Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World. Part 2

By Mark Twain

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...FOLLOWING
...

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...my, but it was coming at a lightning gait! Almost
before you could think, this...

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...sea. The ship was a sailing
vessel; a fine and favorite passenger packet, commanded by...

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...hundred persons in the ship, and but one survived the
disaster. He was a sailor....

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...here and there on these
ridges, snuggling amongst the foliage, and one catches alluring glimpses
of them...

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...of latitude,
then we could know a place's climate by its position on the map; and...

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...map of the world we are surprised to see how big
Australia is. It is...

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... around us. At noon I took a thermometer graded to...

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...thrifty housewife sees
in the distance the dark column advancing in...

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...fourteen years; and for serious crimes they were
transported for life. Children were sent to...

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...noticeably
worse than the average of the people they left behind them at home. We
must...

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...commerce, and in a most lawless way.
They went to importing rum, and also to manufacturing...

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... --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.

All English-speaking colonies...

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...not often met with
elsewhere. In laying on one side...

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...or another; in America the word indicates a man who owns a dozen
head of live...

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...were not pronounced enough, as a rule, to catch one's
attention. The people have easy...

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...is small and new to him. He is on his guard
then, and his natural...

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...that this universal credulity was a great
hindrance to the missionary in his work. Then...

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...I saw lively anticipation and strong interest in the faces
of...

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... there may be stronger ones to be found? That would...

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...recognized the divine source of his strength. But it
could...

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...gods. You must know, yourself, that Hanuman
could not have...

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...contract for lighting its
streets with the electric light, when I was there. That is...

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...the Governor's functions are much more limited than are a Governor's
functions with us. And...

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...and less exacting, until at last he was willing
to serve in the humblest capacities if...

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...The saying is, you mustn't judge a man by his clothes, and I'm
believing it now....

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...I don't quite know what; something
that's born in you and oozes out of you, I...

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...a thunderbolt as you have
just let fly ought to have made me jump out of...

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...notice that the last entry in the book is
dated 'London,' and is of the same...

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...the hook or the seine with agreeable mutton; the news
spreads and the sharks come from...

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...That was continental. Continental and troublesome.
Any detail of railroading that is not troublesome cannot...

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...American continent at luxurious railway rates would be
valuable enough to be coined when it arrived.

We...

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...shearer clips a piece out of
the sheep. It bars out the flies, and has...

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...he was: Arthur Orton, the mislaid roustabout of Wapping, or Sir
Roger Tichborne, the lost...

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...purses of his adherents and well-wishers. He was in evening
dress, and I thought him...

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...see--like Knowle; that Mr. B. was of a social disposition;
liked the company of agreeable people,...

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...and I never saw him again.. My curiosity faded away.

However, when I found that...

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...mitred Metropolitan of the Horse-Racing Cult. Its race-ground is the
Mecca of Australasia. On...

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...but
not everybody's; each of them rouses enthusiasm, but not everybody's; in
each case a part of...

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...when we travel are, first, the people;
next, the novelties; and finally the history of the...

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...was a prospective prisoner of war, but at dinners,
suppers, on the platform, and elsewhere, there...

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...make them as
beautiful as a dream. It is said that some of the country...

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...Wales Blue Book.]--and it is claimed that more
than one-tenth of this great aggregate is represented...

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...ago the fabulously rich silver
discovery at Broken Hill burst suddenly upon an unexpectant world. ...

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...route and stick to it, I should
think. Yet it is claimed that the aboriginal...

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... --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.

The train was now exploring...

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...effect as to make a body catch
his breath with the happy surprise of it. ...

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...the region of Adelaide and select town lots and farms in the
sand and the mangrove...

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...Unique is a
strong word, but I use it justifiably if I did not misconceive what...

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...on every hand, soft and delicate and dainty and
beautiful. On its near edge reposed...

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... That is the most curious feature of this curious table.
What is the matter with...

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...a head and
beak that are much too large for its body. In time man...

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...white men; provisions, wire, and poles had to be carried
over immense stretches of desert; wells...

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...that the Province is tolerant, religious-wise. It is so
politically, also. One of the...

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...so one of the great dignitaries gets a chance, and
begins his carefully prepared speech, impressively...

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...is contended--and may be said to be conceded--that the boomerang was
known to certain savage tribes...