Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World. Part 1

By Mark Twain

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...FOLLOWING
...

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... ...

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...Southern
Cross--Troublesome Constellations--Victoria for a Name--Islands on the
Map--Alofa and Fortuna--Recruiting for the Queensland Plantations
--Captain Warren's NoteBook--Recruiting...

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...Antiquity of the Boomerang


CHAPTER XX.
A Caller--A Talk about Old Times--The Fox Hunt--An Accurate Judgment of
an...

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...the Maoris--The Missionary Ways
all Wrong--The Tabu among the Maoris--A Mysterious Sign--Curious
War-monuments--Wellington


CHAPTER XXXVI.
The Poems of Mrs....

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...Annex a Mile Away--Doors in India--The Peepul Tree--Warning
against Cold Baths--A Strange Fruit--Description of Benares--The
Beginning of...

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... Mauritius
--The Indian Ocean--Our Captain's Peculiarity The Scot Has one too--The
Flying-fish that Went Hunting in...

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...Fortune in
Wine--The Great Diamond--Office of the De Beer Co.--Sorting the Gems
--Cape Town--The Most Imposing Man...

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...largest furniture-dealing
house in Victoria, and were worth a couple of farthings a dozen, though
they had...

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...of tobacco smoke made him sick. I did not
see how our smoke could reach...

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...day as if nothing had happened.

The brightest passenger in the ship, and the most interesting...

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...from
taking definite pledges, and merely resolved that I would kill an
injurious desire, but leave myself...

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...well man; so I gave thanks and took
to those delicacies again.

It seemed a valuable medical...

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...month my cigar had grown to such proportions that I could have
used it as a...

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... --Pudd'nhead Wilson's New...

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...that if he did not
put them down in black and white he might presently come...

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...things, including even
names and faces, and I could have furnished an instance of it if...

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...night and got up late in the morning. All the corridors
of the hotel were...

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...to supply the ending out of
their own invention. When every one who wanted a...

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...his contributions toward their support. These
were two forlorn and aged sisters who lived in...

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...up on the Taylor premises; then at last he was successful, and
got into the buggy....

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...I heard them. You may have said hut instead of cabin, but in
substance it's...

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...with Mr. Brown, and the rest of you go along to
my house and get things...

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...do look pale; I am ashamed of myself that I
didn't notice it sooner. Come...

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...back from town, now. I will keep old Polly patient and cheered
up--the crazy one...

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...out of character with Brown, and partly
because he was a special Providence and could not...

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...ten years he whipped out all
the other kings and made himself master of every one...

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...of
inestimable value in the business. Liholiho was headmaster of the tabu.
The tabu was the...

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...to the king. It was the best friend a king could have, and the
most...

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...on his father's plantation, and had
preferred their language and would learn no other. The...

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...Thus suddenly did my dream of twenty-nine years go to ruin.
Messages came from friends, but...

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...is easy to make plans in
this world; even a cat can do it; and when...

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...to perceive what the
Honolulu of to-day is, as compared with the Honolulu of my time....

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...preference, as in most warm countries, for
rattan or bamboo furniture;...

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...in
the yellow sunlight or the magical moonlight of the tropics."

There:...

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...some nearly
invisible sign about his skin, that the poison of leprosy was in him.
The secret...

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...has scarcely a joint left,
his limbs are only distorted ulcerated...

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...9 deg. 50' north latitude, at breakfast. Approaching the
equator on a long slant. ...

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...shore people would
change their minds about it at sea, on a long voyage. On...

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...of the
sea. It is an exciting game, and the crowd of spectators furnish
abundance of...

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...within the left-hand end of the 10.
(Applause). The umpire proclaimed "a good 10," and...

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...clock, and would not exist in that
one if it had been made by a sane...

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...the locker--sofa
under her port, and every time she over-slept and thus failed to take
care of...

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...apple
on the 8th, and I was at the same time eating the other half of...

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...proves nothing. Often a hen who has merely laid an egg cackles as
if she...

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...the reverence in his voice which is always present in
a Scotchman's tone when he utters...

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...is too
vague, too general, too indefinite. It does after a fashion suggest a
cross across...

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...we
saw the dim bulk of a couple of them, far away, spectral and dreamy
things; members...

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...natives on shore, and then we saw the recruiter-boat push out with a
...

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...that recruiting is not thoroughly popular
among the islanders; else why this bristling string of attacks...

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...All this is clear enough; but
the thing that is not clear is, what there is...

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...ornaments. The Waterbury, broken and dirty, finds its
way to...

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...that the evils charged by the missionaries upon the traffic
had existed in the past, and...

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...he is only a youth and
ignorant and persuadable to his hurt--but sympathy for him is...

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..."farce." "There
is as much cruelty and injustice done to natives by acts that are legal
as...

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... course; but long ere its setting rays are extinguished in the...

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...Traffic is this

"1. It generally demoralizes and always impoverishes the...

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...In front of us, to
the west, the wilderness stretches toward Australia, then curves upward
to New...

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...they have not seen before for forty years,
outside of the museum. For what Duluth...

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...You could
take it to almost any country and deceive people with it. But if...

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...force. The
educated young gentleman who is chief of the tribe that live in the
region...

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...grave with him. In 1804 twenty-seven British convicts escaped from
Australia to Fiji, and brought...

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... ...

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...was in New Zealand. He was a naturalist. His learning in his
specialty was...

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...a man; sundowner was merely the Australian equivalent of
our word, tramp. He is a...

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... for when times are dull and nothing much going on it buries...

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...mammal food was destroyed,
and when the pure floods from heaven...

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...thirsty it smacked its chops in gratitude over a blend
that...

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... in particular--the opulently endowed 'e pluribus unum' of the animal
...

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...of that poet and been impressed by them. It is
not apparent that he has...