Mark Twain's Letters — Volume 4 (1886-1900)

By Mark Twain

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...MARK TWAIN'S LETTERS 1886-1900

VOLUME IV.


By Mark Twain


ARRANGED WITH COMMENT BY ALBERT BIGELOW PAINE





XXVI. LETTERS, 1886-87....

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... ...

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...secret. When I was eighteen, a young medical student
named Barrett lived in Columbia (Ky.) eighteen...

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... said: "It is as pathetic a romance as any that has crossed
...

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...and Clara sat up in bed at Mrs. McElroy's and cried
about it, and so did...

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...Mark Twain sometimes found it necessary to write
picturesque letters of...

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...you did it again last night--"
D.W.]

...

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...is
an indignant sense of insult; his first deed is the penning of a sharp
answer. He...

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...had been paid it
by famous musical people; but he forgot to tell me what his...

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... Yours Truly.


There was a day, now happily nearly...

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...sent an invitation for Mark Twain to come and see the play
...

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...that
it is 432 miles to Susquehanna? Would it be handy for you to send me
the...

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...some cases even violent. Nine
students have been called home. The trustees of the college have...

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... if for no other reason, to show the absurdity of copyright
...

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...at a dollar apiece and fetch down the market for the genuine
hundred-dollar bond? What could...

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...into my mind. Take that case of a few years ago where the P. M.
General...

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... ...

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... ...

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...longer I live the clearer I perceive how unmatchable, how
unapproachable, a compliment one pays when...

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...14, '87.

MY DEAR MISS GILDER,--We shall spend the summer at the same old
place-the remote farm...

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... Notes (added twenty-two years later):

Stormfield, April 30, 1909. It...

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...letter we get a pretty and peaceful picture of
"Rest-and-be-Thankful." These were Mark Twain's balmy days....

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... ...

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...himself for these occasions,
indicating by graduated underscorings, the exact values he wished to
give to words...

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... ...

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...never find it out
until it is next to impossible to break it up and set...

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...1872 he copyrighted 'Roughing It' in England, and
piratical publishers there...

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... S. L. CLEMENS.


...

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...or 4 months, I
reckon, and then the strain will let up and we can breathe...

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... S. L. Clemens M. A.


...

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...I make the long crossing, and perhaps you can come there.
Will you? I want to...

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... story carefully, and to write to him about it a letter...

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...picture revises, and revises, and revises--and then
revises, and revises, and revises; and then repeats. And...

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...quite attained.


*****

To Orion Clemens, in Keokuk, Ia.:

...

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... He seems to have worked there
successfully, though what improvement...

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...ask for things now. The machine isn't done."

...

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...liked to bring up
every creature we knew in those days--even the dumb animals--it would be
bathing...

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... ...

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...this himself,
and tries to improve upon me, but he doesn't...

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...necessary to report some of the talk of his
characters observe how cautiously and anxiously he...

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... MARK TWAIN.




XXIX. LETTERS, 1889. THE...

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...slowly,
by hand, and fastened our eyes on the space-selecting pins. The first
pin-block projected its third...

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...SAM.


Judge of the elation which such a letter would produce...

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...how public the place nor how far off she is,
he makes a bound into the...

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...Howells spare you to me? Can't you come and
stay with me? The house is cool...

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...I mixed in and tried to give him points on his own
trade.

Send this note and...

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...matters had made his
visit impossible. From the next letter...

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...his MS., fearing that he might lay a ruthless hand on some of
...

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... MARK.


Howells's approval of the Yankee came almost...

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...a
humaner.

As a rule a critic's dissent merely enrages, and so does no good; but
by the...

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...called him--was no
longer at hand to supervise and to correct...

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...to the proprietors of the N. Y.
Sun, Herald, Times, World, Harper Brothers and John F....

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...amount in the same hour. Considering that a good fair
compositor sets 700 and distributes 700...

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...sold a
penny's worth of the property until the machine was entirely finished
and proven by the...

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...disinvited the boys I thought I was going
to punch billiards with, upstairs to-night.

Patrick is one...

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...will turn to about the five hundredth page, you will
find a state paper of my...

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...we gather from these letters is that Paige
has taken the...

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...had given it his
highest commendation, and it seems that his...

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...stay over night with you as soon as I
can get a chance.

We are in the...

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...It is you who
are thin-skinned. An Englishman may write with the most brutal frankness
about any...

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... ...

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...actually
imposed upon the world the superstition that a painting by Raphael is
more valuable to the...

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...the cultivated classes. I
was not equipped for it, either by native gifts or training. And...

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... Dr. John Brown's son, whom Mark Twain and his wife had known in 1873
...

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...Burbank with it on the road.
Now, however, James A. ...

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...have talked with the madam, and here is the result. I will go down to
the...

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...in the interval, and your satisfaction with its
character and prospects. I had forgotten all that....

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... machine, but it was simpler, less expensive, occupied less room.
...

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...6 minutes for the day.

I claim yet, as I have always claimed, that the machine's...

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... Clemens himself went down to
Washington and perhaps warmed Jones...

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...liberation-parties, I do not quite
know how to proceed. Let me quote here the paragraph referred...

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...a house afire in the midst of
a city of eighty millions of inhabitants? Yet instead...

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...thirst for his life? Do you not believe
that if your wife or your child or...

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...you could get a day off and make those two or
three Californians buy those privileges,...

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...financiering.

It was also the end of Mark Twain's capital. ...

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... ...

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...culture in that direction.
And I've done "pocket-mining" during three months in the one little
patch of...

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...and an ass for 55.

Now then; as the most valuable capital or culture or education...

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... Ys ever
...

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...cylinders in two sittings, then found I could
have said about as much with the pen...

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...to blame. But it was
generally the smaller annoyances of...

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...life were commonplaces with
us. Lord save us all from old age and broken health and...

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... ...

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...except
heaven and hell, and I have only a vague curiosity as concerns one of
those.

I found...

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...to McClure and Laffan. In
August, however, he was able...

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...Sept. 20, 1891.

...

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...the principal inn; had
a good dinner and afterwards along walk out of town on the...

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...such a
phenomenally dirty house.

An hour ago we saw the Falls of the Rhone, a prodigiously...

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...we
were when we started.

Notes--I make millions of them; and so I get no time to...

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... Monday, 11 a.m.,...

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... ...

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...the hour in a wholly unknown land and on an uncharted river!
Confound it, we stopped...

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...But then he
characteristically forgot all about it, and when he...

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...still morning, with a brilliant sun, and very
hot--outside; but I am under cover of the...

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...in her.

We reached here after dark. We were due about 4.30, counting by
distance, but we...

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... MARK.


The Clemenses settled in Berlin...

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...also, and drop me a line to let me know they have
arrived.

I shall write the...

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...left with you are a few that have a recent look and
are written on rather...

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...in Berlin as in New York, and at court assemblies and
embassies he was always a...

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... ...

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...up, on various
accounts--and this was the last chance. I am sorry for Mamma--I wish she
could...

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... ...

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... ...

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...that now and then
Mark Twain plunged into with an enthusiasm...

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...by way of Switzerland.
In September Mrs. Clemens's sister, Mrs. Crane,...

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...three quarters of an hour. It took
us 3 1/2 hours to get here, instead of...

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...comment on this letter is required; it fully explains itself.
Perhaps...

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...and is a
cheery and cheerful presence in the house. The butler is equipped with a
little...

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...dated 1343--he could have known Boccaccio and spent his afternoons
in Fiesole listening to the Decameron...

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... From letters to Mrs.
Crane and to Mr. Hall we...

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... ...

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...a million American homes. There was plenty
of sale for it--indeed, that was just the trouble;...

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...fault with
you about something. But most surely that cannot be. I tell her that
although I...

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...was in New York
last summer! I would have tried my best to raise it. It...

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...success not only from
a business standpoint, but with that achievement back of him, has been
great...

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...judgment, I think I am
destitute of it.

I am writing a companion to the Prince and...

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...he had conceived the idea of writing her story. As far back
...

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...HALL,--I am busy getting ready to sail the 22d, in the Kaiser
Wilhelm II.

I send herewith...

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...real
that I almost believe it is real. I wonder...

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... ...

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...he was
clearly a good deal disheartened--anxious for freedom.


*****

To Fred J....

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...to pour in a big cash
capital and jump L. A. L. up to enormous prosperity....

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...storm; 'The
windy and watery elements raged. Tears and prayers was had recourse to,
but was of...

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...about it, and of course, it would be the
very farthest from his desire to imperil,...

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...in New York:

...

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... ...

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...old enough to remember the summer of 1893 may recall
it...

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...me four years and cost me $100,000 to finish the other
machine after it was apparently...

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...difficult of critics, confesses it, and without
reserves or qualifications. Formerly she would not consent that...

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...way that will commend him to the Sunday schools.
I've been thinking out his first life-days...

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...may be afforded what little relief is in our power. All
right--I'm willing; (this is honest)...

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...it's a long year-for you and me! I never knew the
...

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...to take charge of my family and
help them through the difficult journeys commanded by the...

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...admirer of Mark Twain's work. It was a
mirthful evening,...

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...but don't begin till I tell you my
scheme has failed." And he added: "Keep me...

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...fools last night
laughed till they cried over the particulars of that old forgotten
crime.

John Mackay has...

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...my Xmas cablegram would be
definite, and make you all jump with jubilation; but the thought...

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...viewed the scenery and
talked, for the weather was May weather, and the soft dream-pictures of
hill...

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...name of the "Belle of New York." In the letters that follow we get
the echo...

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...of letters. Tuesday morning I was smart enough to finish and
mail my long letter to...

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...meet James J. Corbett--"Gentleman Jim," as he
was sometimes called--the champion...

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...the crowd: then
at last Corbett appeared in the ring and the 8,000 people present went
mad...

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...think I wrote
until 2 or half past. Then I walked leisurely out to Mr. Rogers's...

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...is Paris.
Dr. Charcot's pupils and disciples are right there and ready to your
hand without fetching...

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... Gwen, a popular novel of that day, was written by Blanche Willis
...

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... I greet you with love and...

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...that one was.
Some of those people complained of fatigue but I don't seem to know...

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...here the
7th of March, in the New York. So his private secretary, Miss Harrison,
wrote and...

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...said:

"There is a splendid chance open to you. I know a man--a prominent
man--who has written...

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...effort in that direction.

Of course the failure of Mark Twain's...

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...and cannot hear the drums
nor see the wheeling squadrons. You only seem to see rout,...

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...'94.

DEAR MR. ROGERS,--I find the Madam ever so much better in health and
strength. The air...

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... ...

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... about Paul Bourget and his Outre-Mer chapters--laughing at them and
...

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...whirling and walked over
to the rue Scribe--4 P. M.--and asked a question or two and...

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... With love,
...

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...the book a good way ahead in the Great
Trial, which is the difficult part which...

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...whom by good luck I haven't damaged yet that when the wreckage
presently floats ashore he...

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...were unlucky people. All my life I have
stumbled upon lucky chances of large size, and...

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... ...

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... ...

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...as much fancy
work and invention on both sides of the historical road as I pleased.
But...

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...169 RUE DE L'UNIVERSITE,
...

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...remain behind anyway.

Mrs. C. is feeling so well that she is not going to try...

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...over as luggage; then I've got to find
somebody on the dock who will agree to...

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... ...

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...were ready to sail from Vancouver five thousand
dollars had been...

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... He was beset by other carbuncles, but would
seem not...

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...food and beds and frantic little ships, but they put up with
the worst that befalls...

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...May was given to me yesterday in Johannesburg
by an American lady who lives there, and...

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...me.

These prisoners are strong men, prominent men, and I believe they are
all educated men. They...

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...presently
to the Cape--and so, in the course of time, we shall get through and
sail for...

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...had ridden into the Transvaal in support of a Rhodes scheme for an
...

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...him, had to face alone this cruel blow.
There was no...

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...which has always been filled with
love for you, and respect and admiration; and I would...

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...train glided away, her mother
throwing back kisses and watching her through her tears. One year,...

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...Mrs. H. H. Rogers, in New York City:

For and in behalf of Helen Keller, stone...

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...but she will find it a difficult
and disheartening job, and meanwhile what is to become...

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...you have gone
far and away beyond the sum I expected--may your lines fall in pleasant
places...

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...write to me? Indeed I do. I do not want most
people to write, but I...

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...home from an absence that its
face did not light up and speak out its eloquent...

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... MARK.


The letters to Mr. Rogers were, for...

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...it is. There is no
hurry--at any rate there is no limit.

Jean's spirits are good; Clara's...

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... would load up every important jail and saloon in America with...

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...Hartford:

...

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...on it and go properly crazy over it.

Now, these countries are different: they would do...

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...Vice Consul made the
contract for me yesterday-to-wit: a barber is to come every morning 8.30
and...

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... ...

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... ...

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... MARK TWAIN.

P. S. This is not a...

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...be out of bed in a couple of
days, but must stay in the house a...

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...one was hustled. Below, I ran across
the London Times correspondent, and he showed me the...

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...by some women--daughters, no doubt.
We don't want to see them lose any thing. B----- is...

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...D. Howells, in New York:

...

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...play. I get into immense
spirits as soon as my day is fairly started. Of course...

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...and then he read or spoke to aid some benefit,
and...

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...right, and asked the grandly-uniformed porter for
the book and said we wished to write our...

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...promise--"Promise what?" I said--"to be quiet about
this? Indeed I won't--it's the best thing that ever...

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... was once more borne into the clouds on the prospect of...

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...the jacquard and must have our No. 2.

"You say that a middle-sized Austrian factory employs...

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... ...

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...it must
be a strong pleasure, mixed with a sauce of apprehension--enough to
make it just schmeck,...

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...for a couple of
weeks ago when the Weekly came containing that handsome reference to
me I...

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...unremitting effort.
I could make all of those things go if I would take the trouble...

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... accommodate itself to a central idea, so that the good writing in...

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...any right to criticise books, and I don't do it except when I
hate them. I...

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...[Inclosed with the foregoing.]

Among the inadequate attempts to account for the assassination we must
concede high...

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...I catch another
leisure moment. Note how suddenly a thing can become habit, and how
indestructible the...

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...the other.

It's quite true--I don't read you "as much as I ought," nor anywhere
near half...

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...Krantz. Their rooms, so often
thronged with gay and distinguished people, were sometimes called
the "Second Embassy."...

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...peace without compulsion would be
against nature and not operative. A sliding scale of reduction of...

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...anybody can afford
it.


...

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...a
Potomac commission granted him by George Washington who was a personal
friend of his before the...

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...half nor allow me to print any
part of it, Man is not to me the...

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...a great time. At the banquet I heard their
chief orator make a most graceful and...

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...Ke-hehe! Spent m' vacation 'n Russia, 'n saw
Tolstoi; he said--" It made me shudder.

April 12....

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...Sunday is the only day that
brings unbearable leisure. I...

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...I am sorry: for she didn't know
anything about the subject, and I did; and one...

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...is, and how
mistaken he is in his estimate of his character and powers and qualities
and...

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...go to bed. This
afternoon he left a luncheon-party half an hour ahead of the rest,...

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... ...

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...investing in it. (He would get a
verdict.)

...

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...was to read several pieces,
and I played the same game with all of them, and...

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... appreciation that Walker was moved to send an additional $200 check
...

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...translation of the Official Record (unabridged) of the Trials
and Rehabilitation of Joan of Arc, and...

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...abusing it,) and a letter from John Brisben Walker enclosing
$200 additional pay for the article...

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...Jan. 8, 1900.

DEAR JOE,--Mental Telepathy has scored another. Mental Telegraphy will
be greatly respected a...

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...trial. Many an ass in America, is getting
a deal of benefit out of X-Science's new...

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...the face
without laughing.

See what a powerful hold our ancient superstitions have upon us:
two weeks ago,...

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...the highest order of grit, and you have a right to be
proud of yourself. No...

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...as of yesterday. If you will notice, there is seldom
a telegram in a paper which...

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...it had been written about the present war.

I believe that in the next chapter my...

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... ...

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... ...

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...and
a disproportion of the other prominent Generals are of Irish and Scotch
breed-keeping up the traditions...

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...in the world do you find such
trees as in England."...

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...I dined with the Chief Justice a month ago and he was as
well-conditioned as an...

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...period at a family hotel, an amusing picture of which
follows.


*****

To...

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...sailed for New York October 6th, and something more than a week
...

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... great size."

The little note that follows...