Mark Twain's Letters — Complete (1853-1910)

By Mark Twain

Page 0

...MARK TWAIN'S LETTERS--1853-1910

ARRANGED WITH COMMENT BY ALBERT BIGELOW PAINE


VOLUME I-VI, COMPLETE


By Mark Twain


*****



MARK TWAIN'S LETTERS--1853-1866

ARRANGED...

Page 1

...town then, a mere village of twenty-one
houses located on Salt River, but judge Clemens, as...

Page 2

...that he was going to St. Louis, but he kept on to New York,
where a...

Page 3

...sympathies were with the South. He hurried up
to Hannibal and enlisted with a company of...

Page 4

...the Sierras to San Francisco. The duel turned out farcically
enough, but the Nevada law, which...

Page 5

...Gillis, possessed with the mining passion,
would have gone on, regardless of the rain. Clemens, however,...

Page 6

...yield heavy financial return. Its
author continued to win a more or less precarious livelihood doing
miscellaneous...

Page 7

...there in good season for
the sailing date, which was in June. In New York he...

Page 8

...her in New
York on his return. The Langdon home was in Elmira, and it was...

Page 9

...of the
year in England and Scotland. They returned to America in November,
and Clemens hurried back...

Page 10

...Charles L. Webster in the
publication of the Grant Memoirs, of which enough copies were sold...

Page 11

...during the winter of
1884-85, but he abominated the platform, and often vowed he would never
appear...

Page 12

...national event.
Wherever he appeared throngs turned out to bid him welcome. Mighty
banquets were planned in...

Page 13

...young can afford it," he once said to
the writer, apropos of a little girl's remark....

Page 14

...that had been released.

"I never greatly envied anybody but the dead," he said, when he...

Page 15

... or otherwise, with happy or disastrous results. One of those
...

Page 16

...visit to this great exhibition. It is not
complete, and...

Page 17

...Will and Captain Bowen. I shall write to Will soon. The
Chatham-square Post Office and the...

Page 18

...former playmate, one of
Tom Sawyer's outlaw band. He had...

Page 19

... written more than once during this period, but the next existing
...

Page 20

...not come often, you need not bother yourself about me;
for if you have a brother...

Page 21

...was still in Hannibal. An extended description of a trip
...

Page 22

...office. One man has engaged me to work for
him every Sunday till the first of...

Page 23

... "Benjamin |
...

Page 24

...is going on in H--l.

...

Page 25

... ...

Page 26

... resemblance between the great Franklin's career and his own. Yet
...

Page 27

...in the Union. I wanted to
spend this winter in a warm climate, but it is...

Page 28

...THE RIVER. END OF PILOTING

There comes a period now of...

Page 29

... KEOKUK, Iowa, June...

Page 30

... He seems, on the
whole, however, to have been rather...

Page 31

...a hundred dollars in six weeks, I could not depend upon him
for ten dollars, so...

Page 32

...in Cincinnati that winter (1856-57) working at his
trade. No...

Page 33

...association pilot and apprentice disliked
each other cordially.

...

Page 34

...and tried it again. This time we found the channel in less
than half an hour,...

Page 35

...in such high spirits about the land, and I hope you
will remain so, if you...

Page 36

...Doctor Kane of this letter is, of course, Dr. Elisha Kent Kane,
...

Page 37

...that follows shows that he was overwrought by the scenes about him
...

Page 38

...me to the A. T. Lacey, with orders to her Captain to bring
me to Saint...

Page 39

... SAML. L. CLEMENS.

P. S. I got here two days after Henry.


...

Page 40

...meddlers, until the
latter are consummated, so that in case you fail, no one will know...

Page 41

...river cannot keep from showing a little of their chagrin
at seeing me so far ahead...

Page 42

...as an army with banners."

Aunt Betsey--the wickedness of this world--but I haven't time to
moralize this...

Page 43

...returned from a visit to the most wonderfully
beautiful painting which this city has ever seen--Church's...

Page 44

...a blazing hot dusty day, they seemed hugely delighted. To use
an expression which is commonly...

Page 45

... ...

Page 46

...to Orion Clemens, in Keokuk, Iowa:

...

Page 47

...you keep such matters to
yourself--but you fought your way, and hid the long struggle under...

Page 48

...let Ma know, and she will send it. She and Pamela
are always fussing about change,...

Page 49

...conflict.

There are no letters of this immediate period. Young...

Page 50

... ...

Page 51

...wide, knee deep, and
so villainously rapid and crooked, that it looks like it had wandered
into...

Page 52

...and in
prospecting native resources. He was not interested in...

Page 53

...of drift wood within six feet of
our boat, and had made its way to within...

Page 54

...out for the only house on this side of the Lake--three miles
from there, down the...

Page 55

... ...

Page 56

...among
the inhabitants of that region. I had better stop about "the Lake,"
though,--for whenever I think...

Page 57

...my skirts of the possibility
of having my judgment criticised. I would not say anything about...

Page 58

...Benson I never intend to be a lawyer. I have been a slave
several times in...

Page 59

... CARSON CITY, Feb. 8, 1862.

MY DEAR MOTHER AND SISTER,--By George Pamela, I...

Page 60

...tunnel is in 52 feet, and a small stream
of water has been struck, which bids...

Page 61

...control"
were to prevent my being present at my own funeral. But--but--

...

Page 62

...the face and tell you his little property is worth forty
or fifty thousand dollars! But...

Page 63

...go back to hell again. But I hardly
believe it, you know. I am saying, mind...

Page 64

...what
you could do in that line when you raised me, Madam. But then you ought
to...

Page 65

...CARSON CITY, April 2, 1862.

MY DEAR MOTHER,--Yours of March 2nd has just been received. I...

Page 66

... ...

Page 67

...and ammunition, which they left
behind them, fell into the hands of the Indians. They had...

Page 68

...keeping your office in a shanty. Says
put Gov. Nye in your place and he would...

Page 69

... Hope is
still high in the writer's heart, and confidence...

Page 70

..."No--d---n your 'prospects,' I wait on a sure thing--and a man
is less than a man,...

Page 71

...pay,
the whole to be kept in parlor order by two likely contrabands at big
wages, the...

Page 72

...Pamela never will regain her health, but she could
improve it by coming to California--provided the...

Page 73

...the other evening, hungry and tired and ill-natured, and
threw down my pick and shovel, Raish...

Page 74

..."blind lead" of the Wide West claim,
except that which was...

Page 75

...you, per next mail, a pinch of decom.
(decomposed rock) which I pinched with thumb and...

Page 76

...your letter, I say, pleases me exceedingly. Especially
that about the H. and D. being worth...

Page 77

... ...

Page 78

...the Ophir can't beat the Johnson any.....

My debts are greater than I thought for; I...

Page 79

... Comstock silver-mining boom, and from a struggling, starving sheet
had...

Page 80

...he should want me he must write
me here, or let me know through you.

The Contractors...

Page 81

...Yr. Bro.
...

Page 82

...home this fall--but when I found that that was and had
been the cherished intention and...

Page 83

...we said wise and severe things about the vanity
and wickedness of high living. We preached...

Page 84

...that while Clemens knew nothing of parliamentary
procedure, he would at...

Page 85

...statements were, but I suppose they
were mining statistics. I have just finished writing up my...

Page 86

...Gold Hill. They were a very pleasant lot of girls--she and
her sisters.

P. S. I have...

Page 87

...to Washoe. We fag ourselves completely out every day, and go to
sleep without rocking, every...

Page 88

...St. Louis:

No. 12--$20 enclosed.

...

Page 89

...at the Springs is not so much crowded as usual, and I am
having a very...

Page 90

..."Dan
de Quille," a graceful humorist, gave far more promise, Goodman
...

Page 91

...only
chastely-humorous writer onto the Pacific slopes.

Good-bye, old boy--and God bless you! The matter of which...

Page 92

... ...

Page 93

...of miners of a year before he had become, once more, almost
...

Page 94

...address,
unfortunately, has not been preserved, but those who heard it
...

Page 95

... ...

Page 96

...accept
a challenge. Clemens, on the whole, rather tired of...

Page 97

...three years. Here
we have neither snow nor cold weather; fires are never lighted, and yet
summer...

Page 98

...Mexico, to be gone six or eight
weeks, or possibly longer, but I could not accept,...

Page 99

...had very little to say.

For more than a year there...

Page 100

...press."

The New York publishing house of Carleton & Co. gave the sketch to the
Saturday Press...

Page 101

...days. My friends seem determined that I shall not lack
acquaintances, for I only decided today...

Page 102

...again:

"Oh, Islands there are on...

Page 103

... SAM.



To Mrs. Jane Clemens and Mrs. Moffett, in St. Louis:

...

Page 104

...affy
...

Page 105

... HONOLULU,...

Page 106

...his views on this new
condition of Sandwich Island politics, I would sail for California at
once....

Page 107

... ...

Page 108

... were regarded by the readers of the Union as distinctly notable.
...

Page 109

...me began with
a naval uniform, continued with a case of wine, a small assortment
of medicinal...

Page 110

...these notes when Cap. Fitch discovered that he'd got hold
of the wrong king, or rather,...

Page 111

...looking into the rich mass of
green leaves," he says, "that...

Page 112

...Cap. Cook came."

This bit has something the savor of his...

Page 113

...thirty to forty thousand dollars.
In its day it had outshone...

Page 114

...sea, in an open boat, for
forty-three days. Their ship,...

Page 115

...named Antonio Passene, and two
passengers, Samuel and Henry Ferguson, of New York City, eighteen and
twenty-eight...

Page 116

...to interest you much. We left the Sandwich Islands eight or
ten days--or twelve days ago--I...

Page 117

...day. But
I enjoy it. We have such snowy moonlight, and such gorgeous sunsets. And
the ship...

Page 118

...show in the
luminous starlight. She passed within a hundred yards of us, so we could
faintly...

Page 119

...sets--beautiful. She looks sharply cut and black as a coal,
against a background of fire and...

Page 120

...of the Hornet Shipwreck story encouraged this thought.

Friends urged him...

Page 121

...I am going to talk in Carson,
Gold Hill, Silver City, Dayton, Washoe, San Francisco again,...

Page 122

...Rev. Stebbings, and I am
laying for the Rev. Scudder and the Rev. Dr. Stone. I...

Page 123

...edited, came the proposal to collect his published
sketches, including the...

Page 124

...Union for the venture. He timed it for May 6th,
...

Page 125

... ...

Page 126

... now. In a little while he would sail, and the days were
...

Page 127

...influence. But send on the professional preachers--there
are none I like better to converse with. If...

Page 128

... Sacramento Union. Nothing came of the venture, except some chapters
...

Page 129

...if I
could almost answer the question myself--which is to say in plain words,
I was afraid...

Page 130

...descriptive relations of
travel which would make him his first great...

Page 131

... Yrs.
...

Page 132

... ...

Page 133

...to try it. They said, no difference--the Emperor
would hardly visit our ship, because that would...

Page 134

...it warmly that I begin to imagine it must be a
wonderful sort of document and...

Page 135

... CONSTANTINOPLE, Sept. 1, '67.

DEAR FOLKS,--All well. Do the Alta's come...

Page 136

...not done with
Turkey yet. Shall write 2 or 3 more.

I have...

Page 137

...to the Dead Sea, the Cave of
Macpelah and up to Joppa where the ship will...

Page 138

...be picked up at Cadiz.

Later: We cannot anchor--must go on. We shall be at Gibraltar...

Page 139

...and will arrive in New York ten days after this
letter gets there.

...

Page 140

...1867, Mark
Twain found himself no longer unknown to the metropolis,...

Page 141

...forward to you, not
knowing your arrival home was expected so soon. We are desirous of
obtaining...

Page 142

...of Nov. 21st last night, at the
rooms of the Tribune Bureau here. It was forwarded...

Page 143

... The exchange of these two letters marked the beginning of one of the
...

Page 144

...sent the old folks home early, with instructions not to send the
carriage till midnight, and...

Page 145

...the arrival of the
Quaker City in New York, he had...

Page 146

... ...

Page 147

...it, and a good deal of it. I told them so. I
had the misfortune to...

Page 148

...ten thousand
dollars, cash in hand, or a 5-per-cent. royalty on...

Page 149

...with MSS sufficient for a
volume of 500 to 600 pages, the subject to be the...

Page 150

... office or another tempted him, but he wisely, or luckily, resisted.
...

Page 151

... Love to all

...

Page 152

...all other bosh,--that is, literature wherewith to
please the general public.

I shall write to please myself,...

Page 153

... in order to bring Mark to terms; but this was because the author...

Page 154

...and San
Francisco less than two weeks later. I worry a great deal about being
obliged to...

Page 155

... ...

Page 156

...from California.
Then, through young Charles Langdon, his Quaker City shipmate,...

Page 157

... ...

Page 158

...second and third
tiers--and when the last seat was gone the box office had not been...

Page 159

...like him to want to give us a start in life. But I don't
want it...

Page 160

... It has been stated that Mark Twain loved the lecture platform, but
...

Page 161

...winter, and probably shan't. I most cordially hate
the lecture field. And after all, I shudder...

Page 162

... Affectionately,
...

Page 163

...all the time and St. Louis is
clear out of the way, and remote from the...

Page 164

...proofs were finished. Write me if it
is not yet done.

Livy says we must have you...

Page 165

...for the remainder. He was
already in possession in August,...

Page 166

...feed me. My claims in
Esmeralda are there yet. I suppose I could be persuaded to...

Page 167

...mill, with all its "dips, spurs and
angles, variations and sinuosities." I have worked there at...

Page 168

...to save money for the
government, had employed methods and agents...

Page 169

..."When I read that review of yours I felt like the woman who
...

Page 170

...If they make his sureties pay, then I will make the
sureties whole, but I won't...

Page 171

...am twenty-two thousand dollars in debt, and shall earn the money
and pay it within two...

Page 172

...success of it that has ever been made with
a subscription book, I believe. What with...

Page 173

...shouldn't--for right
in the depths of their poverty and their pocket-hunting vagabondage
lay the germ of my...

Page 174

... "Dick Stoker--dear, gentle unselfish old Dick-died over three years
ago,...

Page 175

... ...

Page 176

...and some of his best work at this
time was published...

Page 177

... SAM.

P. S. I sent...

Page 178

...The "biggest copyright," mentioned in this letter, was a royalty of
...

Page 179

... Mr. Langdon died early in August, and Mrs. Clemens returned to
...

Page 180

... ...

Page 181

... ...

Page 182

... ...

Page 183

...something. He is a patient, good little
baby.

Smoke? I always smoke from 3 till 5 Sunday...

Page 184

...far away. Later, he had found a position for Orion,
...

Page 185

... In this letter Mark Twain made the usual mistake as to the title...

Page 186

...a fair
justice without any unseemly display. But it is hard to be accused of
plagiarism--a crime...

Page 187

...worth its face, seeing that Bret broke our long friendship a
year ago without any cause...

Page 188

...than inspiration itself.

Once more I apologize, and this time I do it "stanning!"

...

Page 189

...general. Journalism and authorship are poor yoke-mates. To
Onion...

Page 190

...a job, I can tell you, but the book
will be greatly bettered by it. Hold...

Page 191

...the new book progressed in consequence. Then Mark Twain's old
...

Page 192

...cents whether
school keeps or not. It will be a bully book. If I keep up...

Page 193

...that he agreed with
Redpath to return to the platform that...

Page 194

... ...

Page 195

...always was too many for me. It appears to me to be one of the
finest...

Page 196

...and decided that we can't
possibly talk after Feb. 2.

We shall take up our residence in...

Page 197

...shimmer of wit from Aldrich, of an occasional concentration of our
...

Page 198

...2, 1872.

FRIEND REDPATH,--Had a splendid time with a splendid audience in
Indianapolis last night--a perfectly jammed...

Page 199

... Twain, free of debt, and in pleasant circumstances, felt that the
...

Page 200

...none go away that are not softened and
humbled and made more resigned to the will...

Page 201

... He had also conceived the idea of another book of travel, and this
...

Page 202

... ...

Page 203

...his early
work, had reprinted, under the name of Mark Twain,...

Page 204

...and privately report something of his
triumphs we need not wonder...

Page 205

...conversing
in a whisper with his neighbor, Sir John Bennett, did...

Page 206

... In a letter home, to his mother and sister, we get a...

Page 207

... ...

Page 208

...and it is due to one of
these special engagements that...

Page 209

...challenged by their wives one night at
dinner to write a...

Page 210

...I am not going to stay, when I do
go.

Yes, it is true. I am only...

Page 211

...things when a man is your friend?

...

Page 212

...the same time strongly tempted to sue him into the
bargain for coming so near ruining...

Page 213

...Letters are exceedingly scarce through all this period. Mark Twain,
...

Page 214

...more name or fame than the
Yorkshire boy who is loitering down this street this moment.

...

Page 215

...And yet you are so present with us, so
close to us that a span and...

Page 216

...any other
platform record to match it. One letter of...

Page 217

...the way he makes animals absolute flesh and blood--insomuch
that if the room were darkened ever...

Page 218

... ...

Page 219

...the sale will ultimately go over
100,000 copies.

I shipped to you, from Liverpool, Barley's Illustrations of...

Page 220

... There was
constant running in and out of friendly houses,...

Page 221

...ever
...

Page 222

...from here--it never
gets hot up there.

Mrs. Clemens is pretty strong, and so is the "little...

Page 223

...the law.


It was a historic summer at the Farm. ...

Page 224

...rain beats upon the roof over my head, imagine the luxury of it! It
stands 500...

Page 225

...had hinted that they wished to visit
Livy when she came, but that she had given...

Page 226

...Acquaintance' when 'A Foregone Conclusion'
appeared. For the reason that...

Page 227

...Howells was editor of the Atlantic by this time, and had been urging
...

Page 228

...another place added, "This little story
delights me more and more....

Page 229

...a
year.


*****



To Dr. John Brown, in Edinburgh:

...

Page 230

...ought to be able to go to work again on the book. We
shall reach Hartford...

Page 231

...happy and grateful memory.

...

Page 232

...discrepancies in other words--and when you come to reproduce
them on paper they look as if...

Page 233

... repaid for their entertainment.




XIV. LETTERS 1874. MISSISSIPPI CHAPTERS. VISITS TO BOSTON. A...

Page 234

... ...

Page 235

...been made of Mark Twain's walk with Twichell.
Frequently their walks...

Page 236

...still call this beloved old place by the name
it had when I was young. Limerick!...

Page 237

...remember their faces,
and they ours. In a moment, they came tottering in; he, bent and
withered...

Page 238

...monument to the author of "Gloverson and His Silent partners" is
finished. It is the stateliest...

Page 239

...forecast in it is not wholly lacking.

Clemens was now pretty...

Page 240

... ...

Page 241

...Through the infinite grace of God there
has not been such another insurrection in the family...

Page 242

...was intended for n-not; but I guess I shall
make some sort of a succss of...

Page 243

...Parker House and tell lies and have an improving time, and
take breakfast with me in...

Page 244

...was reading it at home and forthwith
fell upon me with a burst of enthusiasm about...

Page 245

... ...

Page 246

... it and take Howells with him. Howells was willing enough to go and
...

Page 247

...perpetrator of the
outrage to be known to the police; that...

Page 248

...Yet, his fear of incurring his brother's displeasure
was pitiful, regardless of the fact that he...

Page 249

...aggravates me so much as to have Orion
mention law or literature to me.

Well, I cannot...

Page 250

...with Mrs. Howells for a brief time in March,
he said....

Page 251

...was able
to read the English edition of the Greville Memoirs through without
interruption, take my meals...

Page 252

...of Charles Warren
Stoddard, whom Mark Twain had known in his...

Page 253

...in this letter, furnishes us with a realizing sense of the
...

Page 254

...really
understands art comes along and damns it. But I don't mind. I would
rather have my...

Page 255

...to proceed in the
matter.

...

Page 256

...a better "holt"
for kissing--which Susie presently perceived, and became thoughtful:
then said sorrowfully, turning the great...

Page 257

...this letter was Howells's daughter
Winifred. She had unusual gifts,...

Page 258

...protesting.

The spring laziness is already upon me--insomuch that the spirit begins
to move me to cease...

Page 259

...believed to be
his literary limitations. All his life he was...

Page 260

...that justice.

Shan't I write him and say he may call? If you wish to communicate
directly...

Page 261

... ...

Page 262

...on me. Of course, it doesn't work: if I can
...

Page 263

...the
Atlantic--about what the Foregone Conclusion made, isn't it?

I would dearly like to see it in...

Page 264

... ...

Page 265

...ready to read
the story, whenever it should arrive. Clemens...

Page 266

...of
foreign books. It was a rather utopian scheme, as...

Page 267

...outlives the present copyright
term--no sort of use except that the writer of that one book...

Page 268

... brought grateful acknowledgment from the author.


*****



To W. D. Howells, in Boston:

...

Page 269

...take her to Cambridge. But I will do her
the justice to say that she is...

Page 270

...from household and nursery cares. I do hope that Mrs. Howells's
didn't go correspondingly down, under...

Page 271

...member of the household--a most picturesque
character, who "one day came...

Page 272

...to send something to the Atlantic, declaring a
willingness to have...

Page 273

...chapter, I think of just leaving it off
and adding nothing in its place. Something told...

Page 274

...this, and was willing to yield, was by no means the
...

Page 275

...BRET HARTE.

The Monday Evening Club of Hartford was an association...

Page 276

...spent 3
more days trimming, altering and working at it. I shall put in one more
day's...

Page 277

...Clemens answered:


*****



To W. D. Howells, in Boston.

...

Page 278

...for it was the
most natural remark in the world for that boy to make (and...

Page 279

... ...

Page 280

...you have evidently read and
corrected it, and so I judge you do not need it....

Page 281

...a regular "Mark Twain"
notion, and it is hard to-day to...

Page 282

...Canton. Clemens said
that when he took the Jumping Frog...

Page 283

...delaying Tom, till I
ease him down to Autumn without shock to the waiting world.

As to...

Page 284

...when she
was but fifteen years old, when her success as...

Page 285

...Because you would know all about where my weak
points lay. No, Sir, I'm one of...

Page 286

...neighbors. It is the
quietest of all quiet places, and we are hermits that eschew caves...

Page 287

...obscene postal cards, either, but reverently,
upon paper.

I shall read that biography, though the letter of...

Page 288

...don't know whether
this weird and astounding spectacle most suggested heaven, or hell.
The wonder, with its...

Page 289

..."There is not another man in this country," he said, "who
...

Page 290

...see?
And if you wish to use it, will you set it up now, and send...

Page 291

... Some years afterward a West
Point officer had a special...

Page 292

...in and pile foul literature all
over them four or five inches deep, and the lover...

Page 293

...next letter we get the
beginning of what proved his first...

Page 294

...a note-paper page and send the same to
me, with Bill. We don't want anybody to...

Page 295

... HARTFORD, Nov. 1, 1876.

MY DEAR BURROUGHS,--As you describe me I can picture myself as...

Page 296

...letter
like that from a grown man and he a widower with a family, it gives...

Page 297

...not always a pleasant
one. He was full of requirements,...

Page 298

...the matter with it; perhaps a
very small change at the...

Page 299

...table
and went away. It was a great pity all round, and a great loss to...

Page 300

...the success of the
excursion.


*****



To W. D. Howells, in Boston:

...

Page 301

... Yrs ever
...

Page 302

... ...

Page 303

...some cold villain like Lathrop
read and pass sentence on them. Mind, I thought they were...

Page 304

... undertaken to doctor the play, and it would seem to have had an
...

Page 305

...beyond question, is a matter which makes it proper enough that I
should speak through you...

Page 306

...nights as in the
first ten of Sellers. Haven't heard from the third--I came away.

...

Page 307

...Howells, in Boston:

...

Page 308

...29, 1877.

MY DEAR HOWELLS,--Just got your letter last night. No, dern that
article,--[One of the Bermuda...

Page 309

...of the man traveling 8 days in convoy and familiar
intercourse with a band of outlaws...

Page 310

... The Clemens family was still at Quarry Farm at the end of August,
...

Page 311

...excitement before? Good
excitable, inflammable material?

Lewis was still down town, three miles away, with his two-horse...

Page 312

..."Just so--they are staring
petrified at the remains."

But when I got amongst that bunch, there sat...

Page 313

...very complimentary
letters, and more or less greenbacks of dignified denomination pinned to
these letters and fly-leaves,--and...

Page 314

...beforehand, if this would be a wise gift, and I said "Yes,
the very wisest of...

Page 315

...1877.

MY DEAR HOWELLS,--I don't really see how the story of the runaway horse
could read well...

Page 316

... ...

Page 317

...letter continues]

Call the gross receipts $100,000 for four months and a half, and the
profit from...

Page 318

...sufficiently
peevish to abandon a worthy enterprise.


*****



To an Entertainment Committee, in...

Page 319

...suddenly tear up the contract and then turn
and bowl me down from long range as...

Page 320

...to do their part as yourself
our poor would not want...

Page 321

...him, but presently the company melted
out of the doors and...

Page 322

...are going to help and not hurt us many a
year...

Page 323

...doing nothing. It seemed an intrusion to approach him, and even
Livy seemed to have her...

Page 324

...length the impression it had
made on herself and other members...

Page 325

...my time bothering over answers. There are other
things also that help to consume my time...

Page 326

...wicked."

Clemens replied promptly, urging a visit to Hartford, adding a
...

Page 327

... Sincerely yours
...

Page 328

...of apprentice literature than there is for the very best of
journey-work. This work of yours...

Page 329

...think of some way of
"doing" hell too--and have always had to give it up. Hell,...

Page 330

...hand writing representing
Miller's. Keep yourself out of sight till you make a strike on your...

Page 331

...powers had heard of that desolating
struggle.)

And I have told her how beautiful you are in...

Page 332

...in his story
for criticism. When you write him, please tell him to do the best...

Page 333

... boss who takes him in hand and teaches him the right way to...

Page 334

...silk, too, by George.

The times and times I wish you were along! You could throw...

Page 335

... SCHLOSS-HOTEL HEIDELBERG,

...

Page 336

...in the groves, and the muffled music of the Neckar, tumbling over
the opposing dykes. It...

Page 337

...regular, steady work, and stick to it till middle of July or
1st August, when I...

Page 338

...to follow at
their leisure. To Mrs. Clemens her husband...

Page 339

...where one sees
the foot path on the other side of the ravine, then we crossed...

Page 340

...long day's rest,
first. I love you, sweetheart.

...

Page 341

...by such a gracious surprise, if she,
instead of I, had seen it. So I plucked...

Page 342

... SAML.


This, as far as...

Page 343

...see a horse pull hard."

After the walk over Gemmi Pass he wrote: "Mark to-day was...

Page 344

... ...

Page 345

... ...

Page 346

... Care Fraulein Dahlweiner.

...

Page 347

...with our beer and my pipe, and in a condition
of grateful snugness tackled the new...

Page 348

...She is sorely
badgered with dreams; and her stock dream is that she is being eaten
up...

Page 349

... No. 1a...

Page 350

... ...

Page 351

...perfection now we are not able to see
what is lacking. It is all such truth--truth...

Page 352

...go handsomely into a play afterwards. How deliciously you could
paint him--it would make fascinating reading--the...

Page 353

... MUNICH, Jan 26...

Page 354

...fury subsided
and the ridiculous features of the thing began to suggest themselves.
So I lay on...

Page 355

...I want to tell Frank Bliss and his father to be
charitable toward me in,--that is,...

Page 356

...yet. Alp calleth unto Alp!--that
stately old Scriptural wording is the right one for God's Alps...

Page 357

...Talented, trusting,
child-like, carried away by the impulse of the moment,...

Page 358

...said that
for many months (it runs in my mind that he said 13 years,) he...

Page 359

...of
mine paid his interest quarterly, and this enabled me to use my capital
twice in 6...

Page 360

...a rabid part in a prayer-meeting epidemic; dropped
that to travesty Jules Verne; dropped that, in...

Page 361

...as a yardstick. I don't
feel like girding at you any more about fickleness of purpose,...

Page 362

...He was of
steadfast purpose, and he possessed the driving power...

Page 363

...had!
We thought we knew what sharp razors were when we were tramping in
Switzerland, but it...

Page 364

...frontpiece, which, from time to time, has
caused question as to...

Page 365

...and we were at last obliged to give up
the idea of seeing you at all....

Page 366

...work on it at Quarry Farm. When, after a few days no word
...

Page 367

...always inventing something, and losing a limb by
a new kind of explosion at the end...

Page 368

... ...

Page 369

...Harte--but let him pass.

We propose to leave here for New York Oct. 21, reaching Hartford...

Page 370

... present at the Chicago reunion; but by this time he had decided...

Page 371

... With great respect,

...

Page 372

...off. I went down
stairs and was introduced to some scores of people, and among them...

Page 373

...seventeenth was issued for me. I was there, looking down
on the packed and struggling crowd...

Page 374

... ...

Page 375

...burly and magnificent Indian, in
General's uniform, striking a heroic attitude and getting that stuff off
in...

Page 376

... he said, commonly overlooked on these occasions--the babies--he
...

Page 377

...of the dinner table, but it was only on
account of my name, nothing more--they were...

Page 378

...I'll always be
grateful for your speech--Lord what a supreme thing it was." But I told
him...

Page 379

...hear you speak these splendid
chapters before a great audience--to read them by myself and hear
the...

Page 380

...to become an outlaw, reminds me of
Susie's newest and very earnest longing--to have crooked teeth...

Page 381

...ever since I saw you--I have been fighting a
life-and-death battle with this infernal book and...

Page 382

...which Mark Twain wrote to his brother Orion at this
period...

Page 383

...a pauper boy of the same age and countenance
(and half as much learning and still...

Page 384

...one which
Howells had done for Lawrence Barrett.

...

Page 385

... SAM.


...

Page 386

...thought of Hay, Warner,
Twichell, Aldrich, Osgood, Fields, Higginson, and a...

Page 387

...he had never ceased to
formulate others. Yet he hesitated...

Page 388

...in the conservatory--so you must go and make the entire house free
to him and the...

Page 389

... Yrs ever
...

Page 390

...expect you to ask that man to live with you," Howells
...

Page 391

... Fraulein [another]
...

Page 392

...more toothless; and the rest of us
are shadows, these many, many years. Yes, and your...

Page 393

...her warmest regards to you and Mrs. Aldrich--which I do, and add
those of

...

Page 394

...change in that programme that will make the enamel peel off
his teeth for very surprise--and...

Page 395

... on the subscription plan had been made on a royalty basis, beginning
...

Page 396

...are stripped away, is worth to the investor about $75
a month--so I shall tell Mr....

Page 397

...expect from you,
knowing what a bottom of fury there is...

Page 398

...case....

But it's getting dark. Merry Christmas to all of you.

...

Page 399

...in his support. Upon Garfield's election, however,
he felt himself...

Page 400

... I am, General,
...

Page 401

...see you--and the longer you can stay the gladder we shall be. I am
not going...

Page 402

...following letter gives the beginning of the
story:


*****


To W. D. Howells,...

Page 403

...the first day that fell
idle--and as I conducted her to the door, I tamed more...

Page 404

...tall something in the
corner, and presently there stood the clay statue, life size--a graceful
girlish creature,...

Page 405

...billiard night and I had company and so
was not down; but Livy and Clara became...

Page 406

...morning in the snow-storm--and there was a
stirring time. They will sail a week or ten...

Page 407

...calendar." He had not heard the
"Golden Arm" story and...

Page 408

...print: the weird wailing, the rising and
falling cadences of the wind, so easily mimicked with...

Page 409

... HARTFORD,...

Page 410

...Stoddard had decided that in
the warm light and comfort of...

Page 411

...many letters? I never could find that out. However, I suppose I did
it myself when...

Page 412

...It is
beautiful company, but it makes one restless and dissatisfied.

With love and thanks,

...

Page 413

...female faces, distinctive English
costumes, strange and marvelous English gaits--and yet such honest,
honorable, clean-souled countenances, just...

Page 414

... SAML.


*****


To Mrs. Clemens, in...

Page 415

...of any
first-class pain; I have a good appetite, and I...

Page 416

...first time
also, he heard the reasons for that wild charge delivered from the mouth
of a...

Page 417

...confession of violence and eagerness for
reprisal, followed by his acknowledgment...

Page 418

...latter great work, and then dismiss the subject for
good.

Well, ever since then I have worked...

Page 419

...Can you
conceive of a man's getting himself into a sweat over so diminutive a
provocation? I...

Page 420

... ...

Page 421

...is the correct thing to do. Now Osgood is the only
man in America, who can...

Page 422

...appears to have been caught unawares at a Tile Club dinner and made
...

Page 423

...him last. He married a young lady whom I knew. And now I have been
talking...

Page 424

...Atlantic for
the sole purpose of taking him by the hand and looking into his kind
eyes...

Page 425

...a somnambulist. Goodness gracious, you read me a chapter,
and it is a gentle, pearly dawn,...

Page 426

...been mentioned in the letter of May 17th.


*****


To John Garth, in Hannibal:

...

Page 427

...least
entertaining, did not always contribute to his peace of mind....

Page 428

...can write good books yet, but you can never match
this one. And speaking of the...

Page 429

...little while before had
come up from New Orleans to conquer the North with his wonderful...

Page 430

...it, as it would another
man to have one with an active business attached. You see...

Page 431

...to Florence; but we
have to leave these delights to you; there is no helping it....

Page 432

...light of
heart and full of ideas and news; also of...

Page 433

...to all eternity hugging the saints
and patriarchs and archangels, and forcing you to do the...

Page 434

...packed for her return home.
Florence Strong, one of Jewell's daughters, who lives in Detroit,
started East...

Page 435

...simple Portuguese soul with but slight knowledge of English
beyond that...

Page 436

...year back, the book is only just
now issued. A good long delay.

...

Page 437

...in August. He
has been sick, and needed the trip very much.

Mrs. Clemens had a long...

Page 438

...such booming working-days for many years. I
am piling up manuscript in a really astonishing way....

Page 439

...at Quarry Farm. Howells
wrote his approval of the idea...

Page 440

...it wouldn't be an easy job, or somebody would
have invented a decent historical game long...

Page 441

...of that month, the
latter half, working out their old idea....

Page 442

...probably
destroyed it, for no trace of the MS. exists to-day....

Page 443

...Yrs Ever
...

Page 444

...April-fool surprise for his host. He was a systematic man, and did
...

Page 445

... SAMUEL L. CLEMENS, ESQ.

Friends, suggest in each one's behalf
...

Page 446

...of my books for any
fair and reasonable sum whatever, if I could get out of...

Page 447

... ...

Page 448

... ...

Page 449

...that bars you and all other honest and honorable men (who are
independently situated) from voting...

Page 450

...do, that the reason the
majority of republicans are going to vote for Blaine is because...

Page 451

... program was presently omitted by request. If they spent
...

Page 452

...But
Grant had become a financier, as he believed, and the...

Page 453

... DETROIT, February...

Page 454

... ...

Page 455

... changed. General Grant had by this time developed cancer and...

Page 456

...at
that time, but am one now--that is, I am at least too shrewd to ever
again...

Page 457

... Mch 18, '85.

DEAR...

Page 458

...or two ago; but I continued to
hope--but not expect that he would pull through. The...

Page 459

...what
not, and nearly died from the overwork. I wouldn't read another of those
books for a...

Page 460

...Deronda and The Bostonians. He cared
little for writing that...

Page 461

...generation. We should
select a grave which will not merely be in the right place now,...

Page 462

...make too much of it, naturally
turned for information to the...

Page 463

... .........................

Captain Grant was frequently threatened by...

Page 464

...heard Sherman, Grant, Van Vliet and
others talk about theirs--mates with whom they were on the...

Page 465

...always excused his failures and
deficiencies with the one unvarying formula, "We are responsible
for these things...

Page 466

...then
enlarged the book--had to. Then he lost his voice. He was not quite done
yet, however:--there...

Page 467

... ...

Page 468

...to fool along considerable
slower than they used to.

I am mighty glad you are with the...

Page 469

...HOTEL NORMANDIE

...

Page 470

...special request of Miss Gilder--for the Critic.
These attentions came as...

Page 471

...they should live; and so I made sure to be by when
the surprise should come.

Charles...

Page 472

... ...

Page 473

...DEAR HOWELLS,--..... Here's a secret. A most curious and pathetic
romance, which has just come to...

Page 474

...then, her memory is wholly faded out and gone; and now she writes
letters to the...

Page 475

...about her uncertain, but there were
times when she was quite...

Page 476

...is going to die,
he is always in a sweat about where he is going to;...

Page 477

...I suppose your present idea is, to leave us a
little more in the dark.

Don't mind...

Page 478

...of
activity whatever, a sure market value, have been familiar with this
sort of solicitation. Reputation is...

Page 479

...end of people took you at
your word and believed you. And presently they find out...

Page 480

... Unmailed Answer:

DEAR SIR,--What is the trouble with you? If...

Page 481

...the worth of a shirt and asking me for the shirt itself? Perhaps you
didn't know...

Page 482

...including the author, have "tried" to dramatize Tom Sawyer and
did not arrive, what sort of...

Page 483

...Sonora University
and offered me the post of Professor of Moral Culture and the Dogmatic
Humanities; which...

Page 484

...on the stage,
you must take the legal consequences.

...

Page 485

...without its share of
the swag. It is delicious. The biggest and proudest government on earth
turned...

Page 486

...and the widows and orphans of paupers and
takes no risk--why the thought just gags me.

Oh,...

Page 487

... Truly Yours,
...

Page 488

...(and should stand) in
everybody's way who applies for pay or position before he has served
his...

Page 489

... HARTFORD, Feb. 15, '87.

DEAR HOWELLS,--I was in New York...

Page 490

... ...

Page 491

...there seemed to be no hurry, and so I
have not hurried. Tales of stirring adventure...

Page 492

...two
offers were made me for weekly literary contributions to continue during
a year, and they would...

Page 493

...up to the Cranes to help us occupy the
lounges and hammocks--whence a great panorama of...

Page 494

...under their heels in the stables--and that is but a
continuation of her Hartford system of...

Page 495

...same to them at 50 that it did
at all former milestones in their journey. I...

Page 496

... ...

Page 497

...much But as I was saying--if you
are not busy I will look back and see...

Page 498

...expense?

Wasn't it good that they caught me out with an old book instead of a...

Page 499

... "A Petition to the Queen of England."

From the following...

Page 500

... ...

Page 501

...from him for years when a letter came which invited the
...

Page 502

...Major, and shall be gladder still to see you in November.

...

Page 503

...of any other thing. Even liars have to admit that,
if they are intelligent liars; I...

Page 504

...spirit, but in the spirit of want-to-help-if-I-can. They
would be useful to me if said to...

Page 505

...our love to Ma if she can get the idea.

...

Page 506

...and rest, to-day; but I couldn't resist. I mean to try to
knock off tomorrow, but...

Page 507

...evening, in the midst of the maelstrom of chat and chaff
and laughter, with the sort...

Page 508

... science. Once, at an earlier date, he recorded that he had...

Page 509

... ...

Page 510

...boat on land or a wagon on water, to speak figuratively. Spoken
speech is one thing,...

Page 511

...in earnest and
where I was joking; or whether I was joking altogether or in earnest
altogether....

Page 512

... ...

Page 513

...the
glass and the calipers showed the difference. Paige had always said
that the machine would measure...

Page 514

...N. Y.:

...

Page 515

... ...

Page 516

...and Goodness which we do not see or feel." And a
few days later, he wrote:...

Page 517

...who could illustrate this one. Yes, it was a fortunate
...

Page 518

...I was
afraid to pray, for fear I should laugh. Well, I'm not going to despair;
we'll...

Page 519

...glad and proud--and the sooner it gets in, the better for the
book; though I don't...

Page 520

... HARTFORD, Sept. 22, '89.

DEAR HOWELLS,--It is immensely good of you...

Page 521

... MARK.


The type-setting machine began to loom large in the...

Page 522

...back as
1880.


*****

To Joseph T. Goodman, in Nevada:

...

Page 523

...is as simple and sure.

Anybody can set type on it who can read--and can do...

Page 524

...of it. I want you to run over here, roost over the machine a
week and...

Page 525

...Hartford and was now making
a visit in Keokuk.


*****

To Mrs. Moffett,...

Page 526

...should
see the thrones of Europe selling at auction for old iron. I believe I
should really...

Page 527

...Things are working.
By and by there is going to be an emigration, may be. Of...

Page 528

...the other
day; but when she goes together again the 15th of January we expect her
to...

Page 529

...does; I hope it
does, though of course I can't realize it and believe it. But...

Page 530

...a very hearty welcome in England. English
readers did not...

Page 531

...to a little higher level
of manhood in turn.

...

Page 532

...from him his ancient habit of judging all books by one standard,
and thenceforth follow a...

Page 533

...are already saved that are best worth trying to
uplift, I should think, but the mighty...

Page 534

...yours in a case of this kind, or carry greater weight of authority.


...

Page 535

...of his time, and the
kindest; and yet he died without setting one of his bondmen...

Page 536

...31, '90.

DEAR JOE,--If you were here, I should say, "Get you to Washington and
beg Senator...

Page 537

...him to accept the check for five thousand
dollars in this...

Page 538

...not complete and binding until you shall
have convinced yourself that the machine's character and prospects...

Page 539

...a large part of his
time traveling back and forth between...

Page 540

...and then, and no doubt
Paige was itching to take it...

Page 541

...of Russia, and in a letter which he wrote during the summer of 1890,
...

Page 542

...the Czar's government, and that one must descend
into hell to find its counterpart, one turns...

Page 543

...public right
until it was wrenched from them by bloody violence, is it rational to
suppose that...

Page 544

...same stripe, and only one Russian family that isn't.

...

Page 545

...at the end
of October, and his wife's mother, in Elmira...

Page 546

... prospects were anything but golden.


*****

To W. D. Howells, in Boston:

...

Page 547

... MARK.


Probably Mark Twain did not return to literary work reluctantly. He had
always enjoyed writing...

Page 548

...smallest minds and the selfishest
souls and the cowardliest hearts that God makes.

And I was some...

Page 549

...drop-in at the Boylston Building (New
England Phonograph Co) and talk into a phonograph in an...

Page 550

... It wouldn't fatigue me to talk for an hour as I
...

Page 551

..."Mental Telegraphy" article to
Harper's--with a modest postscript. Probably read it to you years ago.

...

Page 552

...every time I
tallied with him. When February arrived, I saw signs which were mighty
plain reading....

Page 553

...least give him a start on the other side. The family began
...

Page 554

...to confess.


*****

To W. D. Howells, in Boston:

...

Page 555

... Ys Ever
...

Page 556

...boat and engaged its owner as their
pilot. It was...

Page 557

...kind.

...

Page 558

... ...

Page 559

...reached me in Lyons last night
and was very pleasant news indeed.

I was up and shaved...

Page 560

...around--but here he is perfection, and brim full of useful
alacrities and helps and ingenuities.

When I...

Page 561

...and the pauper
and the slave built churches, and the credit of it went to the...

Page 562

...finer, as I know by old Mississippi experience. I did so long for you
and Sue...

Page 563

...you like, go to Basel, and Monday to Berlin. But I
shall be at your disposal,...

Page 564

... up the Rhone one September day, exactly twenty-two years after the
...

Page 565

...that it was the best one, while his own judgment
told him to take the one...

Page 566

... NIMES, Oct. 1, '91.

DEAR JOE,--I have been...

Page 567

...BERLIN, Nov. 27, '91.

DEAR MR. HALL,--That kind of a statement is valuable. It came this
morning....

Page 568

... ...

Page 569

...S. L. C.

P. S. Just finished the above and finished raging at the eternal German
tax-gatherer,...

Page 570

... ...

Page 571

...travel. This was not until the first of
March, when,...

Page 572

...Fiske, they
discovered the Villa Viviani, near Settignano, an old palace
...

Page 573

... The new Paige company
had a factory started in Chicago...

Page 574

...8 years and 80.

When I was in New York the other day Mrs. Dodge, editor...

Page 575

...pleasure resort,
Saturday, to dine with some friends, and in the morning I went walking
in the...

Page 576

... LUCERNE, Sept. 18, '92.

DEAR...

Page 577

...supper at our inn--Livy not in it. She was
merely allowed a glimpse, no more. Of...

Page 578

... was but a little distance away.


*****

To Mrs. Crane, in Elmira:

...

Page 579

...beguiled the Marchese into putting a big porcelain
stove in the vast central hall. She is...

Page 580

...butler talk together in their respective tongues, piecing
out and patching up with the universal sign-language...

Page 581

...in the show, a variation which occurs every 15
minutes between dawn and night. Once early...

Page 582

...to a minor but not insignificant place.

The minor character will now become the chiefest, and...

Page 583

...interests--anything that would sustain his ship until
the L. A. L. tide should turn and float...

Page 584

...to endorse it over to you in my name.)
If you need that $3,000 put it...

Page 585

...he offered a quarter interest
for the modest sum of two hundred thousand dollars. But in...

Page 586

...of credit does not cover
the unexpended balance of the old one but falls considerably short...

Page 587

... ...

Page 588

...to see Carnegie; at all events nothing
seems to have come...

Page 589

...Clemens reached New York on the 3d of April and made a trip to
...

Page 590

... ...

Page 591

...to an
English lady. She is a neighbor of mine outside of Florence, and has a
great...

Page 592

...indebtedness and $116,679.20 over. Is that it? In addition
we have the L. A. L. plates...

Page 593

... S. L. C.


*****

To Rev. Jos. H. Twichell, in Hartford:

...

Page 594

... ...

Page 595

...amount.

Mr. Clemens and I have the greatest possible desire, not to increase in
any way your...

Page 596

...on every dollar the publisher shall actually invest in it--I
mean in making and selling the...

Page 597

... ...

Page 598

...the family against the alms-house for one more
year--and after that--well,...

Page 599

... Yours Sincerely
...

Page 600

...in, and no scenery--the story is stripped for flight!

Now, then what is she worth? The...

Page 601

... Yours...

Page 602

...who is in it can do
that--but I have tried not to burden you thoughtlessly or...

Page 603

... ...

Page 604

...as soon as I can get the family moved and
settled.

...

Page 605

...transfer made to-morrow morning.

Meantime I have got the best and wisest man in the whole...

Page 606

... ...

Page 607

... subdivided letter, most of which has no general interest and is...

Page 608

...and drop it
and we would totally change the subject and take up the scenery, etc.

(Here...

Page 609

...Jersey City and deposited
me at the Players. There--that's all. This letter is to make up...

Page 610

...long-distance telephone. We keep the wires loaded.

Dear me, dinner is ready. So Mrs. Rice says.

...

Page 611

...for 9.

The coachman sent in for him at 9; but he said, "Oh, nonsense!--leave
glories and...

Page 612

...and fetched Dr. Rice while I
(went) to the Players and picked up two artists--Reid and...

Page 613

...Simmons."

I had an engagement at a beautiful dwelling close to the Players for
10.30; I was...

Page 614

...ever
been anything else.

Mrs. H. came skipping in, presently, the very person, to a dot, that...

Page 615

...to add; but, whether
or no, I must mail this to morrow, for the mail steamer...

Page 616

...up to the name which Jamie Dodge has given me--the "Belle of
New York"--and it just...

Page 617

...or Feb. Century.
John Drew, actor;
James Barnes, a marvelous mimic;...

Page 618

... ...

Page 619

...no more about business for awhile, and
have a rest. And he needs it. But it...

Page 620

... ...

Page 621

...afraid you would delay the assignment too long."

John Mackay called yesterday, and said, "Don't let...

Page 622

...on Fenimore Cooper by the time he reached London. In
...

Page 623

... ...

Page 624

...pretty cobwebby yet.

I am hoping that along about this time I shall hear that the...

Page 625

... ...

Page 626

...be of this character:

[Several pages of suggestions for reconstructing the machine follow.]

Don't say I'm wild....

Page 627

...choke up. I know you "mean every word you say" and I do take it
"in...

Page 628

...Now if you will alter it to suit your judgment and bang away, I
shall be...

Page 629

... [No date.]

DEAR MR. ROGERS,--Yours of Dec. 21 has...

Page 630

... Sincerely yours,
...

Page 631

...to plank
the check on delivery, and it was partly to meet that demand that I...

Page 632

...the long strain gone, I am in a sort of physical collapse today,
but it will...

Page 633

...reading-tour around the world. He was nearly sixty years old, and
...

Page 634

...company. One was the wife
of His Excellency Admiral Bridge, Commander-in Chief of the Australian
Station, and...

Page 635

... ...

Page 636

... Nothing in
this world can save it from being a...

Page 637

...nothing for this defeat, because it
was not my fault. My first half hour showed that...

Page 638

...to that far country in order that I may unload
from my conscience a debt long...

Page 639

...one this time. I lectured last night without inconvenience, but
the doctors thought best to forbid...

Page 640

... if we may judge by Mark Twain's next.

...

Page 641

...or big open court)
and wouldn't let me cross a white mark that was on the...

Page 642

...the
Rev. Mr. Gray had just arrived, and the warden, a genial, elderly Boer
named Du Plessis--explained...

Page 643

... Jameson raid would not be out of place here. Dr. Leander Starr
...

Page 644

... travels.

The two daughters in America, Susy and Jean, were...

Page 645

... ...

Page 646

...now--as Livy always saw--that
she had greatness in her; and that she herself was dimly conscious...

Page 647

... ...

Page 648

...must retire from the struggle for a College
degree for lack of support for herself and...

Page 649

...can say that any of those who contributed to her success ever
...

Page 650

...that 'Following the Equator' is more serious than
his other books...

Page 651

...the bank; the amount known, the need
to look at it daily, handle it, weigh it,...

Page 652

...all the day, and all the days, wonders how it all
happened, and why. We others...

Page 653

...splendid praises, so daringly uttered and so warmly.
The words stir the dead heart of me,...

Page 654

... ...

Page 655

... ...

Page 656

...room sat the Jubilees in a row. The Singers got up
and stood--the talking and glass...

Page 657

...spend his life in Weggis "as
anywhere else in the geography,"...

Page 658

...clash between Czech and Austrian. I wish
I could understand these quarrels, but of course I...

Page 659

...yours
...

Page 660

...was another man; that I am out of debt--it was another man;
and now comes this...

Page 661

...up and developing ideas
and stirring the public soul. I am assured that every time a...

Page 662

... HOTEL...

Page 663

... none of importance. The money had been accumulating in Mr....

Page 664

...abundant peace of mind
again--no sense of burden. Work is become a pleasure again--it is not
labor...

Page 665

...couldn't be done
as it ought to be done except by a man who had lived...

Page 666

... ...

Page 667

...breath of it get out. First I thought I would
lay it up along with a...

Page 668

...would all go into the papers, and
be cabled all over the world, and make an...

Page 669

...by an
hour and a half.

Wasn't it a rattling good comedy situation? Seems a kind of...

Page 670

...as I could. It is a machine. It automatically
punches the holes in the jacquard cards,...

Page 671

...be as choice an
investment as Government bonds. When the patents died the Company would
be so...

Page 672

...the early days of the type-machine would have saved
him a...

Page 673

...MARK.


They were spending the summer at Kaltenleutgeben, a pleasant village
...

Page 674

...each other up from any part of the world and talk by mental
telegraph--and not merely...

Page 675

...I shall deny myself and restrict it to one. (If you should see
a little short...

Page 676

... KALTENLEUTGEBEN, Sep. 13, '98.

DEAR JOE,--You are...

Page 677

...Saturday,
when the funeral cortege marches. We are invited to occupy a room in the
sumptuous new...

Page 678

...1898 found Mark Twain once more in easy, even
luxurious, circumstances....

Page 679

...a house and
furniture in Hartford; that my English and American copyrights pay an
income which represents...

Page 680

...food) but we couldn't
get the half of it in New York for the same money...

Page 681

... ...

Page 682

...did with 400,000 then. The
allies could take 1,400 of the men, and give Napoleon 1,400...

Page 683

... HOTEL KRANTZ, WEIN, I, NEUER MART 6,
...

Page 684

... ...

Page 685

...heaven. Some day I will read it, and if its lying
cheerfulness fools me, then I...

Page 686

...her ambition
she has suffered disappointment for the third time--and will never fare
any better, I hope,...

Page 687

...the frequency of former years. Perhaps neither of them was
...

Page 688

...supposing it was the usual thing and
wondered at the unusually large gathering; two other Austrians...

Page 689

...my first visit, and how long we expect to stay, and did I see
the foot-washing,...

Page 690

...was not found until
after his death. Six years later...

Page 691

... ...

Page 692

...to be outside. I shall
never see another sunset to begin with it this side of...

Page 693

...America:

...

Page 694

...journey."]--was
delicious--every word of it. You haven't lost any of your splendid art.
Callers have arrived.

...

Page 695

... ...

Page 696

...drawing-room talk,
now--Murray would explain; and added a P. S.: "You mustn't think it is
because I...

Page 697

...are at luncheon, now--and not
eating it. Nothing is so lonesome as gadding around platforming. I...

Page 698

...States in spite of the opposition of the
physicians; that it has established 20 Osteopathic schools...

Page 699

...method
of defending his body against disease and death.

And yet at the same time, with curious...

Page 700

...his thought to it, and wrote several long appreciations, perhaps with
little idea of publication, but...

Page 701

...him a
regret or two when He came to think it over and observe effects. For...

Page 702

...nature had he lived to see the great World War, fought mainly
...

Page 703

...better in the place of it. But that is
not possible, perhaps. Poor as it is,...

Page 704

...damage me. I can't afford that;
even the Archbishop of Canterbury couldn't afford it, and he...

Page 705

...we shall have them with
us always, and there will be no parting.

It was a moving...

Page 706

... Robinson, one-time Governor of Connecticut, long a dear and intimate
...

Page 707

... C.

DOLLIS HILL,...

Page 708

...since Susy died; it is
five years and a month that I saw her alive for...

Page 709

...years ago, and are mistaken by foreigners for it. Some
quite respectable Englishmen still frequent them...

Page 710

...shall ever be strong
enough to endure that strain.

...

Page 711

... ...

Page 712

... were good for his health. His letters of this period were...

Page 713

...Mark Twain's private
violence on a subject which, in public print,...

Page 714

...blundered
up to his neck in the Philippine mess; and that I am grieved because
this great...

Page 715

... ...

Page 716

...Excursion he tells of an old sea captain, one Hurricane Jones, who
...

Page 717

...know that that
is a kind of refreshment which he is very capable of enjoying.

...

Page 718

...enjoy without the chance; the last half consists of the chance
without the capacity.

I am admonished...

Page 719

...you say, it is impracticable--in my case, certainly. For
me to assist in an appeal to...

Page 720

...his tail
curved over his back and munch his food. They come to dinner, 7 p.
m.,...

Page 721

... AMPERSAND,...

Page 722

...effects of powerful emotion the talkers are
saying wild things, crazy things--they are out of themselves,...

Page 723

...the opportunity comes a shade too late, the chances are
that it has come permanently too...

Page 724

...she is proud to be able to say
she knew him "as familiarly as you know...

Page 725

...seen. They were elected without their consent from among those
who wrote to him without his...

Page 726

...of your membership except myself--that no
Member knows another's name, but only her country; that no...

Page 727

... RIVERDALE-ON-THE-HUDSON.
...

Page 728

...fuel, and not so much as a bare suggestion to that exterior
engineer as to what...

Page 729

... ...

Page 730

...the best significance of that word. The new day of
...

Page 731

...gentle reception.

Still, there is a detail or two connected with this matter which ought
perhaps to...

Page 732

...at 12 noon, beating
the telegram 2 solid hours, and 5 minutes over.

The boy brought the...

Page 733

...such a rule would discredit an idiot; in fact an
idiot--I mean a common ordinary Christian...

Page 734

... BUCAREST, May 9, 1902.

HONORED MASTER,--If I...

Page 735

...is the utterance of an entirely competent authority--the best
that occupies a throne, and as good...

Page 736

...time of life when it is not wise to take these risks.
You would better jump...

Page 737

...Thank you for your dear, dear note; you
who are my own and only sweetheart.

...

Page 738

... ...

Page 739

...that
contributed. It takes a thousand men to invent a telegraph, or a steam
engine, or a...

Page 740

...dear, I am running short of vocabulary today. Ever
lovingly your friend,

...

Page 741

...with her, but my notion is, that no art
of healing is the best for all...

Page 742

...days ago I was in condition--during one horribly long night--to
sympathetically roast with you in your...

Page 743

...and a specialist met in conspiracy five days ago, and
in their belief she will by...

Page 744

... ...

Page 745

...admiring
the placid flood and flow of his own dilutions, ceases from being
artificial, and is for...

Page 746

... RIVERDALE, May 8,'03...

Page 747

...and safe for the dead only. I
value the impulse which moves you to tender me...

Page 748

...from
distinctions which have to be arranged beforehand and with my privity,
for I then became a...

Page 749

... ...

Page 750

...the Villa Papiniano was not completed, after
all, and through a...

Page 751

...Malory,
Spenser, Shakespeare, Boswell, Carlyle, Le Sage. In thinking over one
and then another, and then all...

Page 752

...in a way that has more
than once brought tears to my eyes) has Mark Twain....

Page 753

...one who remains unknown, for she
failed to sign her name...

Page 754

...to thank you and to tell you. "God always
love Mark Twain!" is often my wish....

Page 755

...or
sung--with the bell-buoy breaking in, out of the distance.

"The Old Men," delicious, isn't it? And...

Page 756

...rain all day. This house is not merely
large, it...

Page 757

...work. They are a persistent
inspiration. To-day is very lovely; when the afternoon arrives there
will be...

Page 758

...fiendish year and a half--and I forgive none of
them--but here she comes up again as...

Page 759

...shirtfront? Even
you won't tell the black heart's--truth. The...

Page 760

... ...

Page 761

...sympathy I beg the privilege of signing myself

...

Page 762

...many!) since we could
have said a hopeful word, but this morning Katy came the minute...

Page 763

...reflect the hope and fear that
daily and hourly alternated at...

Page 764

...20 months of bed-ridden solitude and bodily misery
she all of a sudden ceases to be...

Page 765

...have interfered, and I must remain in Florence. Although I
have never taken prizes anywhere else...

Page 766

...better that afternoon than for three months.
Yet it was only...

Page 767

...the summer home of R. W. Gilder, at Tyringham,
Massachusetts, and...

Page 768

... S. L....

Page 769

...with you, oh fortunate man! And John, whom mine
was so fond of. The sight of...

Page 770

... Susy and little Langdon. R. W. Gilder had arranged for them...

Page 771

...and cold. And unresponsive to my reverent caresses--a new thing
to me and a new thing...

Page 772

...climb away down and do it.

It is interesting, wonderfully interesting--the miracles which
party-politics can do with...

Page 773

...your clean and
wholesome private character once more and be happy--and useful.

I know I ought to...

Page 774

...but a bit of an old
Scotch song--

...

Page 775

...me to thank you--and words could not deliver
what I feel, anyway. I will put the...

Page 776

...(as a rule) I meet Roosevelt the statesman and politician, I
find him destitute of morals...

Page 777

...In much of his later writing
--A Mysterious Stranger for example--he...

Page 778

...no member of it is honest in all the ways
required by--by what? By his own...

Page 779

...the average brain here or elsewhere. I will prove it
to you, some time, if you...

Page 780

... ...

Page 781

... wrote a hearty letter of welcome when he heard the news. Clemens
...

Page 782

...did not go, but he sent a letter that
we may...

Page 783

...would do you more good
to look at than the next one will, if you go...

Page 784

...for anything. I only say it in envy of his indestructible
youth, anyway. Howells will be...

Page 785

...had been literature
once--before I sold it to be degraded to an advertisement of the Buffalo
Fair....

Page 786

...I have myself
all along entertained."

Clemens...

Page 787

... ...

Page 788

... Minnie Maddern Fiske, asking him to write something that would aid
...

Page 789

... ...

Page 790

...if it would be troublesome or cause delay.

I hope you will reproduce the cat-pile, full...

Page 791

... top. When it was learned that he was to spend the summer...

Page 792

...spouting, Sundays; occasional phosphorescent
effects, nights; every other day a streak of black smoke trailing along
under...

Page 793

...beyond the frame the
billowy sweep of remote great ranges rises to view and flows, fold...

Page 794

...I stopped, then. I was not
tired, but I had no books on hand that needed...

Page 795

...have had 60 years
experience.

No, that is not what I mean; I mean I know a...

Page 796

...has a private history. Sarony was
as much of an enthusiast about wild animals as he...

Page 797

...At seventy
he had returned to the world, more beloved, more...

Page 798

...is a tragedy now. When I was 43 and John
Hay 41 he said life was...

Page 799

... ...

Page 800

...beside him,
they arranged the series with the idea of publication....

Page 801

... ...

Page 802

...shan't retire from the
gratis-platform until after I am dead and courtesy requires me to keep
still...

Page 803

...I ask in order that we may
be able to say when carriages may be called.

...

Page 804

...then
and pretend to be asking information concerning Fulton. I...

Page 805

... Most sincerely yours,
...

Page 806

...which I read to you in Hartford about 30 years ago and which
you said "publish--and...

Page 807

...me time to brace up my voice, and get a new start. Jean
wanted to keep...

Page 808

...color, endowed with those
riches which are denied to no nation on the planet--humor and feeling.

Talk...

Page 809

...father pretended great indignation that the first poem
written by Bynner...

Page 810

...it brings into play every muscle in the body and
exercises them all.

The games begin right...

Page 811

... knowing the dinner would be strenuous, did not feel able to...

Page 812

...writer to accompany him, and
elsewhere I have told in detail...

Page 813

... This was mainly a joke. Mark Twain did not expect any...

Page 814

... ...

Page 815

...1907-1910

VOLUME VI.

By Mark Twain


ARRANGED WITH COMMENT BY ALBERT BIGELOW PAINE




XLVI. LETTERS 1907-08. A DEGREE FROM...

Page 816

... ...

Page 817

...even if it angered me such words
as those of Professor Phelps would take the sting...

Page 818

... ...

Page 819

...or two
longer--I can't tell, yet. I do very much want to meet up with the...

Page 820

... ...

Page 821

... MARK TWAIN


Elinor Glyn, author of Three Weeks and other...

Page 822

... ...

Page 823

...London:

...

Page 824

... greatest joy in life-presented itself to him always with the thought
...

Page 825

... The new home at Redding was completed in the spring of 1908,...

Page 826

... Very truly yours,
...

Page 827

...cases the suggestions come
to the brain from the outside. The brain never acts except from...

Page 828

... Your friend...

Page 829

... With love to you both,
...

Page 830

...asks no help and gets none. I have retired from New
York for good, I have...

Page 831

...the influence of all the
rest of the Holy Family put together.

You have asked me a...

Page 832

...East side, New York. And it supports and re-affirms what
I have so often and strenuously...

Page 833

...making of clothes. Hundreds of our children
learn, the plays by listening without book, and by...

Page 834

... ...

Page 835

...days are over for good and all.

...

Page 836

...at its best when all around was
summer-green; later it seemed at its best when all...

Page 837

...he's not perplexed:
...

Page 838

...beautiful mantel was put in its place an hour ago,
and its friendly "Aloha" was the...

Page 839

... STORMFIELD, REDDING, CONNECTICUT,
...

Page 840

...a letter from him came one day to Stormfield concerning his new
...

Page 841

...short for Take 40--or as we postmen say, grab 40"

"Go on, please, while I think...

Page 842

... It was in 1907 that Clemens had seen the Oxford Pageant--during...

Page 843

... ...

Page 844

... ...

Page 845

...as comely and substantial a legislative edifice as
lifts its domes and towers and protective lightning...

Page 846

...Mrs. Eddy stole it from Quimby; that its healing principle (its
most valuable asset) possesses the...

Page 847

... ...

Page 848

...and the maid, and the boy and
the roustabout and Jean's coachman are left--just enough to...

Page 849

... ...

Page 850

...went back to
those balmy islands. He had always loved...

Page 851

...said he was. So that incident is closed. And pleasantly and entirely
satisfactorily. Everything is all...

Page 852

... ...

Page 853

...about me: and even if I don't I am proud and well
contented, since you think...

Page 854

... ...

Page 855

... Allen: writing had become an effort to him. Yet we did not...

Page 856

... stock and poultry. After her death he had wished the place...

Page 857

... ...

Page 858

... The bloodroot is white underfoot,
...

Page 859

...Carlyle,
...

Page 860

... ...

Page 861

... With pity and wisdom and love?

...

Page 862

... With that incomparable drawl
...