Life on the Mississippi, Part 10.

By Mark Twain

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...LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI

...

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...the
romantic mysteries, the kings and knights and big-sounding titles, and
Mardi-Gras would die, down there in...

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...the war; and it was he,
also, that made these gentlemen value these bogus decorations. For...

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...of
three or four widely-known literary names, the South ought to have a
dozen or two--and will...

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...Brer
Rabbit ourselves.

Mr. Harris ought to be able to read the negro dialect better than
anybody else,...

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...Sellers' in future editions.




Chapter 48 Sugar and Postage

ONE day, on the street, I encountered the...

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...reaches the
required spot; then it stands still and by means of a wire rope pulls
the...

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...sand into it.

We could have gone down to the mouth of the river and visited...

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...some three miles and knocked a
tree down with him which was four feet through at...

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...true?

A. Yes.

Q. Then name the day of the month.

(Much fumbling with pencil, on the part...

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...some
other source. Doubtless they chose farming because that life is private
and secluded from irruptions of...

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...intellectual end of the captain was in it, but such
was not the case. The...

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...to stick to the
wheel, and die there when occasion requires. In a Memphis graveyard is
buried...

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...out with alacrity,
and left the bear in sole possession. He presently grew lonesome, and
started out...

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...MRS. GEORGE JOHNSON!

And there was no such person. The young sinners fled forth then,...

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...easy matter; but how different on one of our palaces of
the present day.

'In 1827 we...

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...WOULD swell, and brag, and lie, and date back--ten, fifteen,
twenty years,--and how they did enjoy...

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...so chanced that one of these paragraphs--{footnote [The original MS.
of it, in the captain's own...

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...succeeded, it would not be modest in me to say.

The captain had an honorable pride...