Life on the Mississippi, Part 6.

By Mark Twain

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...LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI

...

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...along, everybody for himself and Devil take the
hindmost! and down under the bank they scrambled,...

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...General Polk sent for me, and praised me for my bravery and
gallant conduct. I never...

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... Wherever a
Darnell caught a Watson, or a Watson caught a Darnell, one of 'em...

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...was so thinned out that the old man and his two
sons concluded they'd leave the...

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...near the Kentucky shore; it was clear over against
the opposite shore, a mile away. In...

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...New Madrid. Two steamboats in sight at once!
an infrequent spectacle now in the lonesome...

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...waters, and mingling with
the deep blue of the Mexican Gulf. I never beheld a...

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...the fetid alligator, while the
panther basks at its edge in the cane-brakes, almost impervious to...

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...I looked upon it with that reverence with
which everyone must regard a great feature of...

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...and dozens of big coal barges; also
occasional little trading-scows, peddling along from farm to farm,...

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...the river's teeth; they have rooted out all
the old clusters which made many localities so...

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...making the Mississippi over again
--a job transcended in size by only the original job of...

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...I have been mate of a steamboat--thirty years--I have
watched this river and studied it. ...

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...what they are
trying to do down there at Milliken's Bend. There's been a cut-off...

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... Some believed in the Commission's scheme to arbitrarily and
permanently confine (and thus deepen) the...

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...answer the latter
question. Mississippi Improvement is a mighty topic, down yonder. Every
man on the river...

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...plain to even the uncommercial
mind.




Chapter 29 A Few Specimen Bricks

WE passed through the Plum Point...

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...vulgar rascals compared with this
stately old-time criminal, with his sermons, his meditated insurrections
and city-captures, and...

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...be easily
understood when it is stated that he had MORE THAN A THOUSAND SWORN
CONFEDERATES, all...

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...him when they were journeying together. I ought to
have observed, that the ultimate intentions of...

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...them on and sunk my old shoes in the creek, to atone for them.
I rolled...

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...the hand of his friend, who conducted him to a swamp, and veiled
the tragic scene,...

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...he
describes. It is from Chapter VII, of his book, just published, in
Leipzig, 'Mississippi-Fahrten, von...

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...days of the now forgotten but once renowned and
vigorously hated Mrs. Trollope, Memphis seems to...

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...in desperate weather. Yet I was told that the work
is faithfully performed, in all weathers;...

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...pilot-house. Island No. 63--an
island with a lovely 'chute,' or passage, behind it in the former...

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...stranger, who dropped into
conversation with me--a brisk young fellow, who said he was born in...

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... Finally he shut the door, and started away; halted on the
texas a minute; came...

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...when the sun gets well up, and distributes a
pink flush here and a powder of...

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...by proper manipulation, be made to resemble and
perform the office of any and all oils,...