Life on the Mississippi, Part 4.

By Mark Twain

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...LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI

...

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...were trying to swarm aboard. One more moment
later a long array of stage-planks was being...

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...ashore,
and no means left to set the boat afloat in case she got aground. When
the...

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...You should be on board when they take a couple of
those wood-boats in tow and...

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...boat called the 'J. M. White' went from New Orleans to
Cairo in three days, six...

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... " 5...

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... 3
1853 Princess (No. 4) " ...

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... 40
1869 Dexter " ...

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..." " ...

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... H. M.
1852 A. L. Shotwell...

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... " ...

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... 52


...

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...1876 Golden Eagle " " ...

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... ...

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... 18 53
Rodney ...

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...Below St. Francis 2
Memphis ...

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...at wide intervals. The two
hundred-mile stretch from Cairo northward to St. Louis is by...

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...distance. At some
forgotten time in the past, cut-offs were made above Vidalia, Louisiana;
at island...

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...like a knife. By the time the ditch has become
twelve or fifteen feet wide, the...

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...At the end of our fourth effort we brought up in
the woods two miles below...

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...hands.
The fact was soon known at pilot headquarters, and the amusement and
satisfaction of the old...

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...shot, and the first man I
struck told me you had shipped on the "Grand Turk"...

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...can pay off
all my debts! And most especially I wanted HIM to be here when...

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...smooth-shaven, horse-faced,
ignorant, stingy, malicious, snarling, fault hunting, mote-magnifying
tyrant. I early got the habit of coming...

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...to facilitate the operation, then
ejaculated, 'Well, I'll be dod derned!' and returned to his wheel.

What...

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...her all day? Let her go--meet her! meet her!'

Then he would jump from the...

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...the form of an insult.

One day we were approaching New Madrid, bound down and heavily...

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...on the hurricane deck, and
shouted to Brown to stop at some landing or other a...

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...account
with this person while I had the chance; consequently I stuck to him and
pounded him...

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...dropped into his wake; he led the way to his parlor in the forward end
of...

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...the captain did not succeed in
finding another pilot; so he proposed that I should stand...

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...was in the pilot-house-alone, I think; the second engineer
and a striker had the watch in...

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...and every one of his chessmen and the several
joints of his flute.

By this time the...

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...wounded were placed upon pallets on the floor of a great
public hall, and among these...

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...he would tear off handfuls of the
cotton and expose his cooked flesh to view. ...