Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World. Part 3

By Mark Twain

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...FOLLOWING
...

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...away, and there was no time; but the
thing that surprised me was this: when I...

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...I did not feel competent to hunt on a horse that
went on stilts. So...

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...would
snatch a cat, and was away like a hurricane. A very excitable man.

"I went...

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...I should never accomplish anything. Just then a tall handsome
man in a fine uniform...

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...was at the worst, the stately station-master stepped out from
somewhere, and the soldier left me...

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...passage and
they damaged its speed. Two hundred and twenty yards; and so weightless
a toy--a...

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...fruits, and were just plain
savages, for all their smartness.

With a country as big as the...

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...not kill all the blacks, but they promptly
killed enough of them to make their own...

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...creatures; of which
in the day-time, the only audible signs are...

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... a wholesale and promiscuous fashion which offended against my
...

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...we have burned the savage at the stake; and this we do not care
for, because...

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...distant dependencies we may turn with advantage
to New Caledonia. ...

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...fancies and doubtful, but realities and authentic. In
his history, as preserved by the white...

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...intellect is the alertest and the brightest
known to history or tradition; and yet the poor...

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...into a hat placed in an
inverted position on the top...

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... or warn him of danger. A little examination of the...

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...Cape Riche, accompanied by a native on
foot. We traveled...

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...barb, which
was made, as usual, of hard wood about four...

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... their native state. He made a fire, and dug a hole...

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...import it."
"M-y word!"

"In cold print it is the equivalent of our "Ger-rreat Caesar!" but spoken
with...

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...turned out, upon inquiry, to be a pepper tree--an importation from
China. It has a...

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...to new ones where were water
and fresh pasturage; and this wide space had to be...

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...they were in vigorous and flourishing condition.

Experiments are made with different soils, to see what...

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...it
would stick. And there were a couple of gold bricks, very heavy to
handle, and...

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...of hidden water at a distance of fifty feet, and send
out slender long root-fibres to...

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...for a
lovely lake is not as common a thing along the railways of Australia as
are...

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...ship unloaded and
reloaded--and went back home for good in the same cabin they had come...

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...a result; and I think it may be called the finest
thing in Australasian history. ...

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...of a carbonaceous nature--a streak in the slate; a streak no
thicker than a pencil--and that...

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...men are well ordered; and
our maidens, 'not stepping over the...

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...than I was, but didn't seem to know it--a man full
of graces of the heart,...

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...is half as much as California has
produced.

It was through Mr. Blank--not to go into particulars...

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...that we had
this talk. He made me like him, and did it without trouble....

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... THE MARK...

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...dainty and pretty it was;
and very artistic. It was a frog peeping out from...

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...knew the style of any speaker in my own
club at home.

These reports came every month....

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...begun to
think of suicide. Then all of a sudden he thought of that happy...

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...and wrote the letter."

So the mystery was cleared up, after so many, many years.




CHAPTER XXVI.

There...

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...in the steamer on the great
lakes when I was crossing the continent to sail across...

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...of course the host is responsible, and must either
begin this talk himself or see that...

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...said that all he knew was, that it was
close to Australia, or Asia, or somewhere,...

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...to notice that the guest was looking
dazed, and wasn't saying anything. So they stirred...

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...South Pole, with nothing
in the way to obstruct its march and tone its energy down....

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...Substantially it means:

1. The Governor wishes the Whites and the Blacks to love each...

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...hard fighting, the surviving 300
naked patriots were still defiant, still persistent, still efficacious
with their rude...

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...the world has seen--the convicts set apart to
people the "Hell of Macquarrie Harbor Station"--were never...

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...tribe was by far the most important thing, the highest in
value, that happened during the...

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...a heavy sigh of relief, and
upward glance of gratitude, came...

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...might harass a large army with a small and
determined band;...

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...shelter, no
bed, no covering for his and his family's naked bodies, and nothing to
eat but...

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...see the signs of it. At that time Memphis had a wharf boat, of
course....

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...as that.

So the letter was prepared with great care and elaboration. It was
signed Alfred...

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...friend. Allow me--I will run my eye through it. He
says he says--why, who...

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...said:

"Now you can start home. But first we will have some more talk about
that...

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...of this extraordinary conduct? And
so, dreaming along, he reached the wharf-boat, and stepped aboard...

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...it?" And they looked at each other as people might who
thought that maybe they...

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...historian Laurie, whose
book, "The Story of Australasia," is just out, invoices its features with
considerable truth...

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...sea studded with lovely islets luxuriant to the water's
edge, one is at a loss which...

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...it is repeated in the glaciers and snowy ranges of many parts of the
earth; there...

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... Most curious of all was a parrot that kills
sheep. On one great sheep-run...

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...It was like being
suddenly set down in a new world--a weird world where Youth has...