Life on the Mississippi, Part 9.

By Mark Twain

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...LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI

...

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...broad second-story verandas
crowded with gentlemen and ladies clothed according to the latest mode.

Not that there...

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...is a driving place
commercially, and has a great river, ocean, and railway business. At
the...

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...wells, and so they take rain-water.
Neither can they conveniently have cellars, or graves,{footnote [The
Israelites are...

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...of it, but I cannot
accomplish it. I think there is no genuinely sentimental part...

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...seemed to aggravate the disease.

'In 1828 Professor Bianchi demonstrated how the fearful reappearance of
the plague...

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...have cost less
than four, probably, if it had been built to put something useful into.
He...

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...mahogany
if he can go an iron casket with silver door-plate and bronze handles.
That's a coffin....

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...one.'

'Well,' said I, 'if you are so light-hearted and jolly in ordinary
times, what must you...

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...manner--

'I wouldn't worry about that, if I had your chances.' Much he knew about
it--the family...

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...hay and things do not grow in the
Academy of Music; but no doubt it is...

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...less
criminal forms of sin.

Thousands of people come by rail and carriage to West End and...

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...Dinner.

Jackson Declining Lee's Invitation to Dinner--with Thanks.

Jackson Apologizing for a Heavy Defeat.

Jackson Reporting a Great...

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...to do it,' meaning 'I didn't mean to do
it.' The Northern word 'guess'--imported from England,...

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...of 'Oh, that's for
lagniappe.' If the waiter in the restaurant stumbles and spills a gill
of...

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...another
reason: In the war, each of us, in his own person, seems to have sampled
all...

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...created a dim but valuable light,
which enabled his own men to grope their way around...

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...never saw people enjoy
anything more than this gathering enjoyed this fight. The case was the
same...

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...is all that the
editor of the 'Times-Democrat' would have got out of it. There...

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...This is an excellent report,
as long as the women stay out of it. But when...

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...a body, after a couple of false starts,
and scampered off with prodigious spirit. As each...

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...all manner of giants, dwarfs, monstrosities, and other
diverting grotesquerie--a startling and wonderful sort of show,...

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...crowned heads in Europe were gods before, they are only men,
since, and can never be...

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...of the American Revolution owned slaves; so
did the Southerner of the Civil War: but the...

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...got up and received him. We were
able to detect him among the crowd of arrivals...

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...happened to be borne by living and
sensitive citizens of New Orleans. His names were either...

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...and
find him still only thirty-five. I have not had an experience of this
kind before, I...

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...in cane; and there is a fruitful orange grove of five thousand
trees. The cane...

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...of limited
time, we went back home. The sail up the breezy and sparkling river...

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...happy. Perfectly happy.

Q. How do you amuse yourself?

A. Conversation with friends, and other spirits.

Q....

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...part to meet no more;--for even if I fail to
avoid your asylum, a meeting there...

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...The pilot-farmer disappears from the river
annually, about the breaking of spring, and is seen no...

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...walking
into the stern of a steamboat, he stepped out on deck, and said, with
heavenly serenity,...

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...but had replied as became a pilot to
reply--

'I will not go. If I go,...

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...floor.

Mr. Bixby had been blown up, in Madrid bend; was not injured, but the
other pilot...

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...years dead. He
was a fine man, a high-minded man, and greatly respected both ashore and
on...

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...this day; in
fact, is rendered obligatory by act of Congress.

'As general items of river history,...

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...and many a time did this ancient mariner appear on the scene in the
above fashion,...

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...thousand words. I was a 'cub' at the time. I showed
my performance to some...

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...lit up with the white glare of five miles of
electric lights. It was a wonderful...

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...made over that piece of water.

The next morning I came on with the four o'clock...

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...have seen in the Mississippi Valley. I may not have seen the
Alps do their best,...

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...and by. He was standing musing on a street corner, with his
left hand on his...

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...fire. Yet, poor devil, he had been patiently studying the part of
Hamlet for more...

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...Then I branched off and went home. I was not feeling
any solicitude about him of...

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...evening and said--

'I have a most remarkable letter here, which I want to read to...

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...other day I came across an old friend of mine--a
clergyman--who had seen this letter, and...

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...in a
hurry. When i got here i had $1 and 25 cents left & i...

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...would give me $16 a
month & bord me. You bet i took that chance...

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...the best job i ever did in my life, & i commenced another of
the same...

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...thanksgiving any
way--next week Mr. Brown takes me into his store as lite porter & will
advance...

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...letter
drowned them in their own tears. Then my friend put it into a sermon and
went...

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...know that letter to be genuine?'

It was the first suspicion that had ever been voiced;...

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...sure to look
after him.

This letter arrived a few days after it was written--and up went...

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...yet.' All the copies of the famous letter
except mine disappeared suddenly; and from that...

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...river.

When I, as a boy, first saw the mouth of the Missouri River, it was
twenty-two...

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...the town as it was, and not as it is,
and recognizing and metaphorically shaking hands...

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...is supposed to have gone to the dogs.'

'He was bright, and promised well when he...

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...damned
fool they'll never find it out. There's one thing sure--if I had a
damned fool I...

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...calling back their former inmates out of the moldy
past. Among them I presently recognized the...

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...myself all the time, by feeling a
secret bitterness against Lem for having attracted this fatal...

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...stretched them
all dead in their beds by this time! The anguish and the fright which
this...

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...were all
bathing in a muddy creek which had a deep hole in it, and in...

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...and entangled there,
helplessly. I fled to the surface and told the awful news. Some...

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...been worth not
less than five hundred dollars apiece. They are colored folk.

After breakfast, I went...

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...say was an array of fresh young comeliness
not matchable in another Sunday-school of the same...

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...wished to see; but he was gone. Dead, these
many years, they said. Once or...

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...with his first murder;
described it, told what measures he had taken to avert suspicion; then
passed...

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...He had always used that same
consecrated knife; with it he had murdered his long array...

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...ashamed of myself; I
took no further interest in him, and never went to his shop...

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...of the cave. The top of the cylinder was removable;
and it was said to be...

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...with the rest. The tramp had used his matches
disastrously: he had set his straw...

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...talker in my sleep. But one night I awoke and found my
bed-mate--my younger brother--sitting up...

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...now. Do you
know how the man came to be burned up in the calaboose?'

'No.'

'Haven't you...

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... It is all a person can do in a world like this.'

And now, my...

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...churches, and a grand court-house, with grounds which occupy a
square. The population of the...

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...could put his
intellectual hand on it whenever it was wanted.

His clothes differed in no respect...

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...wash of a wave. The figure
remained as before, thoughtfully inspecting. Another wave started--
laughter, this...

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...the shabby dens
which usually do duty as theaters in cities of Burlington's size.

We had not...

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...and who are competent to do it, because they are
educated and enlightened; they read, they...

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...gives
the former seventy-one thousand, and the latter seventy-eight thousand.
This book will not reach the public...

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...they really know how to
plow, and if I don't show you our mark on the...

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...the sacred solitude to rags and tatters with its devil's
warwhoop and the roar and thunder...

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...above, no harvesters below--there's a patent
self-binder now, and they don't have harvesters any more; they've...

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...looking-glass--when the water 's still; and then the monstrous
bluffs on both sides of the river--ragged,...

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...most charming and magnificent view of the valley
before us suddenly bursts upon our vision; rugged...

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...gave it its name, Not many years ago this
locality was a favorite resort for the...

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...tales were full of incident and imagination--a pleasant impression
which would be promptly dissipated if the...

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...sparkled with animation, and a smile played upon his lips. He
walked with a light and...

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...earliest species of northern plants.

'The Undying Head' is a rather long tale, but it makes...

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...that the rich
Protestant puts up, the kind that the poor Irish 'hired-girl' delights
to erect. ...

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...these interests bring the
newspaper; the newspaper starts up politics and a railroad; all hands
turn to...

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...of
grinding it.

Sixteen railroads meet in Minneapolis, and sixty-five passenger trains
arrive and depart daily. In...

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...breeze gently moved the two gay feathers in his head-dress, and as
he mounted on the...

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...the
fury of a mad panther, pounced upon his prey. The animal turned, and
with one stroke...

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...saw when you
passed through the last time. The Pennsylvania road rushed us to New
York...

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...improvised shelter
earth had been placed, on which they built their fire.

The current running down the...

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...be barely
distinguished in the gloom.

A few miles up this river, the depth of water on...

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...door and a bloated carcass, solemnly guarded by a pair of
buzzards, the only bird to...

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...ones. They is dropping off powerful fast.
But what can you do? It 's all...

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...one to
imagine. The water was so high there was great danger of their houses
being swept...

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...of Catahoula. He has
made Troy his headquarters, and to this point boats come for...

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...of 'The Times-Democrat,' has
sent the 'Susie' up for that purpose. Mrs. Taylor said she...

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...brought into requisition and a gap made. After much labor the
horses and mules were securely...

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...now that our efforts ought to be directed towards saving life, as
the increase of the...

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...but very much of the work which had depended upon
the slave labor was also destroyed...

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...bank secures at some points a fair depth of channel and some degree
of permanence, so...

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...stream should have less slope, because it has less
frictional surface in proportion to capacity; i.e.,...

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...on his
part to attempt to present the facts relating to an enterprise which
calls for the...

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...these, perhaps, were hardly to be
expected. Other nations have been called thin-skinned, but the citizens
of...

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...out things to admire and commend. When he praises,
it is with evident pleasure; and when...

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...the
abuse I must meet for stating it. But it is not so.

. . . ....

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...She had just untied the belt to which the
implements were fastened, when suddenly the event,...

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...me where I told you.' And fearfully she obeyed it in all
its commands. Retaining its...

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...met and
started. The snow was on the ground, and they traveled all night, lest
others should...

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...distant mountain, a mammoth
bear.

The distance between them was very great, but the size of the...

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...said, running forward and
giving the peculiar yell, and a howl as if the sounds came...

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... Again the leader asked the
brothers if they could do nothing for their safety. All...

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...to the lake, they saw the canoe with ten paddles, and immediately
they embarked. Scarcely...

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...do not be afraid, or your limbs will be fear-bound.
We shall soon reach his lodge....

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...and said as her
brother had directed. But the war party being closely pursued, came up
to...

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...alive. It
may be pleased to hear us talk, and be in our company. ...

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...impatient, she went
in search of it. The young men she found lying within short...

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...with her:
'Who have you got there? I have never seen that woman before in our
village.'...

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...each time.
But when the youngest went, she commenced the work as soon as she
reached the...