Life on the Mississippi, Part 7.

By Mark Twain

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...LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI

...

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...and not in a trance
state. It was a grisly place, that spacious room. There...

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...German; he responded in quite flexible English;
thereafter we gave the German language a permanent rest.

This...

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...we'd only gag them and rob them, not hurt them; or I wouldn't
have come.'

'Shut up...

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...I appeal to the law--I? Does it quench the pauper's thirst if the
King drink...

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...of my attentions. I made myself
limitlessly obliging to these particular men; they could ask me...

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...the right-hand thumb-and-finger-
marks of that unknown murderer, printed with the dearest blood--to me--
that was ever...

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...follow me with it;
and if I got no chance to describe the hiding-place to her...

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...'I have killed him!'

Four years ago, my health began to fail. I had wandered...

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...would not let him. He tried to lift imploring hands, but
they were crossed upon...

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...hands--failed; paused a moment, then feebly tilted
his head, in a meaning way, toward the corpse...

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...me to his
list. No matter--God! how delicious the memory of it!--I caught him
escaping from his...

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...intended journey down the
river, you will hunt out that hidden money, and send it to...

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...him down, and
take all the usefulness out of him, and all the self-respect and
everything, then...

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...Rogers said--

'Who would have had ANY if it hadn't been for me? I flung...

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...it was an astonishing thing to see the Mississippi rolling between
unpeopled shores and straight over...

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...three hundred yards in
three months, so we were told; but the caving banks had already...

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...now from the
cotton-seed, which formerly had little value--none where much
transportation was necessary. In sixteen hundred...

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...they don't know how to raise vegetables
and fruit--'at least the most of them.' Says...

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...Sunday aspect about the
place,' comments Uncle Mumford, with feeling--also with truth.

A Mr. H. furnished some...

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...much costumery on to your statements: always dress
a fact in tights, never in an ulster;'...

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...also, no running to see
steamboats smoking into view in the distance up or down, and...

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...be. When one makes his first voyage in a ship, it
is an experience which...

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...and name the kind of shell it was from the sound of
it, and go on...

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...the longest in my memory, and outlast everything else, little and
big, I reckon, is the...

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...are nobly situated; being very high and commanding a wide
prospect of land and river. ...

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...find and use a chance, here and there, to cripple
and retard their progress. They kept...