Life on the Mississippi, Part 5.

By Mark Twain

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...LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI

...

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...although Smith, Jones, and
Johnson are easy names to remember when there is no occasion to...

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...the other foot; here, these remains of activity
are wanting. This has an ominous look.'

By and...

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...suspected that the ranks were thin now, and the
steamboatmen no longer an aristocracy. Why,...

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...doubled its size,
since I was a resident of it, and was now become a city...

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...to describe;' and
therefore was grateful when a German tourist helped him out with the
exclamation--'By ---,...

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...cheap foul doggeries remained, but
business was dull with them; the multitudes of poison-swilling Irishmen
had departed,...

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...St. Louis. There was only one
boat advertised for that section--a Grand Tower packet. Still,...

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...out of him--

They don't drink it, sir. They can't drink it, sir. Give an...

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...temper. I suspected that it might be St.
Genevieve--and so it proved to be. Observe...

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...drifted, by easy stages, into revealments of the river's
marvelous eccentricities of one sort and another,...

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...Ealer, and Billy Youngblood--all A 1 alligator
pilots. THEY could tell alligator water as far...

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...of the South, and you
can't touch him; the alligator is the sacred bird of the...

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...sweetest thing to steer that ever walked the waters. Set her
amidships, in a big...

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...Our trip began auspiciously, with a perfect day, as to breeze
and sunshine, and our boat...

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...for
thoroughness as any similar institution in Missouri! There was another
college higher up on an...

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...the boat's staff is another advantage
achieved by the dress-reform period.

Steered down the bend below Cape...

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...been the next, and some say it was, though I think
it was the same day--he...

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...has gone
into the river from the Missouri point, and the Cairo point has 'made
down' and...