Mark Twain's Letters — Volume 3 (1876-1885)

By Mark Twain

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...MARK TWAIN'S LETTERS 1876-1885


VOLUME III.

By Mark Twain


ARRANGED WITH COMMENT BY ALBERT BIGELOW PAINE




XVI. LETTERS, 1876,...

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...the
price they usually pay for my work, I believe) for although it is only
70 pages...

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...well. He closed by urging that Bliss "hurry out" 'Tom Sawyer.'
...

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...chapter to her
aunt and her mother (both sensitive and loyal subjects of the kingdom
of heaven,...

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... Yrs ever
...

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...and
I think that many of the pictures are considerably above the American
average, in conception if...

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... authors was to write a story, using the same plot, "blindfolded" as
...

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... there are at least two stories about it, or two halves of the same
...

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...therefore, let
Tom lie still till Autumn, Mr. Bliss, and make a holiday book of him...

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... prominent reformer and lecturer of the Civil War period. She had
...

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...your
help.

I'll bring my Blindfold Novelette, but shan't exhibit it unless you
exhibit yours. You would simply...

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...perched on a hill-top that overlooks a little
world of green valleys, shining rivers, sumptuous forests...

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... ELMIRA, Aug. 9, 1876.

MY DEAR HOWELLS,--I was just...

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...in the sky at once and the same
time were blue, green, pink, black, and the...

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... MARK


Howells promptly wrote again, urging him...

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...too old for me to read except as old matter; and if it went
in a...

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...to see it thought highly of it, and Hay had it set in type and...

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...Car perfection--except me. I said they wouldn't have been allowed
to court and quarrel there so...

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... dramatic writing. Such undertakings had uniformly failed, but he
...

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...and has nearly killed me.

Now the favor I ask of you is that you will...

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... ...

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...with its
"blighted hopes" and its "vanished dreams" and all that sort of drivel.
Will's were always...

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... getting it ready for production. Harte was a guest in the Clemens
...

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...The play drew some good houses in Washington, but it could not hold
...

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...up his mind not to let me get at the President; so at
the end of...

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...you than on this journey, which, my
boy, is saying a...

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... ...

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...Then
we find him plunging into another play, this time alone.


*****



To...

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...you to say those pleasant things.
But I am still plagued with doubts about Parts 1...

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...another trial by Augustin Daly, at the Fifth
Avenue Theater, New...

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...occurs to
me now. Your opinion and mine, uttered a year ago, and repeated more
than once...

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...if you cut out the kitchen and the stable
the drawing-room can't support the play by...

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... what that skilled artist really thought, and how he could do even
...

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... ...

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...Ticknor's diary, and am charmed with it, though I still
say he refers to too many...

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... knightly end with those other brave men that found death together
...

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...very black, straight as an Indian--age 24. Then
there was the farmer's wife (colored) and her...

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...never can pass that turn
alive." When I came in sight of that turn I saw...

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...evening late, when Lewis arrived from down town he
found his supper spread, and some presents...

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...character," there is an inscription within, which will
silence him; for it will teach him that...

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... ...

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... ...

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...religiously into two equal piles, and say to the
artist and lecturer, "Absorb these."

For instance--[Here follows...

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...fame.
The following characteristic letter was written in self-defense
...

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...It seems late in the day, now, after
a good deal of trouble has been taken...

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...had
set those gentlemen right who had not before understood the
...

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...gaily planned
ever came to a natural end or not. ...

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...dropping
you out of the Atlantic," he wrote; "and Mr. Houghton...

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...guest of
the occasion, besides holding the well-nigh sacred place he does in his
people's estimation; but...

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...(in a letter to
Mrs. Clemens) that the speech had made...

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...of business
responsibilities and annoyances, and the persecution of kindly letters
from well meaning strangers--to whom I...

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...before you go. I'm in dreadfully
low spirits about it.

...

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... ...

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...always shows.

But happily there is a market for apprentice work, else the "Innocents
Abroad" would have...

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...of the sort, but I
shall do the rest--and this is all a secret which you...

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...it they might write to him in your
care. Then if any correspondence ensues between you...

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...have told her about Annie's excellent house-keeping, also
about the great Bacon conflict; (I told you...

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...dangerous latitude comes of the fact
that we never have any temperance "rot" going on in...

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...that I am, that I owe as much
to your training...

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...bedroom, 31 feet long, and a parlor with 2 sofas, 12
chairs, a writing desk and...

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...Boston:

...

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...have been a noble
genius who devised this hotel. Lord, how blessed is the repose, the
tranquillity...

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...since; 3 days ago I concluded to move my manuscript
over to my den. Now the...

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... first, but presently extending them in the direction of Switzerland.
...

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...to make our course
plain, for us--so I am certain we can't get lost between here...

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...which was nothing to
Giessbach, but it made me resolve to drop you a line and...

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...as cheerful as if the barren and awful domes and
ramparts that towered around were the...

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... ...

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...his
concern is all about the horse. He can't bear...

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... ...

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... ...

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... ...

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...a courier to put out to
nurse, I shall not be in the market.

Last night the...

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...be
adopted.

It is lovely of you to keep that old pipe in such a place of...

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... ...

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... Your son
...

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...as you have got, that is, to where there's a storm at sea
approaching,--and we three...

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...believe that that
character exists in literature in so well-developed a condition as it
exists in Orion's...

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... ...

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...the matter--I'm hunting for my sock." She said,
"Are you hunting for it with a club?"

I...

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...I propose to leave Heidelberg for good.
Don't you see, the book (1800 MS pages,) may...

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...thought; they spoke,--one couldn't hear it
with the ears of the body, but what a voice...

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...that ever
lived; indeed, his humanity excluded every form of artificiality
...

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...five different religious denominations; last March
he withdrew from the deaconship in a Congregational Church and...

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...way he let it leak out that he did not underestimate the value
of his custom...

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...but I had let a mail
intervene; so by the time my letter reached him he...

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...a kaleidoscope shouldn't enjoy
itself as much as a telescope, nor a grindstone have as good...

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...That Mark Twain in many ways was hardly less child-like than his
...

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...tried it on
a hair-it wouldn't cut--tried it on my face--it made me cry--gave it
a 5-minute...

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...after its illustrations
himself, and a letter to Frank Bliss, of...

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...has
failed, our plan has miscarried. One obstruction after another intruded
itself, and our short sojourn of...

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...of travel in Paris--in fact,
it seemed to him far from...

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...line about
this, won't you? I imagine I see Orion on the stage, always gentle,
always melancholy,...

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...Boston:

...

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...solitary office in the land which majestic ignorance
and incapacity, coupled with purity of heart, could...

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...favored the idea of a third term. Some
days following...

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... ...

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...PALMER HOUSE, CHICAGO, Nov. 11.

Livy darling, I am getting a trifle leg-weary. Dr. Jackson called...

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...the second-story windows of
a drawing-room. It was for Gen. Grant to stand on and review...

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...of ratification.


*****



To Mrs. Clemens, in Hartford:

...

Page 100

...was mentioned by the orators his soul was
probably stirred pretty often, though he was too...

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...but had replied that he had already responded
to that toast...

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...ever a weary multitude listened to. Then Gen. Sherman
(Chairman) announced my toast, and the crowd...

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...table!
Half an hour ago he ran across me in the crowded halls and put his
arms...

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...you most heartily for the books--I am
devouring them--they have found a hungry place, and they...

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...out whatever you choose.

Of course I thought it wisest not to be there at all;...

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...indefinitely
in Elmira. The wear and tear of settling the house broke her down,
and she has...

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... ...

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...at 9 a.m., Jan. 27, 1547, seventeen and a half hours
before Henry VIII's death, by...

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... MARK.


...

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...Bro
...

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...offer you the distinction of membership. I do not know that we
...

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... petition which Holmes, Lowell, Longfellow, and others were to sign,
...

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...any obstruction between
him and the cellar." Language wasn't capable of conveying this woman's
disgust. But the...

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... ...

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... ...

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... Motley [a...

Page 117

...No, I keep my news; you keep your
compassion. Suffice it you to know, scoffer and...

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...not affect me--I am always calm--this is because I am used to it.

Well, good-bye, my...

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...away with him. He is accustomed
to seeing the publisher impoverish the author--that spectacle must
be getting...

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... of humor--in time grew into a book.

Mark...

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...ago, has grown this
result,--to wit, that I shall within the twelvemonth get $40,000 out of
this...

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... He pointed out some things that might be changed or
...

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...all Joe's laborious hours were for naught! It was as if he had come
to borrow...

Page 124

...Garfield. He had made speeches for Garfield
during the campaign...

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...With great respect
...

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...back Tuesday or Wednesday; and then just as soon thereafter as you
and Mrs. Howells and...

Page 127

...the preceding letter
introduces the most important, or at least the...

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...thing, and how she couldn't
give it up, but must carry her point. So at last...

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...ear, done in some plastic material at 16.

Then we went into the kitchen, and the...

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...Livy and Clara went there next day and came away
enchanted. A few nights later the...

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...in her mind. She said, "Go privately and start
the Gerhardts off to Paris, and say...

Page 132

... that my relations toward Uncle Remus are similar to those that...

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...I can't spell it in your matchless way. It is
marvelous the way you and Cable...

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... ...

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... lived for several years with the great telephone magnate, Theodore
...

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...answering the letters of strangers. It can't
be done through a short hand amanuensis--I've tried that--it...

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...leaf withered,
nor a rainbow vanished, nor a sun-flash missing from the waves, and now
it will...

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... MONTREAL, Nov. 28 '81.

Livy darling, you and Clara ought to...

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...the children, and ask them to give you my
love and a kiss from

...

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...of the time recovering; so you
see how bad I must...

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...Six Hundred that made
him see the living spectacle, the flash of flag and tongue-flame, the
rolling...

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...by malice. Perhaps
among all the letters he ever wrote,...

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...and the rest to follow, one after the other, to keep
the communication open while I...

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...not necessarily
malicious--and of course adverse criticism which is not malicious is a
thing which none but...

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... ...

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...to Canada unposted, will not know what course to pursue [to secure
copyright] when he gets...

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...courage became as water at the
thought of footlights and assembled...

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...me,
and afterwards schoolmates. Now they have a daughter 19 or 20 years old.
Spent an hour,...

Page 149

...ceased to express
regret that we came away from England the last time without going to...

Page 150

...writing
is-remarkable. I mean, in the effects produced and the impression left
behind. Why, the one is...

Page 151

...in time
became a banker, highly respected and a great influence....

Page 152

... weary of them, while the menace of his publisher's contract was
...

Page 153

...splendidly to the end; but you were only, I see now,
striking eleven. It is in...

Page 154

...least, around the character, or rather from
the peculiarities, of Orion Clemens. The Cable mentioned in...

Page 155

...will explain that
this is a law office and I think it probably does him as...

Page 156

...large time. He called
it an orgy. And no doubt it was, viewed from his standpoint.

I...

Page 157

...social circumstances from which
I couldn't escape."

...

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...forget
that Heaven is packed with a multitude of all nations and that these
people are all...

Page 159

...day after Jewell's funeral, and was to return here
day before yesterday, and she did--in a...

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...Caxolino, with an introduction by Mark Twain.
Osgood, Boston, 1883. ]--Evidently...

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... ...

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...your gang are home
again--may you never travel again, till you go aloft or alow. Charley
Clark...

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...ORION AND MOLLIE,--I don't know that I have anything new
to report, except that Livy is...

Page 164

... interest in the game became a sort of midsummer madness which
...

Page 165

...of that kind. When I wrote you, I thought I had it;
whereas I was only...

Page 166

... did not put in the entire month of October as they had
...

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... Howells pronounced "too thin and slight and not half long
...

Page 168

...from the story, all
ready to our hand.

...

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...into my
bosom."

Cable recovered in time,...

Page 170

...FRIEND AND PILGRIM BROTHER,

...

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...reason again,
I won't hold you to it unless I find I have got you down...

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...Howells, in Boston:

...

Page 173

... ...

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...wrote before, you were able to say the charges against him were
not proven. But you...

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... HARTFORD, Oct....

Page 176

... In the beginning Cable undertook to read the Bible
aloud...

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... this soldier fare that Clemens--very likely abetted by Howells
...

Page 178

...Toque Blew Snow-shoe Club, Montreal:

...

Page 179

...were never anything but the best of friends.


*****


To W. D. Howells, in Boston:

...

Page 180

...it is said that the congressional clock was set back in order
...

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...Mch. 2,'85.

MY DEAR SIR,--I take my earliest opportunity to answer your favor of
Feb. B----...

Page 182

... ...

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...was on the
very verge of it a year ago, and it was also easy to...

Page 184

...labored
and tedious analyses of feelings and motives, its paltry and tiresome
people, its unexciting and uninteresting...

Page 185

...MARK


It is as easy to understand Mark Twain's enjoyment of...

Page 186

...reasons--for both of these positions.

But it seems to me that temporary reasons are not mete...

Page 187

... to deliver a eulogy on the dead soldier, and doubtless wishing
...

Page 188

...accident.
(See that article.) And why not write Howard?

Franklin spoke positively of the frequent spreeing. In...

Page 189

...to teach them that, among other priceless
things not to be got in any other college...

Page 190

...the colored body-servant? the whole family hated him, but
that did not make any difference, the...

Page 191

...intervals
of exhaustion and slow recuperation--and at last he was able to tell me
that he had...

Page 192

...pretty fully covers the details of this undertaking.


*****


To W. D. Howells, in Boston:

...

Page 193

...the door of plenty--obstructed
by a Yale time-lock which is set for Jan. 1st. I can...

Page 194

... ...

Page 195

...many others sent letters;
Andrew Lang contributed a fine poem; also...

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...up to remote
and shining heights in their eyes, to very fellowship with the chambered
Nautilus itself,...