Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World. Part 6

By Mark Twain

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...FOLLOWING
...

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...for
a moment in the Cow Temple. By the door of it you will find...

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...into it from a square hole in the masonry above. You will
approach it with...

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...therefore, it will be well to go frequently to a
place where you can get

9. Temporary...

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...country a piece, and
you will be marching five or six days. But you will...

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...to them the knowledge, clear, thrilling, absolute, that they are
saved; and you can see by...

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...in "futures." He will make the Great
Pilgrimage around the city and so make his...

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...its bowels the theological forces
have been heaving and tossing, rumbling, thundering and quaking, boiling,
and weltering...

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...Ganges, the river of their idolatry. The
stairways are records of acts of piety; the...

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...had touched both, and both were now snow-pure, and could
defile no one. The memory...

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...about to speak of the burning-ghat.

They do not burn fakeers--those revered mendicants. They are...

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...equal to the honor of having
one's pyre lighted by one's son. The father who...

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...life. Even the life of vermin is sacred, and must not be taken.
The good...

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...wonderful view. A large
gray monkey was part of it, and damaged it. A...

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... From his little camp in a
neighboring garden, Hastings sent a party to arrest the...

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...be washed away, but he saved to England the Indian
Empire, and that was the best...

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...from people to whom in the majority of cases they were also
delusions acquired at second-hand--a...

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...this purity; he is no longer
of the earth, its concerns are matters foreign to him,...

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...would gladly build it. Sometimes he sees devotees for a
moment, and comforts them and...

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... If India
knows about nothing else American, she knows about those, and will keep
them in...

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...worldly
comfort. American and English millionaires do it every day, and thus
verify and confirm to...

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...reverence rises higher
than respect for his own sacred things; and therefore, it is not a...

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...dancing
are no doubt very good things in their season, but...

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...he
was. It is good that Clive cannot come back, for he would think it...

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...would make him celebrated anywhere else, and finishes as a
vice-sovereign, governing a great realm and...

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...not been seen in the earth since Agincourt, that laid deep and strong
the foundations of...

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...a last
effort at the windows, and several succeeded by leaping...

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...finding I must
quit the window or sink where I was,...

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...the southernmost wall of the prison. When I had lain
...

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...read, in the histories, that the June marches made
between Lucknow and Cawnpore by the British...

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...there are frequent groves of palm; and
an effective accent is given to the landscape by...

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...to enrich our high system with. We have a right
to do this. If...

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...to Marseilles. In my diary of that trip I find
this entry. I was...

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...they continued at it as long as
there was light to...

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...desert in the Middle Ages to escape the contamination of woman. For
...

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...or heard
of. It is from that museum, I think, that the globe must have...

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...as no more civilized than the Europeans.
At the railway station at Darjeeling you find plenty...

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...more. It was 45 miles away. Mount Everest is a thousand
feet higher, but...

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...fly down those steep inclines. It only needed a
strong brake, to modify its flight,...

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...but one sensation like the shock of that departure, and
that was the gaspy shock that...

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...branches which
were sixty feet above the ground. That is, I suppose it was a...

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...like a snake swallowing itself.

Half-way down the mountain we stopped about an hour at Mr....

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...will surpass expectation for
fecundity.

I am bringing some nightingales, too, and some cue-owls. I got...

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...Land of
Wonders.

For many years the British Indian Government has been trying to destroy
the murderous wild...

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...in the same six years 10,000 tigers were killed, minus
400.

The wolf kills nearly as many...

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...world not
subject to shrinkage.

I should like to have a royalty on the government-end of the...

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...road to the Ganges at a point near Dinapore,
and by a train which would have...

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...in it, and would have liked to take hold
of it vigorously and stamp it out...

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...up in an ocean of hostile populations. It
would take months to inform England and...

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...of sunstroke. We had no food amongst
us. An...

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...The sergeant held our horse, and
M---- put me up and...

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...seals, so I tied them under my petticoat. In an
...

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...and send them to Allahabad in boats. Their mud wall and their
barracks were in...

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...thrown into the river. The schoolgirls were burnt
to death....

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... "Thereupon the five men entered. It was the short gloaming...

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... three others were placed against the bank of the cut by which
...

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...had resorted as a means of
keeping out the murderers. ...

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...of a lie; still, it does
save work.

I am not trying to get out of repeating...

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...a half, the little garrison
industriously replying all the time. The women and children soon...

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...of the
siege:

"As an instance of the heavy firing brought to...

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...was continued until every
man was killed. That is a sample of the character of...

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...to
the Bailie Guard, the scene of as noble a defense...

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...I tried to
realize it; but when her little Johnny came rushing, all excitement,
through the din...

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...achievements of the garrisons of Lucknow and
Cawnpore will be guarded and preserved.

In Agra and its...

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... "The inlaid work, the marble, the flowers, the buds, the leaves, the
...

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...through a double screen of pierced
marble, which tempers the glare...

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... fort of Agra in the distance. From this beautiful and splendid
...

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...pen-box on the tomb of Emperor
Shah Jehan. But both...

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...mass the first three figures in the following way,
and they would speak the truth

Total--19

But the...

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...before me
particulars which I did not examine, and whose meanings I did not
cautiously and carefully...

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...ice-storm! the ice-storm!" and even the laziest
sleepers throw off the covers and join the rush...

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...any eye has
rested upon in this world, or will ever rest upon outside of the...

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...moonlight, two
hundred noble fountains--imagine the spectacle!" the North American would
have a vision of clustering columns...

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...and partly because one can
look in at the windows and see what is going on...

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...other one had my note-book,
and was reading a page of humorous notes and crying. ...

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...and always asleep, always stretched
out baking in the sun and adding to the deep tranquility...

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...and bullyrag them. He was fine at the railway
station--yes, he was at his finest...

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...use, anyway; so I reduced it.

When he had been with us two or three weeks,...

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...will become one if he keeps on. He told me
once that he used to...

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...that are more than a hundred feet wide; the blocks of houses
exhibit a long frontage...

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...their Sunday best of
gaudinesses, and the long procession of fanciful trucks freighted with
their groups of...