Life on the Mississippi

By Mark Twain

Page 0

...Allan




LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI

By Mark Twain




TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER I. The Mississippi is Well worth Reading...

Page 1

...Man is Missing.--The Young Man is Discouraged.--
Specimen Water.--A Fine Quality of Smoke.--A Supreme Mistake.--We
Inspect the...

Page 2

...Meal.

CHAPTER XLI. The Approaches to New Orleans.--A Stirring
Street.--Sanitary Improvements.--Journalistic Achievements.--Cisterns
and Wells.

CHAPTER XLII. Beautiful Grave-yards.--Chameleons and
Panaceas.--Inhumation...

Page 3

...which in many aspects form a part
of it, this basin contains about 1,250,000 square miles....

Page 4

...Austria, Italy,
and Turkey; and almost all this wide region is fertile; the Mississippi
valley, proper, is...

Page 5

...have been retired to the country by that
cut-off. A cut-off plays havoc with boundary lines...

Page 6

...that De Soto, the first white man who ever saw the Mississippi
River, saw it in...

Page 7

...started. When De Soto stood on the
banks of the Mississippi, it was still two years...

Page 8

...its course,
proportions, and locality were hardly even guessable. The mere
mysteriousness of the matter ought to...

Page 9

...an outfit of priests. De Soto had twenty-four
with him. La Salle had several, also. The...

Page 10

...They found them, by
and by, and were hospitably received and well treated--if to be received
by...

Page 11

...the
Mississippi and turned their prows southward. They plowed through the
fields of floating ice, past the...

Page 12

...on that spot, the future Napoleon;
and by and by Napoleon himself was to give the...

Page 13

...throne
of England, America had become an independent nation, Louis XIV. and
Louis XV. had rotted and...

Page 14

...in, in this place, a
chapter from a book which I have been working at, by...

Page 15

...moving. One man was singing--roaring,
you may say; and it wasn't a nice song--for a parlor...

Page 16

...little circle, tucking
up his wrist-bands, and now and then straightening up and beating his
breast with...

Page 17

...Bob; next, the Child of Calamity chipped in
again, bigger than ever; then they both got...

Page 18

...and just then
there was a loud order to stand by for a crossing, and some...

Page 19

...the Mississippi on a rise when the Ohio is
low, you'll find a wide band of...

Page 20

...to your
eyes. How can you tell it's an empty bar'l?" He says--

'"I don't know; I...

Page 21

...the wind begin to moan around, and
next the lightning begin to play and the thunder...

Page 22

...then, just then the
sky split wide open, with a crash, and the lightning killed two...

Page 23

...said he used to live up at the head of this bend, and one night...

Page 24

...aft cussing to himself, and they
yelling and jeering at him, and roaring and laughing so...

Page 25

...ain't up to anything wrong. What _is_ your name?'

'Aleck Hopkins, sir. Aleck James Hopkins.'

'Well, Aleck,...

Page 26

...transient
ambitions of other sorts, but they were only transient. When a circus
came and went, it...

Page 27

...they are seeing for the first time. And
the boat _is_ rather a handsome sight, too....

Page 28

...to be contemplated as real possibilities. By and by one of our
boys went away. He...

Page 29

...battered up and bandaged, a shining hero,
stared at and wondered over by everybody, it seemed...

Page 30

...I never was great in matters of
detail. I packed my valise, and took passage on...

Page 31

...trifle of notice from the big stormy mate, and I was on the alert
for an...

Page 32

...it! There! there! Aft again! aft
again! don't you hear me. Dash it to dash! are...

Page 33

...get him the position of
'loblolly-boy in a ship;' and from that point my watchman threw...

Page 34

...the great
Mississippi River with the easy confidence of my time of life. If I had
really...

Page 35

...were monotonously unpicturesque. I hoped Mr. Bixby would
change the subject. But no; he would crowd...

Page 36

...away and ever so vague and indistinct. The mate said:--

'We've got to land at Jones's...

Page 37

...stupidest
dunderhead I ever saw or ever heard of, so help me Moses! The idea of
you...

Page 38

...waited to see. Mr. Bixby handled the
engine bells, and in due time the boat's nose...

Page 39

...take heart once more to believe
that piloting was a romantic sort of occupation after all....

Page 40

...them
constantly ran up and down inspecting the river, not because they ever
really hoped to get...

Page 41

...a half.'

'Pretty square crossing, an't it?'

'Yes, but the upper bar 's working down fast.'

Another pilot...

Page 42

...darkness would overtake us a good long way above
the mouth. This was a great misfortune,...

Page 43

...bend. More looks were
exchanged, and nods of surprised admiration--but no words. Insensibly
the men drew together...

Page 44

...the engineer--

'Stand by, now!'

'Aye-aye, sir!'

'Seven-and-a-half! Seven feet! Six-and--'

We touched bottom! Instantly Mr. Bixby set a...

Page 45

...went off with a bang, of course,
and then went on loading and firing until he...

Page 46

...well that
in reality there is a curve there), and that wall falls back and makes
way...

Page 47

...I thought it was making down a little, last trip. Meet any boats?'

'Met one abreast...

Page 48

...entire preposterousness of the thing to filter into Mr.
Bixby's system, and then I judge it...

Page 49

...Bixby. He said--

'That's the very main virtue of the thing. If the shapes didn't change
every...

Page 50

...slush-bucket and a brush; I'm only
fit for a roustabout. I haven't got brains enough to...

Page 51

...When
she fights strong and the tiller slips a little, in a jerky, greasy sort
of way,...

Page 52

...admired in Bixby and other great
pilots. Once I inspected rather long, and when I faced...

Page 53

...when he wants to wood up.'

I went on consuming and said I wasn't after wood.

'Indeed?...

Page 54

...largest capitals, with a string of shouting exclamation points at
the end of it; for it...

Page 55

...face; another day came when I ceased altogether
to note them. Then, if that sunset scene...

Page 56

...to vast streams like
the Mississippi and the Missouri, whose alluvial banks cave and change
constantly, whose...

Page 57

...lie? The bank would tell you so, and then
you'd stir those leadsmen up a bit....

Page 58

...river; we'll creep through cracks
where you've always thought was solid land; we'll dart through the...

Page 59

...that we
held the conversation above narrated, we met a great rise coming down
the river. The...

Page 60

...and receive a tempest of missiles and profanity, one of our
wheels would walk off with...

Page 61

...be
cramping up around a bar, while a string of these small-fry rascals
were drifting down into...

Page 62

...farms, and wretcheder
little log-cabins; there were crazy rail fences sticking a foot or two
above the...

Page 63

...or row of ornamental China-trees. The timber
is shorn off clear to the rear of the...

Page 64

...pilot on the
river, a Mr. X., who was a somnambulist. It was said that if...

Page 65

...observed this marvel of steering, he wished
he had not confessed! He stared, and wondered, and...

Page 66

...man would walk a pavement; and I put him to bed;
now just this minute there...

Page 67

...buoy!' and over she goes. If the pilot
is not satisfied, he sounds the place again;...

Page 68

...of wavelets is dancing in the sun. It is such grandeur, too, to
the cub, to...

Page 69

...turned, and said--

'Now just for that, you can go and get the sounding-pole yourself. I...

Page 70

...were prepared and knew
what to do; at my chiefs order they sprang at the right...

Page 71

...buoy he fell
away and watched it till it seemed to be secure; then he took...

Page 72

...the crossing-stones, and the varying depth of mud in each of
those numberless places, you will...

Page 73

...walking
and talking with a friend, and another friend at your side kept up a
monotonous repetition...

Page 74

...when she sunk; it was three years before that, on the 2nd of
December; Asa Hardy...

Page 75

...together with recitals of congratulatory verses and obituary poetry
provoked by the same: then this memory...

Page 76

...how to meet them; all his
knowledge forsakes him; and within fifteen minutes he is as...

Page 77

...my audience; and before I got to the head of
the island I had fifteen or...

Page 78

...I'll
never hear the last of how I was ass enough to heave the lead at...

Page 79

...the
sole and unquestioned control of the pilot. He could do with her exactly
as he pleased,...

Page 80

...of particularly high reputation, he
took pains to keep him. When wages were four hundred dollars...

Page 81

...young negro, who aired his
importance with balmy complacency, and was greatly courted by the circle
in...

Page 82

...was anything like it. Now you may
believe it or not, but as sure as I...

Page 83

...in toward shore than it is out here in the middle?'

'Yes, I reckon it is;...

Page 84

...this seems a fitting place to say a few
words about an organization which the pilots...

Page 85

...no dues required from the unemployed.

Also, the widows of deceased members in good standing could...

Page 86

...end to the fun which that poor martyr had to put up
with.

However, it is a...

Page 87

...new victim fell; every day some outraged captain
discharged a non-association pet, with tears and profanity,...

Page 88

...soon as the
first crossing, out from St. Louis, was completed, the items would be
entered upon...

Page 89

...the next. He has
no time or words to waste if he would keep 'posted.'

But the...

Page 90

...'No' in person and before
witnesses; so it took weeks to decide a candidacy, because many...

Page 91

...widow and orphan list grew, but so did the association's financial
resources. The association attended its...

Page 92

...any
captain employed a non-association pilot, he should be forced to
discharge him, and also pay a...

Page 93

...with reticules and bandboxes were trying to keep up with
husbands freighted with carpet-sacks and crying...

Page 94

...forecastle lit up with
the red glare of the torch-baskets. Racing was royal fun. The public
always...

Page 95

...that all work could be quickly
done.

The chosen date being come, and all things in readiness,...

Page 96

...intervals. I had the documents
for these occurrences, but through carelessness they have been mislaid.
This boat,...

Page 97

...of the Mississippi
River; that is, the nine or ten hundred miles stretching from Cairo,
Illinois, southward...

Page 98

...To do the same thing a hundred and
seventy-six years ago, one had to go a...

Page 99

...time for the people thereabouts to move. The water
cleaves the banks away like a knife....

Page 100

...we plunged
athwart the current. At the end of our fourth effort we brought up
in the...

Page 101

...had changed hands.
The fact was soon known at pilot headquarters, and the amusement and
satisfaction of...

Page 102

...shipped on the "Grand Turk" and gone to New
Orleans. Well, sir, I had to lean...

Page 103

...faithful friend,--my benefactor, I've found the method! I've found
the method to pay off all my...

Page 104

...good a time I might have been having with the off-watch
below, and no matter how...

Page 105

...me now as it was then. It must have
been all of fifteen minutes--fifteen minutes of...

Page 106

...wasn't. Ritchie
had steeled for Brown the season before; consequently he knew exactly
how to entertain himself...

Page 107

...me. I wondered what shape it was going to
take. By and by he stepped back...

Page 108

...spoken; but as I had only one, it seemed judicious to take
care of it; so...

Page 109

...helm! However, Eagle Bend was two miles wide at this bank-full
stage, and correspondingly long and...

Page 110

...no one at the wheel?'

'Yes, sir.'

'Did you strike him first?'

'Yes, sir.'

'What with?'

'A stool, sir.'

'Hard?'

'Middling, sir.'

'Did...

Page 111

...passage to St. Louis, and
said he would find a new pilot there and my steersman's...

Page 112

...now, Ealer rang to 'come ahead' full
steam, and the next moment four of the eight...

Page 113

...frantic herd of frightened immigrants till the wounded
could be brought there and placed in safety...

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...new and strange to
me. Two long rows of prostrate forms--more than forty, in all--and every
face...

Page 115

...of his thirst,
tempted him almost beyond his strength; but he mastered himself and
threw it away,...

Page 116

...I should not be as free to go and come, talk,
inquire, and spy around, as...

Page 117

...an iron-clad belief in
Adam and the biblical history of creation, which has not suffered from
the...

Page 118

...in disguise. I saw there none of the swell airs and graces, and
ostentatious displays of...

Page 119

...around town in the rain. The city seemed but
little changed. It _was _greatly changed, but...

Page 120

...be repeated, now.
The 'Catholic New Church' was the only notable building then, and Mr.
Murray was...

Page 121

...there was a rich abundance of mud. All this was familiar
and satisfying; but the ancient...

Page 122

...easy one to follow, twenty years ago--but not now. There are wide
intervals between boats, these...

Page 123

...a character,
and much better company than the sappy literature he was selling. A
random remark, connecting...

Page 124

...town; I couldn't place it, couldn't call its
name. So I lost part of my temper....

Page 125

...strain, and he pulled through all
right. He drifted, by easy stages, into revealments of the...

Page 126

...George Ealer, and Billy Youngblood--all A-1 alligator
pilots. _They _could tell alligator water as far as...

Page 127

...of the Government, and
you've got to let him alone.'

'Do you ever get aground on the...

Page 128

...to do. She would hold herself on a star
all night, if you let her alone....

Page 129

...and is otherwise marching on. At Grand Tower, too,
there was a railway; and another at...

Page 130

...was the
Athens of Missouri, and contained several colleges besides those already
mentioned; and all of them...

Page 131

...through, in low water.

Thebes, at the head of the Grand Chain, and Commerce at the...

Page 132

...river it used to be in,
except that it was between St. Louis and Cairo somewhere....

Page 133

...paid no
attention to our whistle and then tried to cross our bows. By doing some
strong...

Page 134

...PILOT'S FIRST BATTLE

He said--

It was the 7th of November. The fight began at seven in...

Page 135

...leave there. So
I climbed up the guy and got on the floor again. About that...

Page 136

...I don't think there is. Some says it was about a horse or a
cow--anyway, it...

Page 137

...and killed him. Don't remember whether it was
the Darnells and Watsons, or one of the...

Page 138

...speaks blemishless grammar; no one has ever written
it--_no_ one, either in the world or out...

Page 139

...away, and shelterless men and cattle forced to take refuge
on scattering elevations here and there...

Page 140

...glimpse of the object I had so long wished to
behold, and felt myself amply repaid...

Page 141

...dwell upon as
it sweeps along, nor can you wander upon its banks, or trust yourself
without...

Page 142

...'impervious to man.'

Later still comes Alexander Mackay, of the Middle Temple, Barrister at
Law, with a...

Page 143

...the vast
countries watered by it, in the name of the King. The column bore this
inscription--

LOUIS...

Page 144

...than on a spread of formless blackness that won't
stay still; and money is saved to...

Page 145

...away the romance of our calling; the Company has
taken away its state and dignity.

Plum Point...

Page 146

...have here and there
left out remarks which were addressed to the men, such as 'where...

Page 147

...that island, it will foreclose, sure, pegs or no pegs.
Away down yonder, they have driven...

Page 148

...that will make
navigation just simply perfect, and absolutely safe and profitable; and
all the days will...

Page 149

...he will cure you of any other of the five
theories that may have previously got...

Page 150

...made the usual speed of fast freight lines, it
would take one whole summer to put...

Page 151

...modest genius dreamed of no loftier flight than the planning
of raids upon cars, coaches, and...

Page 152

...a breach of trust, the owner of the property can only have redress
by a civil...

Page 153

...have been all true; and although some blame Mr. Stewart for having
violated his oath, they...

Page 154

...and a number of papers that I did not take time to
examine. I sunk the...

Page 155

...him in the creek.

'He had sold the other negro the third time on Arkansaw River...

Page 156

...a picture of Memphis, at that disastrous time, drawn by a German
tourist who seems to...

Page 157

...tourists used to put into their books
long time ago. In the days of the now...

Page 158

...a great distance to discharge
his trust,--and often in desperate weather. Yet I was told that...

Page 159

...in the pilot-house. Island No. 63--an
island with a lovely 'chute,' or passage, behind it in...

Page 160

...fellow, who said he was born in a
town in the interior of Wisconsin, and had...

Page 161

...minute; came slowly back and stood in the door again, with that
grieved look in his...

Page 162

...haze where it will yield the best effect, you
grant that you have seen something that...

Page 163

...of the originals. Sagacious people shipped it to Italy,
doctored it, labeled it, and brought it...

Page 164

...it good common sense to do the errand in daytime, when, by a little
sacrifice of...

Page 165

...that pallid company who,
waking out of death, shall make a movement--for any, even the slightest,
movement...

Page 166

...two
months, he one day said, abruptly--

'I will tell you my story.'

A DYING MAN S CONFESSION

Then...

Page 167

...Show a light, we want water.'

'The captain's voice, by G--!' said the stage-whispering ruffian,
and both...

Page 168

...a slant in a definite direction
to begin with: Those two robbers were manifestly soldiers in...

Page 169

...as opportunity
offered.

My apparatus was simple: a little red paint and a bit of white paper....

Page 170

...You are being dogged: within five days both of you
will be assassinated.'

He dropped on his...

Page 171

...picket-watch outside the town--mere
discipline and ceremony--no occasion for it, no enemy around.

Toward midnight I set...

Page 172

...I had ever heard
it.

I gathered myself together and flew to the corpse-room. About midway
down the...

Page 173

...you see you have delayed too long--it is gone by. There--it is dying
out. It is...

Page 174

...a sip of brandy. This was necessary, on account of the cold. But I
did it...

Page 175

...and most sorrowfully, for I had wanted it for Kruger's son.

Last night, when I consented...

Page 176

...said. But I heard Rogers answer--

'Yes, it seems so to me. It ought to be...

Page 177

...to leave
him undisturbed. That is real friendship, that is true friendship. We
could follow other courses...

Page 178

...shred nor shingle of it, except the fag-end of a shanty
and one brick chimney. This...

Page 179

...Mississippi. A chap established a whiskey shop there, without a
Mississippi license, and enriched himself upon...

Page 180

...dealer's share
of that crop is about 25 per cent.'{footnote ['But what can the State do
where...

Page 181

...humane and
protective treatment of its laborers, that its method is the most
profitable for both planter...

Page 182

...son a steamboat bar, left him a fortune. Now he
leaves him board and lodging; yes,...

Page 183

...have been mistaken, as to that
particular, but knew he had seen them around the polls...

Page 184

...materials out of which to
reproduce it:--

Population, twenty-seven thousand soldiers and three thousand
non-combatants; the city utterly...

Page 185

...or unfortunate
experiences of one would be of interest to all?

Those are the materials furnished by...

Page 186

...stopped to get that
game-bag before she shoved along again! Was getting used to things
already, you...

Page 187

...bombardment; we've got
hold of a pint of prime wh--.' Whiskey, I was going to say,...

Page 188

...the
bombardment, sickness, captivity, famine.

The most beautiful of all the national cemeteries is here. Over the
great...

Page 189

...increased population and wealth, and in
the intellectual advancement and the liberalizing of opinion which go
naturally...

Page 190

...some
frequency, for they gambled in an upper-deck stateroom every day and
night, and in my promenades...

Page 191

...somewhat of
diffidence--

'Triangle, would you mind coming down to my stateroom a minute, and have
a little...

Page 192

..._would
_they say to it in _Ohio_. Wouldn't their eyes bug out, to see 'em
handled like...

Page 193

...so good and so ahead of anything he had ever
run across before. Surreptitious smiles, at...

Page 194

...on the
table, and said with mocking gentleness--

'Five thousand dollars better, my friend from the rural...

Page 195

...afterward confirmed
this news, and said that Mr. Gray was improving and would get well.
Later letters...

Page 196

...an inherited and unchangeable
plan; among them, Tupper, much penciled; also, 'Friendship's Offering,'
and 'Affection's Wreath,' with...

Page 197

...of the Prodigal Son. In big gilt frame, slander
of the family in oil: papa holding...

Page 198

...special sacredness--an outrage in water-color, done
by the young niece that came on a visit long...

Page 199

...and satisfactory
estate. Now cake her over with a layer of ancient and obdurate dirt,
and you...

Page 200

...her. And like Vicksburg and New
Orleans, she has her ice-factory: she makes thirty tons of...

Page 201

...terms there, if one take less than three hundred and fifty
pounds at a delivery.

The Rosalie...

Page 202

...entire trade. Yes, and the
hotel trade, too. You are going to see the day, pretty...

Page 203

...want to, and there ain't anybody
that can detect the true from the false. Well, we...

Page 204

...survive along with it. It is pathetic enough, that a
whitewashed castle, with turrets and things--materials...

Page 205

...O'Connor
he should not live. It seems that Mabry was armed and O'Connor was not.
The cause...

Page 206

...the community;
knowing that the law was powerless, in the actual condition of public
sentiment, to protect...

Page 207

...before we were weary of
looking at them.'

Captain Basil Hall--

'The district of country which lies adjacent...

Page 208

...which had had a kind of
Aladdin's lamp experience, however, since I had seen them; for...

Page 209

...has begun--just this moment, as one may say. When
completed, the new Cotton Exchange will be...

Page 210

...thousand words. That is to say,
not much short of three times as many words as...

Page 211

...placed there by the pious hands of bereaved parents and
children, husbands and wives, and renewed...

Page 212

...compound. A
Saint can never _quite _return the principal, however; for his dead body
_kills _people, whereas...

Page 213

...[Four or five dollars is the minimum
cost.]}--so cheap until the poor got to imitating the...

Page 214

...is. Five years ago, lodged in an attic; live in a swell
house now, with a...

Page 215

...shall go to heaven in the twin to it, if it takes the last
rap the...

Page 216

...is worth a cool six hundred--that's what _he's_ worth. There ain't
anything equal to it but...

Page 217

...jog through that old quarter is a vivid pleasure. And you
have a vivid sense as...

Page 218

...on the other; and here and
there, in the distance, a ragged and angular-limbed and moss-bearded
cypress,...

Page 219

...aspect in a very few
minutes. But the girls themselves wouldn't; so nothing would be really
gained,...

Page 220

...the curt Yes, and the abrupt No, they
say 'Yes, Suh', 'No, Suh.'

But there are some...

Page 221

...a spool of thread, gives the
governor--I don't know what he gives the governor; support, likely.

When...

Page 222

...in
his own person, by that tremendous episode. It gives the inexperienced
stranger a better idea of...

Page 223

...dead already. But the poet resurrected it, and gave it
a new start.

A brief dispute followed,...

Page 224

...more.

I did not see the end of the battle. I forced myself to endure it
as...

Page 225

...differs
from that. For instance--

The 'Times-Democrat' sent a relief-steamer up one of the bayous, last
April. This...

Page 226

...the mule. Since I left him, I have rummaged around
and found a full report of...

Page 227

...contest, and robbed it of one of its
best features--variety. But every now and then somebody...

Page 228

...that in these latter days the
spectacle is mightily augmented, as to cost, splendor, and variety.
There...

Page 229

...the
world in debt to them for these great and permanent services to liberty,
humanity, and progress.

Then...

Page 230

...may observe, by one or two signs, how deeply that influence
penetrated, and how strongly it...

Page 231

...whose outside
tallied with this bill of particulars. He was said to be very shy. He
is...

Page 232

...I had an experience of the same sort when we wrote
the book called 'The Gilded...

Page 233

...down the river
fifty-four miles, in a swift tug, to ex-Governor Warmouth's sugar
plantation. Strung along below...

Page 234

...half and from that to two tons,
to the acre; which is three or four times...

Page 235

...pathetic song.
He cackled it out with hideous energy after 'Home again, home again from
a foreign...

Page 236

...spend an eternity in
frivolous employments, and accept it as happiness, are so fastidious
about frivolous questions...

Page 237

...these for
his amusement in the realms of everlasting contentment, and for the
amazement and admiration of...

Page 238

...farm into
the hands of an agricultural expert to be worked on shares--out of every
three loads...

Page 239

...over the breast-board
with his clothing in flames, and was the last person to get ashore....

Page 240

...wheel; that
another and very particular friend, whom I had steered many trips for,
had stepped out...

Page 241

...generosities, and pretty conspicuously promising to
fool his possibilities away early, and come to nothing. In...

Page 242

...fact added
some trifle of stiffening to his natural dignity, which had been
sufficiently stiff in its...

Page 243

...thirty-five years, we ascertain, by
reference to the diary, he has made four hundred and sixty...

Page 244

...Illinois side.'

The old gentleman was not of literary turn or capacity, but he used
to jot...

Page 245

...the thoughts of so great a man as Captain
Sellers, and I had wit enough to...

Page 246

...the shoreward sights--as if there had been no
break in my river life. There was a...

Page 247

...with a leaden tinge
from the solid cloud-bank overhead. The river was leaden; all distances
the same;...

Page 248

...that they mistook this superb artificial day
for the genuine article. We had a delightful trip...

Page 249

...I was a Roman soldier.'

'Which one?'

'Why didn't you see them Roman soldiers that stood back...

Page 250

...at that time, in a boarding-house, and
had this young fellow for a neighbor across the...

Page 251

...other 250,000 must be classified as Protestants. Out
of these 250,000, according to this questionable telegram,...

Page 252

...State prison for
the term of nine years, as I have before said. In the prison...

Page 253

...When
we got to Chicago on the cars from there to here, I pulled off an...

Page 254

...he shook hands with me and gave me a $50 green back, & my
asking the...

Page 255

...with me & now i didn't fear
no one giving me a back cap (_exposing his...

Page 256

...when you get out
i no, & you are the man i think most of in...

Page 257

...way through,
on a lame and broken voice; yet he had tried to fortify his feelings
by...

Page 258

...and weeks beyond this stage of the affair. My friend came back
from the woods, and...

Page 259

...much less one
unsanctified, could ever have written. As showing the work of grace in
a human...

Page 260

...father is a minister of the gospel.
His name is an assumed one. I am glad...

Page 261

...that city again, I would seek out that excellent man and kiss
the hem of his...

Page 262

...sense of what the
Bastille prisoners must have felt when they used to come out and...

Page 263

...on an early morning walk, came along, and we
discussed the weather, and then drifted into...

Page 264

...was a perfect chucklehead; perfect dummy; just
a stupid ass, as you may say. Everybody knew...

Page 265

...could call to mind, I finally
inquired about _myself_:

'Oh, he succeeded well enough--another case of damned...

Page 266

...notice for years.
I felt that I was not only one of those people, but the...

Page 267

...book by an angel who was
wiser than I and did not trust such important matters...

Page 268

...but he was exasperatingly good, and had a prodigious
memory. One Sunday he made himself the...

Page 269

...down. The water was so muddy I
could not see anything, but I felt around among...

Page 270

...my way through town to the hotel, I saw the house which was my home
when...

Page 271

...visitors used to insult me with when
I was a pupil there; and I was sorry...

Page 272

...observable were with the women, not
the men. I saw men whom thirty years had changed...

Page 273

...human beings!'

The effect which this had upon me was an inspiration to him, and he
turned...

Page 274

...scum that
bear the hated name of Lynch.'

That was it. He had been hunting down the...

Page 275

...he was a hero to me no longer, but only
a poor, foolish, exposed humbug. I...

Page 276

...into a
copper cylinder filled with alcohol, and this was suspended in one of
the dismal avenues...

Page 277

...black object set against a sun, so white and intense was
the light at his back....

Page 278

...About _that_.'

'About _what_?--I don't know what you are talking about. I think you are
sick or...

Page 279

...think?'

'Let me see. The man was drunk?'

'Yes, he was drunk.'

'Very drunk?'

'Yes.'

'And the boy knew it?'

'Yes,...

Page 280

...time is mos' an hour en a half slower in de country en what it...

Page 281

...salable, and at a
figure which would still have been high if the ground had been...

Page 282

...incident concerning
Dean--

The war feeling was running high in Keokuk (in '61), and a great
mass meeting...

Page 283

...unwound his black bandage and cast it away, still
thundering; presently discarded the bob tailed coat...

Page 284

...that he was the only member of the
family I had met; but that did not...

Page 285

...home and
written his book, believing he had seen all of the river that was worth
seeing...

Page 286

...has
the usual Upper River quota of factories, newspapers, and institutions
of learning; she has telephones, local...

Page 287

...military uniform, and
with a Christian cane in his hand, but deposited in the grave in...

Page 288

...the freight business so
heavy, that the boats were not able to keep up with the...

Page 289

...as of noonday
intensified. The effect was strange, and fine, and very striking.

We passed Prairie du...

Page 290

...virgin atmospheres that have
known no other contact save that of angels' wings.

'And next we glide...

Page 291

...stride in the
van of progress, banner-bearer of the highest and newest civilization,
carving his beneficent way...

Page 292

...business, as you say. And moreover,
there is a startling kind of dramatic surprise about it...

Page 293

...the Indian imagination. He said that this tale,
and most of the others in the book,...

Page 294

...breath blows them away.
The birds get up from the water, and fly to a distant...

Page 295

...was established thirty-six years ago;
and by and by, when the postmaster received a letter, he...

Page 296

...it is about seven hundred feet above
the sea level. It is so high that a...

Page 297

...buildings
stretching between them and uniting them that a stranger will not be
able to tell where...

Page 298

...idiotic
Indian legend. I would resist the temptation to print it here, if I
could, but the...

Page 299

...being detected, they talked almost in a whisper, and now, that they
might get back to...

Page 300

...rams his knife into the
bear, and saves--whom, the blanket? No--nothing of the sort. You get
yourself...

Page 301

...the woods look bright and fresh, but this pleasant aspect to the eye
is neutralized by...

Page 302

...large portion of this was under cultivation,
particularly along the Mississippi and back of the Red....

Page 303

...did not
complain, except on account of losing their stock, and promptly brought
a supply of wood...

Page 304

...nearer the mouth, but the same
scene presented itself--smoke-houses drifting out in the pastures,
negro quarters anchored...

Page 305

...in the water, perfectly impassive. They did not
move in their places, but stood patiently waiting...

Page 306

...together, sheep, hogs, horses, mules, and cattle. One of
these mounds has been used for many...

Page 307

...with the General, your reporter was pulled up to a little
house of two rooms, in...

Page 308

...the many. After weeks of
privation and suffering, people still cling to their houses and leave
only...

Page 309

...was necessary to sustain
life. It is needless to say he is not popular now on...

Page 310

...that can only be
appreciated when seen, and complete demoralization has set in.

If rations are drawn...

Page 311

...on the question
of hydrography), of the United States Coast Survey; B. B. Harrod,
the State Engineer...

Page 312

...be set back a short distance
from the revetted bank; but it is, in effect, the...

Page 313

...be a necessity;
but as the bottom is yielding, and the best form of outlet is...

Page 314

...desire for approbation, and a delicate sensitiveness under
censure, have always, I believe, been considered as...

Page 315

...none of them, ever thought of translating Obadiah's
curse into classic American; if they had done...

Page 316

...would leave on the mind of his
readers a correct impression, at the least cost of...

Page 317

...must cook for yourself, and I will for
myself. When you are ill, do not attempt...

Page 318

...the door. Now and then I will speak to you, but not often.' His
sister again...

Page 319

...assemble on a
certain night, when they would depart immediately. Mudjikewis was loud
in his demands for...

Page 320

...to the
place where they were now going, some of whom had retreated as far back
as...

Page 321

...of instant death, when I saw a small lodge, with
smoke curling from its top. An...

Page 322

...they had received
food from the old man: but very soon the bear came in sight,...

Page 323

...And so it was, even as he had said.
Coming to the lake, they saw the...

Page 324

...not, do not be afraid, or your limbs will be fear-bound.
We shall soon reach his...

Page 325

...being closely pursued, came
up to the lodge. She invited them in, and placed the meat...

Page 326

...meantime
take food to our sister.' They went and requested the head. She told
them to take...

Page 327

...wounds. Various other bodies lay
scattered in different directions around them. She searched for the head
and...

Page 328

...my lodge, and asked me to allow her to
come with me to this place.' In...

Page 329

...drove them out. This last night they
were all driven out, and the young woman carried...