Mark Twain's Letters — Volume 2 (1867-1875)

By Mark Twain

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...MARK TWAIN'S LETTERS 1867-1875

By Mark Twain

ARRANGED WITH COMMENT BY ALBERT BIGELOW PAINE


VOLUME II.



*****



To Bret Harte,...

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...all
this against me I have taken the largest house in New York and cannot
back water....

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...propose to do. Then, what have I left to
write about? Manifestly nothing.

It isn't any use...

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... ...

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...unspeakably glad of it.

I haven't got anything to write, else I would write it. I...

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...any of you that
entitled me to your good opinion, (I say nothing of your love,...

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...would give the story of his travels. The
home letters...

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...we wanted to see at present and are glad we came here among the
Africans, Moors,...

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... Yrs.
...

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...hours and were made
a good deal more at home than we could have been in...

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... ...

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...the name.
4 concerning Lecce, Bergamo, Padua, Verona, Battlefield of Marengo,
...

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...Joppa, and possibly other points in the Holy Land. The
letters from Egypt, the Nile and...

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... SAM.

We leave tonight, at two o'clock in the morning.


There...

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... ...

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... "seven beautiful days" is found in The Innocents Abroad.




VIII. LETTERS 1867-68. WASHINGTON AND...

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... dignity, beauty, and power; his humor was finer, worthier. The
...

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...orders
ahead. If you have any thought of writing a book, or could be induced to
do...

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...could now write. When
those letters were written my impressions were fresh, but now they have
lost...

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...a day in the blue
harbor of Smyrna, when young Charles...

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...in a month.

I went back by invitation, after the evening service, and finished
the blow-out, and...

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... WASH. Jan. 9, 1868.

MY DEAR MOTHER AND SISTER,--That...

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...MOTHER AND SISTER,--This is a good week for me. I stopped in the
Herald office as...

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...article in the Galaxy, just
issued) but I am not going to write to this, that...

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...contracts.
But the American Publishing Company sold its books only by
...

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...upon the subscription price of the book for
all copies sold.

As further proposed by you, this...

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...personal friend of mine, the Chief Editor of the
Alta was an applicant I said I...

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... again back at his old occupation, setting type in St. Louis.
...

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...or that I had no other
writing to do.

This is the place to get a poor...

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...and preparing the copy for his book. Matters were
going...

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... ...

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... crowded house.--[See Mark Twain: A Biography, chap xlvi, and
...

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...in this letter had been something more
than a "shipmother" to...

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...engagement with James
Redpath, proprietor of the Boston Lyceum Bureau, and...

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... It would be difficult for any family to refuse relationship with...

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...a splendid girl. She spends
no money but her usual year's allowance, and she spends nearly...

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...Clemens and family, in St. Louis

...

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...dollars a year, because she produces the
documents at once to show that precious little of...

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...had promising advance orders
from their canvassers; but apparently he includes...

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...thinking men. The only centres, now, are narrowed down to those of
intelligence, capital and population....

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...thinks that's bound to settle it. But the ice & snow, &
the long hard journey,...

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...be omitted. It was sent in response to an invitation from the New
...

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...country. Assessments did the business
for me there. There were a hundred and seventeen assessments to...

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...firesides, and close
this screed with the sincere hope that your visit here will be a...

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... "Nasby" is, of course, David R. Locke, of the Toledo Blade, whose
...

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... hear what one of my fellow countrymen, who is not a...

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...you or your heirs, whenever in the future
he shall be able to do it. Now,...

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...Orion and
the rest for your letters, but you see how I am pushed--ought to have...

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... ...

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...so hard up! I published that story, and it became widely known in
America, India, China,...

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... by the Order in Sonora.

"The 'Quails'--the...

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... ...

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...first months of their marriage. Then there came a
change....

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...wanted a new book, and met Mark Twain at
Elmira to...

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... ...

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... 31, 70.

MY DEAR SISTER,--I know I ought to be thrashed for not writing you,...

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...as you please with the land--always remember this--that so
trivial a percentage as ten per cent...

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...the weight, too, I am obliged to confess. But I am doing finely,
all things considered....

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...in the
marriage ceremony. Joseph Twichell was a devout Christian,...

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...it seems a pity that you quit, for Mrs. T.
didn't mind it if I remember...

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...would
preside. However, he sent to the secretary of the...

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... "Three Aces," and signed "Carl Byng," was printed in the Express.
...

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... prevented from doing him justice, as forty-two thousand copies of
...

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...every few lines by poundings of the table
and shouts of "Splendid, by Shorzhe!" Finally, a...

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...controversy over the "Three Aces" was the beginning of
along and...

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...strength of it, so I have
turned it into the last Memoranda I shall ever write,...

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...the
idea good? The furniture is worth $10,000 or $12,000 and must not be
jammed into any...

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... ...

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...of MS
already written and am now writing 200 a week--more than that, in
fact; during the...

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...Boston:

...

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...Here goes! I wanted you to
scare Rondout off with a big price. $125 ain't big....

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... ...

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... Forest Street, a handsome place in a distinctly literary
...

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...Humorist," for my subject. Wrote it here on Friday
and Saturday, and read it from MS...

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...free man again.

...

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...the first of several hundred that would follow
in the years...

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...that
shot my dog. I want to see if he is dead to every human instinct.

Now...

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...Aug. 11, 1872.

MY DEAR BRO.--I shall sail for England in the Scotia, Aug. 21.

But what...

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...New York.




XII. LETTERS 1872-73. MARK TWAIN IN ENGLAND. LONDON HONORS. ACQUAINTANCE
WITH DR. JOHN BROWN. A...

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...too much gaiety. To Mrs. Clemens he wrote:


*****



To Mrs. Clemens, in Hartford:

...

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...Hartford:

...

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... We may believe that the "friendly support" of Sir John Bennett was
...

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...much but attend dinners and make speeches. But have had a
jolly good time and I...

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...as poorly qualified for the nation's chief
executive. He wrote:


*****



To...

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... FARMINGTON AVE, Hartford Feb. 27.

MY DEAR HOWELLS,--I am in a...

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... They also
worked rapidly, and in April the story was...

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...the telegraphic headings were:


BY TELEGRAPH

A...

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...even if annoying, incident happened about the time of
Mark Twain's...

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...makes me as mad as the very Old
Harry every time I think of Mr. Chew...

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... further engagements were canceled, and Clemens took his little
...

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...his special favorite. He named her Megalops, because of her
...

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...advertisement
which I sent you) that they won't carry dogs in these ships at any
price. This...

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...you have stopped smoking. However,
I have a strong faith that it is not too late,...

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...you and shall be powerful
glad to see you and Harmony. I am not going to...

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...John Brown, in Edinburgh:

...

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...my opinion, he doesn't exist. I was a mighty
rough, coarse, unpromising subject when Livy took...

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...delight of such a visit that kept Clemens constantly
urging its...

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...$17,000.
The lot is 85 feet front and 150 deep--long time and easy payments on
the purchase?...

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...a right to his title
when a body uses his name in a letter." Now I...

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... ...

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...had settled his mother and
sister at Fredonia, New York, and...

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...Mr. Crane says it is
only about a hundred miles this side of New York on...

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... detestation of Scott.


*****



To W. D. Howells, in Boston:

...

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...as
possible, without departing too far from literary requirements.

...

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... subscriber, while all the deadheads would stick to it and abuse...

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...up in it and so dead to anything else, that I
have fallen mighty short in...

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...big
windows, one little one, and a wide doorway (the latter opening upon
the distant town.) On...

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...the P.O. Department a blast in the papers about sending
misdirected letters of mine back to...

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...a
year--(which is but a poetical way of saying they are going to afflict
themselves with the...

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... ...

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...he was
not without doubt concerning the manuscript, and accompanied it...

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...Thursday morning "to walk to
Boston in twenty-four hours--or more. ...

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...twenty minutes to telegraph
you what I communicate in ten sends by the new way if...

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...Dublin ceased to be Dublin to him and resumed its sweeter
forgotten name of New York....

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...or four times the evening before. Ponkapog
still writes poetry, but the old-time fire has mostly...

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...us change the heading to "Piloting on the Miss
in the Old Times"--or to "Steamboating on...

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... ...

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...until
July, 1875, and take rank to-day with Mark Twain's best...

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... Yours ever,
...

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... ...

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...by the house, now, and it is mighty good to
look at.

I'm keeping you in mind,...

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...night to take it
with the tongs and blackguard it--sometimes also going so far as to
threaten...

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...me
having led you on to fix a time; I never...

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... as the post-office at that point was to be blown up. Forty-eight
...

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...mother, or sister, had written, suggesting that he encourage his
brother's efforts, he felt moved to...

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...I can do that. I can do it every day
and all day long. But one...

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...will be southward and
so they must give us a visit on the way." I do...

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... ...

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... American Claimant,' which he wrote years later, had little or no
...

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...word. But in that early time there were no
Sunday...

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... ...

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... today as it was forty years ago-as it will be a hundred...

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...with motto and initials) from
Lizzie; a rattling mob of Sunday clad dolls from Livy and...

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...a train to Lexington; saw everything
there; traveled on top of a train to Boston, (with...

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... Yrs ever,
...

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... in the letter that follows. Whether the plan suggested
...

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... ...

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...little over five weeks ago--so I had long ago concluded
that Bliss didn't want the machine...

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...its beautiful handwriting--after I've had a man out from the agent's
...

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...If I could do as well, here, and there, with
mine, it might possibly pay me,...

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... of temptation.


*****



To W. D. Howells, in Boston:

...

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... exception of the frog story and the "True Story" most of
...

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...18, 1875.

MY DEAR HOWELLS,--My plan is this--you are to get Mr. Lowell and Mr.
Longfellow to...

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...in November--telegraphs
that Beecher's and Nast's withdrawal has put him in the tightest kind of
a place....

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...they
always leave a small pang behind in the shape of a fear that the
critic's good...

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... Yrs Ever
...

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...more for personating that
drunken Col. James. I "caught it" for mentioning that Mr. Longfellow's
picture was...

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... She had doubts as to certain portions of it, and had the fullest
...

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...do jumble words together; and how often I do use three words
where one would answer--a...

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...story, on account of the
misery of having to do it all over again. We--all send...

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... HARTFORD, November 27, 1875.

Livy...