Mark Twain's Letters — Volume 6 (1907-1910)

By Mark Twain

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...MARK TWAIN'S LETTERS 1907-1910

VOLUME VI.

By Mark Twain


ARRANGED WITH COMMENT BY ALBERT BIGELOW PAINE




XLVI. LETTERS 1907-08....

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... ...

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...anger me. But even if it angered me such words
as those of Professor Phelps would...

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... ...

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...England a week or two
longer--I can't tell, yet. I do very much want to meet...

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...in London:

...

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... MARK TWAIN


Elinor Glyn, author of Three...

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...Sincerely Yours,
...

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...Andrew Lang, in London:

...

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... greatest joy in life-presented itself to him always with the thought
...

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...L. CLEMENS.


The new home at Redding was completed in the...

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... Very truly yours,
...

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...and in all cases the suggestions come
to the brain from the outside. The brain never...

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... ...

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... With love to...

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...is competent and asks no help and gets none. I have retired from New
York for...

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...business as was the influence of all the
rest of the Holy Family put together.

You have...

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...Children's
Theatre of the East side, New York. And it supports and re-affirms what
I have so...

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...fabrics and the making of clothes. Hundreds of our children
learn, the plays by listening without...

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...yours,
...

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...no, my lecturing days are over for good and all.

...

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...This place seemed at its best when all around was
summer-green; later it seemed at its...

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... With doubt he's not perplexed:
...

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...'08.

DEAR MR. WOOD,--The beautiful mantel was put in its place an hour ago,
and its friendly...

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... STORMFIELD, REDDING, CONNECTICUT,
...

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... and a letter from him came one day to Stormfield concerning his new
...

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...and the 40.

"It's short for Take 40--or as we postmen say, grab 40"

"Go on, please,...

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...S. L. CLEMENS.


It was in 1907 that Clemens had seen...

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... ...

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... ...

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...the result is as comely and substantial a legislative edifice as
lifts its domes and towers...

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...that it had
when Mrs. Eddy stole it from Quimby; that its healing principle (its
most valuable...

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... ...

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...laundress. The cook and the maid, and the boy and
the roustabout and Jean's coachman are...

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... ...

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...physician's advice, he went back to
those balmy islands. He...

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...see me as
he said he was. So that incident is closed. And pleasantly and entirely
satisfactorily....

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... ...

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...you have said about me: and even if I don't I am proud and well
contented,...

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... ...

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...Helen
Allen: writing had become an effort to him. Yet...

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...some live
stock and poultry. After her death he had...

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...(April 14th).

...

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... The bloodroot is white...

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...of old rugged Carlyle,
...

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...on the shoulder;
...

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... With pity and wisdom and love?

...

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... With that...