Mark Twain's Letters — Volume 1 (1853-1866)

By Mark Twain

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...MARK TWAIN'S LETTERS--1853-1866

ARRANGED WITH COMMENT BY ALBERT BIGELOW PAINE

VOLUME I


By Mark Twain




FOREWORD

Nowhere is the human...

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...judge Clemens, as he was usually
called, optimistic and speculative in his temperament, believed in
its future....

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...New York,
where a World's Fair was then going on. In New York he found
employment at...

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...a company of young fellows who were
recruiting with the avowed purpose of "throwing off the...

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...Nevada law, which regarded even a challenge or its
acceptance as a felony, was an inducement...

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...rain. Clemens, however, protested,
and declared that each pail of water was his last. Finally he...

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...precarious livelihood doing
miscellaneous work, until March, 1866, when he was employed by the
Sacramento Union to...

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...New York he met Frank Fuller,
whom he had known as territorial Governor of Utah, an...

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...and it was for
this reason that as time passed he frequently sojourned there. When the
proofs...

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...Clemens hurried back to London alone to deliver a notable series of
lectures under the management...

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...copies were sold to
pay a royalty of more than four hundred thousand dollars to Grant's
widow--the...

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...he would never
appear before an audience again. Yet, in 1895, when he was sixty years
old,...

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...were planned in his honor.

In a house at 14 West Tenth Street, and in a...

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...little girl's remark. His daily speech was full
of such things. The secret of his great...

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...said, when he had
looked at her. "I always envy the dead."

The coveted estate of silence,...

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...of those
smudgy, much-folded school notes of the Tom Sawyer period...

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... complete, and the fragment bears no date, but it was written during
...

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...Office and the Broadway office too, are out of my
way, and I always go to...

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... He had gone on the river to learn
piloting with...

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...existing
letter--also to Sister Pamela--was written in October. It is
...

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...have a brother nearly eighteen years of age, who is not able
to take care of...

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... to Fairmount Park is omitted because of its length, its chief
...

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...the first of next April, (when I shall return home
to take Ma to Ky;) and...

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... ...

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... ...

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... PHILADELPHIA, Nov....

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... Yet
these seem now rather striking. Like Franklin, he...

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...but it is too late now. I don't
like our present prospect for cold weather at...

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...period now of nearly four years, when Samuel Clemens
was either...

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...KEOKUK, Iowa, June 10th, 1856.

MY DEAR MOTHER & SISTER,--I have nothing to write. Everything is
going...

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...have been rather happy in Keokuk. There were
plenty of...

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...ten dollars, so I have "feelers" out in several directions, and
have already asked for a...

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...trade. No letters have been preserved from that time, except two
...

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... It is at this point that the letters begin once more--the...

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...half an hour, and landed on an island till the Pennsylvania came
along and took us...

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...so, if you never get richer. I seldom venture to think about
our landed wealth, for...

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... the American Arctic explorer. Any book of exploration always
...

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... and the strain of watching, yet the anguish of it is...

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...bring
me to Saint Louis. Had another pilot been found, poor Brown would have
been the "lucky"...

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...after Henry.


It is said that Mark Twain never really recovered...

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...one will know it
but yourself.

Above all things (between you and me) never tell Ma any...

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...so far ahead of them. Permit me to "blow my horn," for I
derive a living...

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...time to
moralize this morning.

...

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...has ever seen--Church's "Heart of the
Andes"--which represents a lovely valley with its rich vegetation in...

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...which is commonly ignored in polite society, they were
"hell-bent" on stealing some of the luscious-looking...

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... "ALONZO CHILD," N....

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... ...

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...long struggle under a
mask of cheerfulness, which saved your friends anxiety on your account.
To do...

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...fussing about change, so I sent them a hundred and twenty
quarters yesterday--fiddler's change enough to...

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...period. Young Clemens went
to Hannibal, and enlisting in a...

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... (Date not given, but Sept, or Oct., 1861.)

MY...

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...it had wandered
into the country without intending it, and had run about in a bewildered
way...

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...not interested in mining not
yet. With a boy named...

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...way to within 4 or 5 steps of us on the
South side. We looked like...

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...there, down the shore. We found the way without any trouble,
reached there before sundown, played...

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... Love to the young folks,

...

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...whenever I think of it I want to go there and die, the
place is so...

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...say anything about our
prospects now, if we were nearer home. But I suppose at this...

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...slave
several times in my life, but I'll never be one again. I always intend
to be...

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...George Pamela, I begin to fear that
I have invoked a Spirit of some kind or...

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...struck, which bids fair to become a "big thing" by the
time the ledge is reached--sufficient...

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... "In the...

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...thousand dollars! But you can easily fix him. You tell him that
you'll build a quartz...

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...am saying, mind you, that Margaret wouldn't
like the country, perhaps--nor the devil either, for that...

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...then you ought
to have raised me first, so that Orion could have had the benefit...

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...been received. I see I am
in for it again--with Annie. But she ought to know...

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... ...

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...Indians. They had a pitched
battle with the savages some fifty miles from the fort, in...

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...and he would have a stylish office, and no
objections would ever be made, either. When...

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...heart, and confidence in his
associates still unshaken. Later he...

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...than a man, if he can't wait 2 years for a fortune?" When
you and I...

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...at big
wages, the same to be free of expense to the Government. You want the
entire...

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...to California--provided the trip didn't kill her.

You see Bixby is on the flag-ship. He always...

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...and shovel, Raish gave me your specimen--said Bagley
brought it, and asked me if it were...

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...that which was sunk in it by unfortunate investors. Only
...

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...with thumb and finger from "Wide West"
ledge awhile ago. Raish and I have secured 200...

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...D. being worth from $30 to $50 in Cal. It pleases
me because, if the ledges...

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... ...

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...thought for; I bought $25 worth of clothing,
and sent $25 to Higbie, in the cement...

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... had converted it into one of the most important--certainly the most
...

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...through you.

The Contractors say they will strike the Fresno next week. After fooling
with those assayers...

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... ...

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...cherished intention and the darling aspiration every year, of
these old care-worn Californians for twelve weary...

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...living. We preached our doctrine and practised
it. Which course I respectfully recommend to the clergymen...

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...he would at least make the letters picturesque.

It was in...

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...writing up my report for
the morning paper, and giving the Unreliable a column of advice...

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...S. I have just heard five pistol shots down street--as such things
are in my line,...

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...without rocking, every night. We dine out and we lunch out, and we
eat, drink and...

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... ...

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...am
having a very comfortable time of it. The hot, white steam puffs up out
of fissures...

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...more promise, Goodman
thought, of future distinction.

...

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...matter of which I spoke to you
so earnestly shall be just as earnestly attended to--and...

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... Always...

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... a dandy in dress, and no occasion was complete without him....

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...who heard it
regarded it as a classic. It probably...

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... ...

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...rather tired of Virginia City
and Carson, thought it a good...

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...lighted, and yet
summer clothes are never worn--you wear spring clothing the year round.

Steve Gillis, who...

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...could not accept, on account of my
contract to act as chief mourner or groomsman at...

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...a year there is not a line that has survived. Yet it
...

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...to the
Saturday Press when they found it was too late for the book.

Though I am...

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...only decided today to go, and they have already
sent me letters of introduction to everybody...

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...there are on the face of the deep
...

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... ...

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... ...

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... HONOLULU, SANDWICH ISLANDS, June 21,1866.

MY DEAR MOTHER AND SISTER,--I have just got back...

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...for California at
once. But he will not arrive for two weeks yet and so I...

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... HONOLULU, June 27, 1866

... with a gill of water a day...

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...notable.
Re-reading those old letters to-day it is not altogether easy...

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...small assortment
of medicinal liquors and brandy, several boxes of cigars, a bunch of
matches, a fine-toothed...

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...king, or rather, that he'd got hold of the king's driver,
or a carriage driver of...

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...he says, "that swathe the stately tamarind right
before my door,...

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...savor of his subsequent work, but, as a
rule, the humor...

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...it had outshone its regal neighbor, the palace of the
king,...

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... Their ship, the Hornet, from New York, with a
quantity...

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...City, eighteen and
twenty-eight years, are still at Hilo, but are expected here within the
week. In...

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...twelve days ago--I don't know which, I have been so hard at
work until today (at...

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...sunsets. And
the ship is so easy--even in a gale she rolls very little, compared to
other...

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...so we could
faintly see persons on her decks. We had two minutes' chat with each
other,...

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...of fire and in the midst of a sea of blood.

San Francisco, Aug. 20.--We never...

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...Friends urged him to embody in a lecture the picturesque aspect of
...

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...San Francisco again, and again
here if I have time to re-hash the lecture.

Then I am...

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...Dr. Stone. I am running on
preachers, now, altogether. I find them gay. Stebbings is a...

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...sketches, including the jumping Frog story, in book form. Webb
...

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... which would be a few days after the appearance of Webb's book.
...