Life on the Mississippi, Part 12.

By Mark Twain

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...LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI

...

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...frantically at them, and screaming for help, stood the tramp; he
seemed like a black object...

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...say. Quick--out with it--what did I say?'

'Nothing much.'

'It's a lie--you know everything.'

'Everything about what?'

'You...

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...some. The man set fire to the calaboose with those
very matches, and burnt himself...

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...of a
friend of mine, who lives three miles from town. He was to call for...

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...the summer.

Keokuk was easily recognizable. I lived there in 1857--an extraordinary
year there in real-estate...

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...later by the
training of experience and practice. When he was out on a canvass,...

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...on
unembarrassed, and presently delivered a shot which went home, and
silence and attention resulted. He followed...

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...used to know. In fact, I know it has; for I remember it
as a small...

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...region is new; so new that it may be said to be still in its
babyhood....

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...orderly, pleasant to the eye, and
cheering to the spirit; and they are all situated upon...

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...down. A few miles below Dubuque is the Tete de Mort--Death's-
head rock, or bluff--to...

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...goes up again as
soon as you sell it. It makes me shudder to this...

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...rapscallions; no, the whole thing was shoved swiftly
along by a powerful stern-wheeler, modern fashion, and...

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...this excursion into history, he came back to the scenery, and
described it, detail by detail,...

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...may gaze uncounted hours, with rapture unappeased and
unappeasable.

'And so we glide along; in due time...

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...We-no-na
(first-born) was the name of a maiden who had plighted her troth to a
lover belonging...

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...of
this character, with the single exception of the admirable story of
Winona. He granted these...

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... Come
and tell me of your adventures, and what strange lands you have been to
see....

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...miles from New Orleans ended. It is
about a ten-day trip by steamer. It...

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...in this
beautiful edifice represents an ache or a pain, and a handful of sweat,
and hours...

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...of this great truth, and
wander off into astronomy to borrow a symbol. But if...

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...buildings which cost $500,000; there are
six thousand pupils and one hundred and twenty-eight teachers. There...

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...felt that he was cold, and as
he reached back for his blanket, some unseen hand...

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...for the band or the lovers, and as
the young and the old danced about the...

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...BOAT THROUGH THE INUNDATED REGIONS

IT was nine o'clock Thursday morning when the 'Susie' left the
Mississippi...

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...many have been stolen by piratical negroes, who take them
where they will bring the greatest...

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...it was impossible to get that fuel at any
point to be touched during the expedition,...

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...dark, as it was not prudent to run, a place alongside the woods was
hunted and...

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...tendency of the current up the Black is toward
the west. In fact, so much is...

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...spoke of the gallant work of many of the people in
their attempts to save their...

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...and the water is eight and nine
feet deep in the houses. A strong current...

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...was in danger, and his family were all in it. We
steamed there immediately, and...

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...time ago, there yet remains a large quantity,
which General York, who is working with indomitable...

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...has three boats
chartered, with flats in tow, but the demand for these to tow out...

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...State do where the people are under subjection
to rates of interest ranging from 18 to...

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...mud of the river settles
under their shelter, and finally slope them back at the angle...

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...is to raise the surface; but this, by inducing
greater velocity of flow, inevitably causes an...

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...one of the cases
of destruction incident to war, which may well be repaired by the...

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...be received testily. The
extraordinary features of the business were, first, the excess of the
rage...

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...course, with letters of introduction to the
most distinguished individuals, and with the still more influential
recommendation...

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...own secret
hearts, how infinitely more they lay at his mercy than he has chosen to
betray;...

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...not at home, and I will stay but a moment to catch hold of it....

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...when I shall be freed
from this situation, and I shall have to undergo many sore...

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...tracked.'
And he told them to keep close to each other for fear of losing
themselves, as...

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...dearly (i.e.
wampum), to obtain which, the warriors whose bones we saw, sacrificed
their lives. You...

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...spoke to the old man who sat in the lodge,
saying, 'Nemesho, help us; we claim...

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...they saw the lodge of the old manito. They
entered immediately and claimed his protection,...

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...circuit of the
lake. Meantime the party remained stationary in the center to watch his
movements....

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...day the sister saw the eyes of the head brighten, as if with
pleasure. At...

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...she had been told; and, before she
had expended the paints and feathers, the bear began...

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...pleasure.
One day, while busy in their encampment, they were unexpectedly attacked
by unknown Indians. The...

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...she walked in different directions,
till she came to the place from whence the head had...

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...lodge sat
one of those young men who are always forward, and fond of boasting and
displaying...

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...woman carried off the head.

The young people and the sister heard the young woman coming...