Life on the Mississippi, Part 1.

By Mark Twain

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...LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI

...

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...much water as the St. Lawrence, twenty-five times as much as
the Rhine, and three hundred...

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...of country, without any trouble at all--one hundred and twenty
thousand years. Yet it is much...

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... We can glance briefly at its slumbrous
first epoch in a couple of short chapters;...

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...preservers than holiness; lax court morals
and the absurd chivalry business were in full feather, and...

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...one to
explore the creek, and the other fourteen to hunt for each other.

For more than...

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...the monopoly of buffalo hides. He spent
several years and about all of his money,...

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...a fire to cook
their evening meal; then extinguished it, embarked again, paddled some
way farther, and...

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...feast, and plenty of pleasant palaver and
fol-de-rol.

They had proved to their satisfaction, that the Mississippi...

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...just been robbed of. And also, by signs, La Salle drew from these
simple children...

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...from its frozen northern springs to the sultry borders of
the Gulf; from the woody ridges...

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...were not open to him,
he took a berth on a Pittsburgh coal-flat, or on a...

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...down to the big
raft and crawl aboard and listen--they would talk about Cairo, because
they would...

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...chawin-up's done;' and flung
his hat down, which was all over ribbons, and says, 'You lay...

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...sleep with the thunder!
When I'm cold, I bile the Gulf of Mexico and bathe in...

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...family, if he had one.

Both of them was edging away in different directions, growling and
shaking...

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...has fits; and next
about differences betwixt clear-water rivers and muddy-water ones. The
man they called Ed...

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...says, "ain't that Buck Miller's place, over yander
in the bend."

'"Yes," says I, "it is--why." ...

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...what Dick said. It floated right along abreast, now, and
didn't gain any more. ...

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...in the middle of it another man tripped
and sprained his ankle, and had to knock...

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...kill Dick Allbright, because he'd seen the bar'l on
other trips, and that had an ugly...

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...shedding tears?' says Bob; 'was it Allbright or the baby?'

'Why, Allbright, of course; didn't I...

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...less heave him overboard!'

'No,' says Big Bob, 'less get out the paint-pot and paint him...

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...of the bend. But
I warn't born in her. It's our first trip.'

'Now you're talking!...

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...to myself now, just as it was then: the white
town drowsing in the sunshine...

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...the blackest smoke are
rolling and tumbling out of the chimneys--a husbanded grandeur created
with a bit...

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...boat was laid up he would
come home and swell around the town in his blackest...

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...hundred
and fifty to two hundred and fifty dollars a month, and no board to pay.
Two...

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...lands and distant climes
which I never have felt in so uplifting a degree since. I...

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...monarch could not have been more astounded than the mate
was. He even stopped swearing. ...

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...official connected with the
boat--the night watchman. He snubbed my advances at first, but I
presently...

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...an untraveled native of the
wilds of Illinois, who had absorbed wildcat literature and appropriated
its marvels,...