortly afterward, timed by
providential exactness to...

Page 358

...castles rising out of the
restless sea. When this novelty ceased to be a novelty,...

Page 359

...wide, and thirteen high.

In those days, if a man killed another anywhere on the island...

Page 360

...Yet some of the
lava blocks quarried out, brought over rough, broken ground, and built
into this...

Page 361

...trouble with her
fierce husband, and hide under it until his wrath was appeased. But
these...

Page 362

...passed through
one a hundred feet long, which leads through a spur of the hill and...

Page 363

...ciphering, we
hurried on to the hotel.

By the path it is half a mile from the...

Page 364

...the twinkling fires in the remote
corners of the crater seem countless leagues removed--made them seem...

Page 365

...swallowed in the
crimson cauldron. Then the wide expanse of the “thaw” maintained a ruddy
glow...

Page 366

...no trick at all to imagine
that you are sweeping down a river on a large...

Page 367

...that seemed to
tower to the sky. The only cheerful objects were the glinting stars...

Page 368

...with its unapproachable
splendor. The mere distant jets, sparkling up through an intervening
gossamer veil of...

Page 369

...there jets of lava
sprung hundreds of feet into the air and burst into rocket-sprays that
returned...

Page 370

...from turning corners and failed; how I
moved heaven and earth to get him out of...

Page 371

...evidences of fright. When they became
convinced at last that the water was friendly and...

Page 372

...only airy glimpses of the ferny front appeared through it--then
swept aloft and left it glorified...

Page 373

...had an inside one, too. That
was the yawning dead crater, into which we now...

Page 374

...left pinnacled in mid-heaven, a forgotten relic of a
vanished world.

While the hush yet brooded, the...

Page 375

...this same man boring through and through me with his intense
eye, and noted again his...

Page 376

...as I finished a statement I
was making for the instruction of a group of friends...

Page 377

...of Mississippi--boyhood friend of mine--bosom comrade in later
years. Heaven rest his noble spirit, he...

Page 378

...in his own handwriting begging his friends to
suspect no innocent person of having any thing...

Page 379

...amusement, I will mention that the
gentlemen gave a good part of their time every day,...

Page 380

...me, at
first, grew steadily more and more dreary, till not a vestige of fun
seemed left,...

Page 381

...myself; “I might have
known it.” I thought of suicide, pretended illness, flight. I...

Page 382

...clause, I happened to
turn and catch Mrs.--‘s intent and waiting eye; my conversation with her
flashed...

Page 383

...night,” said Mike the agent.

“Well, don’t speak so loud,” I said. “You needn’t remind...

Page 384

...smell the powder.

“You see how I am situated. If I had four hands--so that...

Page 385

...any chances with these bloody
savages?”

Presently Mike said:

“Now the time’s up, anyway. I’m freezing.”

“Well freeze....

Page 386

...came by the way of the Isthmus to New York--a trip that was not much
of...

Page 387

...post and a more powerful--President of the Twelve.
The neighbors rose up and drove the Mormons...

Page 388

...Iowa, and poverty, want,
hunger, cold, sickness, grief and persecution did their work, and many
succumbed and...

Page 389

...Joseph by the
will of heaven; “prophet,” “seer,” “revelator.” There was but one
dignity higher which...

Page 390

...which could not be executed. The federal judges
opened court in a land filled with...

Page 391

...day. The whole United States rang with its horrors. A few items
will refresh...

Page 392

...the upper end of the “Meadows,” resumed civilized apparel,
washed off their paint, and then, heavily...

Page 393

...a spectacle it must
have been to see this grim veteran, solitary and alone in his...

Page 394

...it whatever from the pulpit, until several years after the
occurrence.

“3. The flight to the...

Page 395

...edits, sets the type, and prints his paper, all
alone; but he delights to speak of...

Page 396

...he also was at
first laboring had been clearly and repeatedly pointed out. This same
man,...

Page 397

...town that he has horsewhipped me.
That fact having been made public, all the facts in...

Page 398

... He therefore paid him a visit. From that interview
he assured me that he...

Page 399

...necessary
Vigilance Committee. But by following I made a fatal mistake. Following
was entering a...

Page 400

...I have already told you that I am
here for a very different purpose.”

“Yet your language...

Page 401

...regard as such.
Show me the charges, and I will try, at all events; and if...

Page 402

...especially to the introductory paragraph just before quoted.
He replied, “if they are not charges, they...

Page 403

...“alone.”
[The reader is requested not to skip the following.--M. T.:]

STRATEGY AND MESMERISM.
To gain...

Page 404

...to time till I got it to suit me,
my aim being to make it look...

Page 405

...If you are resolved to compel me to sign
something, Philip Lynch’s hand must write at...

Page 406

...rise, and I did so pitying him from the very bottom
of my soul, to think...

Page 407

...they may
have been, or at least to his meaning to make an assault upon me,...

Page 408

...testify that I was killed by John
B. Winters in self-defence, for the conviction of...

Page 409

...to curb oppression, and to
benefit man’s world and God’s earth.

...